06-Layer 3 - IP Routing Configuration Guide

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08-IPv6 Static Routing Configuration
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08-IPv6 Static Routing Configuration 108.56 KB

 

 

NOTE:

The term router in this document refers to both routers and Layer 3 switches.

 

Introduction to IPv6 static routing

Static routes are manually configured. They work well in simple networks. Configuring and using them properly can improve network performance and ensure enough bandwidth for important applications.

However, static routes also have limitations. Any topology changes require the network administrator to manually configure and modify the relevant static routes.

IPv6 static routes features

Similar to IPv4 static routes, IPv6 static routes work well in simple IPv6 network environments.

Their major difference lies in the destination and next hop addresses. IPv6 static routes use IPv6 addresses, whereas IPv4 static routes use IPv4 addresses. IPv6 static routes do not support VPN instance.

Default IPv6 route

An IPv6 static route with a destination prefix of ::/0  is a default IPv6 route. The default route is used to forward packets that match no specific routes in the routing table.

Configuring an IPv6 static route

In small IPv6 networks, IPv6 static routes can be used to forward packets. In comparison to dynamic routes, it helps to save network bandwidth.

Configuration prerequisites

Before you configure an IPv6 static route, complete the following tasks:

·           Configure parameters for the related interfaces.

·           Configure link layer attributes for the related interfaces.

·           Enable IPv6.

·           Make sure that the neighboring nodes can reach each other.

Configuration procedure

To configure an IPv6 static route:

 

Step

Command

Remarks

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

N/A

2.     Configure an IPv6 static route.

·       Approach 1:
ipv6 route-static ipv6-address prefix-length { interface-type interface-number [ next-hop-address ] | next-hop-address | vpn-instance d-vpn-instance-name nexthop-address } [ preference preference-value ]

·       Approach 2:
ipv6 route-static vpn-instance s-vpn-instance-name ipv6-address prefix-length { interface-type interface-number [ next-hop-address ] | nexthop-address [ public ] | vpn-instance d-vpn-instance-name nexthop-address } [ preference preference-value ]

Use either approach.

The default preference of IPv6 static routes is 60.

 

 

NOTE:

Follow these guidelines to configure the output interface and/or the next hop address for a static route:

·       If the output interface is a broadcast interface, such as an Ethernet interface, a VLAN interface, or an NBMA interface (such as an X.25 interface or frame relay interface), the next hop address must be specified. If both the output interface and the next hop must be specified, the next hop address must be a link-local address.

·       If the output interface is a point-to-point interface, you can specify either the output interface or the next hop address, but not both.

 

Displaying and maintaining IPv6 static routes

 

Task

Command

Remarks

Display IPv6 static route information.

display ipv6 routing-table protocol static [ inactive | verbose ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ]

Available in any view

Remove all IPv6 static routes.

delete ipv6 [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] static-routes all

Available in system view

 

 

NOTE:

·       Using the undo ipv6 route-static command can delete a single IPv6 static route. Using the delete ipv6 static-routes all command deletes all IPv6 static routes including the default route.

·       For more information about the display ipv6 routing-table protocol static [ inactive | verbose ] [ | { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ] command, see the chapter “IP routing basics configuration commands.”

 

IPv6 static routing configuration example

Network requirements

As shown in Figure 1, configure IPv6 static routes so that hosts can reach one another. The POS ports of the routers use the IPv6 local link addresses.

Figure 1 Network diagram

 

Configuration procedure

1.      Configure IPv6 addresses for all interfaces. (Details not shown)

2.      Configure IPv6 static routes:

# Configure the default IPv6 route on RouterA.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] ipv6 route-static :: 0 POS 3/1/1

# Configure two IPv6 static routes on RouterB.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] ipv6 route-static 1:: 64 POS 3/1/1

[RouterB] ipv6 route-static 3:: 64 POS 3/1/2

# Configure the default IPv6 route on RouterC.

<RouterC> system-view

[RouterC] ipv6 route-static :: 0 POS 3/1/1

3.      Configure the IPv6 addresses of hosts and gateways:

Configure the IPv6 addresses of all the hosts based on the network diagram, configure the default gateway of Host A as 1::1, that of Host B as 2::1, and that of Host C as 3::1.

4.      Verify the configuration:

# Display the IPv6 routing table on RouterA.

[RouterA] display ipv6 routing-table

Routing Table :

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

 Destination  : :: /128                              Protocol     : Static

 NextHop      : FE80::510A:0:8D7:1                   Preference   : 60

 Interface    : POS3/1/1                             Cost         : 0

 

 Destination  : ::1/128                              Protocol     : Direct

 NextHop      : ::1                                  Preference   : 0

 Interface    : InLoop0                              Cost         : 0

 

 Destination  : 1::/64                               Protocol     : Direct

 NextHop      : 1::1                                 Preference   : 0

 Interface    : GE1/1/1                              Cost         : 0

 

 Destination  : 1::1/128                             Protocol     : Direct

 NextHop      : ::1                                  Preference   : 0

 Interface    : InLoop0                              Cost         : 0

 

 Destination  : FE80::/10                            Protocol     : Direct

 NextHop      : ::                                   Preference   : 0

 Interface    : NULL0                                Cost         : 0

# Check connectivity with the ping command.

[RouterA] ping ipv6 3::1

  PING 3::1 : 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 3::1

    bytes=56 Sequence=1 hop limit=254  time = 63 ms

    Reply from 3::1

    bytes=56 Sequence=2 hop limit=254  time = 62 ms

    Reply from 3::1

    bytes=56 Sequence=3 hop limit=254  time = 62 ms

    Reply from 3::1

    bytes=56 Sequence=4 hop limit=254  time = 63 ms

    Reply from 3::1

    bytes=56 Sequence=5 hop limit=254  time = 63 ms

 

  --- 3::1 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 62/62/63 ms