07-MPLS Configuration Guide

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09-MPLS L3VPN configuration
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Contents

Configuring MPLS L3VPN·· 1

About MPLS L3VPN· 1

Basic MPLS L3VPN architecture· 1

MPLS L3VPN concepts· 1

MPLS L3VPN route advertisement 3

MPLS L3VPN packet forwarding· 4

MPLS L3VPN networking schemes· 5

Inter-AS VPN· 7

Carrier's carrier 11

Nested VPN· 13

HoVPN· 14

OSPF VPN extension· 16

BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute· 18

MPLS L3VPN FRR· 19

ECMP VPN route redistribution· 21

Protocols and standards· 22

Restrictions and guidelines: MPLS L3VPN configuration· 22

MPLS L3VPN tasks at a glance· 22

Prerequisites for MPLS L3VPN· 23

Configuring VPN instances· 23

Creating a VPN instance· 24

Associating a VPN instance with a Layer 3 interface· 24

Configuring route related attributes for a VPN instance· 25

Configuring routing between a PE and a CE· 26

Configuring static routing between a PE and a CE· 26

Configuring RIP between a PE and a CE· 26

Configuring OSPF between a PE and a CE· 26

Configuring IS-IS between a PE and a CE· 27

Configuring EBGP between a PE and a CE· 28

Configuring IBGP between a PE and a CE· 29

Configuring routing between PEs· 30

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route control 31

About BGP VPNv4 route control 31

Controlling BGP VPNv4 route advertisement, reception, and saving· 31

Setting a preferred value for received routes· 31

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route reflection· 32

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route attributes· 32

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route filtering· 33

Configuring BGP VPNv4 optimal route selection delay· 34

Configuring inter-AS VPN· 34

Configuring inter-AS option A· 34

Configuring inter-AS option B· 35

Configuring inter-AS option C· 36

Configuring nested VPN· 38

Configuring HoVPN· 40

Configuring the UPE· 40

Configuring the SPE· 40

Specifying the VPN label processing mode on the egress PE· 41

Configuring MPLS L3VPN FRR· 41

About MPLS L3VPN FRR· 41

Restrictions and guidelines· 41

Configuring FRR by using a routing policy· 42

Enabling MPLS L3VPN FRR for BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family· 43

Configuring an OSPF sham link· 44

About OSPF sham links· 44

Prerequisites· 44

Redistributing the loopback interface address· 44

Creating a sham link· 45

Configuring BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute· 45

Configuring BGP RT filtering· 46

Configuring the BGP additional path feature· 47

Specifying a local network to be advertised in the public instance or a VPN instance· 48

Configuring BGP VPNv4 routes to use private network next hops· 49

Configuring route replication· 49

Enabling ECMP VPN route redistribution· 50

Enabling prioritized withdrawal of specific routes· 51

Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN· 51

Enabling logging for BGP route flapping· 52

Display and maintenance commands for MPLS L3VPN· 52

Resetting BGP connections· 52

Displaying MPLS L3VPN information· 53

MPLS L3VPN configuration examples· 54

Example: Configuring basic MPLS L3VPN· 54

Example: Configuring a hub-spoke network· 60

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option A· 67

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option B· 71

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option C· 76

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN carrier's carrier in the same AS· 83

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN carrier's carrier in different ASs· 91

Example: Configuring nested VPN· 98

Example: Configuring HoVPN· 107

Example: Configuring an OSPF sham link· 115

Example: Configuring BGP AS number substitution· 119

Example: Configuring BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute· 123

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN FRR through VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route· 125

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN FRR through VPNv4 route backup for an IPv4 route· 127

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN FRR through IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route· 129

Configuring IPv6 MPLS L3VPN·· 132

About IPv6 MPLS L3VPN· 132

IPv6 MPLS L3VPN network diagram·· 132

IPv6 MPLS L3VPN packet forwarding· 132

IPv6 MPLS L3VPN routing information advertisement 133

IPv6 MPLS L3VPN network schemes and features· 133

Protocols and standards· 134

Restrictions and guidelines: IPv6 MPLS L3VPN configuration· 134

IPv6 MPLS L3VPN tasks at a glance· 134

Prerequisites for IPv6 MPLS L3VPN· 135

Configuring VPN instances· 135

Creating a VPN instance· 135

Associating a VPN instance with a Layer 3 interface· 135

Configuring route related attributes for a VPN instance· 136

Configuring routing between a PE and a CE· 137

Configuring IPv6 static routing between a PE and a CE· 137

Configuring RIPng between a PE and a CE· 137

Configuring OSPFv3 between a PE and a CE· 137

Configuring IPv6 IS-IS between a PE and a CE· 139

Configuring EBGP between a PE and a CE· 140

Configuring IBGP between a PE and a CE· 141

Configuring routing between PEs· 142

Configuring BGP VPNv6 route control 142

About BGP VPNv6 route control 142

Specifying a preferred value for BGP VPNv6 routes· 143

Setting the maximum number of received routes· 143

Configuring BGP VPNv6 route reflection· 143

Configuring BGP VPNv6 route attributes· 144

Configuring BGP VPNv6 route filtering· 145

Configuring BGP VPNv6 optimal route selection delay· 145

Configuring inter-AS IPv6 VPN· 146

Configuring inter-AS IPv6 VPN option A· 146

Configuring inter-AS IPv6 VPN option C· 146

Configuring an OSPFv3 sham link· 148

Prerequisites· 148

Redistributing the loopback interface address· 148

Creating a sham link· 149

Configuring BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute· 149

Configuring the BGP additional path feature· 150

Configuring route replication· 151

Enabling prioritized withdrawal of specific routes· 151

Enabling logging for BGP route flapping· 152

Display and maintenance commands for IPv6 MPLS L3VPN· 152

Resetting BGP connections· 152

Displaying IPv6 MPLS L3VPN information· 153

IPv6 MPLS L3VPN configuration examples· 154

Example: Configuring IPv6 MPLS L3VPNs· 154

Example: Configuring a hub-spoke network· 160

Example: Configuring IPv6 MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option A· 166

Example: Configuring IPv6 MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option C· 171

Example: Configuring IPv6 MPLS L3VPN carrier's carrier in the same AS· 178

Example: Configuring an OSPFv3 sham link· 185

Example: Configuring BGP AS number substitution· 190

Example: Configuring BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute· 194

 


Configuring MPLS L3VPN

About MPLS L3VPN

MPLS L3VPN is a L3VPN technology used to interconnect geographically dispersed VPN sites. MPLS L3VPN uses BGP to advertise VPN routes and uses MPLS to forward VPN packets over a service provider backbone. MPLS L3VPN provides flexible networking modes, excellent scalability, and convenient support for MPLS TE.

Basic MPLS L3VPN architecture

As shown in Figure 1, a basic MPLS L3VPN architecture has the following types of devices:

·     Customer edge device—A CE device resides on a customer network and has one or more interfaces directly connected to a service provider network. It does not support MPLS.

·     Provider edge device—A PE device resides at the edge of a service provider network and is connected to one or more CEs. All MPLS VPN services are processed on PEs.

·     Provider device—A P device is a core device on a service provider network. It is not directly connected to any CEs. A P device has only basic MPLS forwarding capability and does not handle VPN routing information.

Figure 1 Basic MPLS L3VPN architecture

 

MPLS L3VPN concepts

Site

A site has the following features:

·     A site is a group of IP systems with IP connectivity that does not rely on any service provider networks.

·     The classification of a site depends on the topology relationship of the devices, rather than the geographical positions. However, the devices at a site are, in most cases, adjacent to each other geographically.

·     The devices at a site can belong to multiple VPNs, which means that a site can belong to multiple VPNs.

·     A site is connected to a provider network through one or more CEs. A site can contain multiple CEs, but a CE can belong to only one site.

Sites connected to the same provider network can be classified into different sets by policies. Only the sites in the same set can access each other through the provider network. Such a set is called a VPN.

VPN instance

VPN instances implement route isolation, data independence, and data security for VPNs.

A VPN instance has the following components:

·     A separate Label Forwarding Information Base (LFIB).

·     An IP routing table.

·     Interfaces bound to the VPN instance.

·     VPN instance administration information, including route distinguishers (RDs), route targets (RTs), and route filtering policies.

To associate a site with a VPN instance, bind the VPN instance to the PE's interface connected to the site. A site can be associated with only one VPN instance, and different sites can be associated with the same VPN instance. A VPN instance contains the VPN membership and routing rules of associated sites.

VPN-IPv4 address

Each VPN independently manages its address space. The address spaces of VPNs might overlap. For example, if both VPN 1 and VPN 2 use the addresses on subnet 10.110.10.0/24, address space overlapping occurs.

BGP cannot process overlapping VPN address spaces. For example, if both VPN 1 and VPN 2 use the subnet 10.110.10.0/24 and each advertise a route destined for the subnet, BGP selects only one of them. This results in the loss of the other route.

Multiprotocol BGP (MP-BGP) can solve this problem by advertising VPN-IPv4 addresses (also called VPNv4 addresses).

Figure 2 VPN-IPv4 address structure

 

As shown in Figure 2, a VPN-IPv4 address consists of 12 bytes. The first eight bytes represent the RD, followed by a four-byte IPv4 prefix. The RD and the IPv4 prefix form a unique VPN-IPv4 prefix.

An RD can be in one of the following formats:

·     When the Type field is 0, the Administrator subfield occupies two bytes, the Assigned number subfield occupies four bytes, and the RD format is 16-bit AS number:32-bit user-defined number. For example, 100:1.

·     When the Type field is 1, the Administrator subfield occupies four bytes, the Assigned number subfield occupies two bytes, and the RD format is 32-bit IPv4 address:16-bit user-defined number. For example, 172.1.1.1:1.

·     When the Type field is 2, the Administrator subfield occupies four bytes, the Assigned number subfield occupies two bytes, and the RD format is 32-bit AS number:16-bit user-defined number, where the minimum value of the AS number is 65536. For example, 65536:1.

To guarantee global uniqueness for a VPN-IPv4 address, do not set the Administrator subfield to any private AS number or private IP address.

Route target attribute

MPLS L3VPN uses route target (also called VPN target) community attributes to control the advertisement of VPN routing information. A VPN instance on a PE supports the following types of route target attributes:

·     Export target attribute—A PE sets the export target attribute for VPN-IPv4 routes learned from directly connected sites before advertising them to other PEs.

·     Import target attribute—A PE checks the export target attribute of VPN-IPv4 routes received from other PEs. If the export target attribute matches the import target attribute of a VPN instance, the PE adds the routes to the routing table of the VPN instance.

Route target attributes define which sites can receive VPN-IPv4 routes, and from which sites a PE can receive routes.

Like RDs, route target attributes can be one of the following formats:

·     16-bit AS number:32-bit user-defined number. For example, 100:1.

·     32-bit IPv4 address:16-bit user-defined number. For example, 172.1.1.1:1.

·     32-bit AS number:16-bit user-defined number, where the minimum value of the AS number is 65536. For example, 65536:1.

MP-BGP

MP-BGP supports multiple address families, including IPv4 multicast and VPN-IPv4 address families.

In MPLS L3VPN, MP-BGP advertises VPN-IPv4 routes for VPN sites between PEs.

MPLS L3VPN route advertisement

In a basic MPLS L3VPN, CEs and PEs are responsible for advertising VPN routing information. P routers maintain only the routes within the backbone. A PE maintains only routing information for directly connected VPNs, rather than for all VPNs.

VPN routing information is advertised through the path local CE—ingress PE—egress PE—remote CE.

Route advertisement from the local CE to the ingress PE

The CE advertises standard IPv4 routing information to the ingress PE over a static route, RIP route, OSPF route, IS-IS route, EBGP route, or IBGP route.

Route advertisement from the ingress PE to the egress PE

The ingress PE performs the following operations:

1.     Adds RDs and route target attributes to these standard IPv4 routes and assign these routes MPLS labels to create VPN-IPv4 routes.

2.     Saves the VPN-IPv4 routes to the routing table of the VPN instance created for the CE.

3.     Advertises the VPN-IPv4 routes (with export targets and MPLS labels) to the egress PE through MP-BGP.

PEs can also exchange BGP EVPN routes for label exchange. For more information, see EVPN configuration in EVPN Configuration Guide.

Route advertisement from the egress PE to the remote CE

After receiving the VPN-IPv4 routes, the egress PE performs the following operations:

1.     Compares the routes' export target attributes with the local import target attributes.

2.     Adds the routes to the routing table of the VPN instance if the export and local import target attributes match each other.

3.     Restores the VPN-IPv4 routes to the original IPv4 routes.

4.     Advertises those routes to the connected CE over a static route, RIP route, OSPF route, IS-IS route, EBGP route, or IBGP route.

MPLS L3VPN packet forwarding

In a basic MPLS L3VPN (within a single AS), a PE adds the following information into VPN packets:

·     Outer tag—Identifies the public tunnel from the local PE to the remote PE. The public tunnel can be an LSP or an MPLS TE tunnel. Based on the outer tag, a VPN packet can be forwarded along the public tunnel to the remote PE.

·     Inner label—Identifies the remote VPN site. The remote PE uses the inner label to forward packets to the target VPN site. MP-BGP advertises inner labels for VPN-IPv4 routes among PEs.

Figure 3 VPN packet forwarding

As shown in Figure 3, a VPN packet is forwarded from Site 1 to Site 2 by using the following process:

1.     Site 1 sends an IP packet with the destination address 1.1.1.2. CE 1 transmits the packet to PE 1.

2.     PE 1 performs the following operations:

a.     Finds the matching VPN route based on the inbound interface and destination address of the packet.

b.     Labels the packet with both the inner label and the outer tag.

c.     Forwards the packet to the public tunnel.

3.     P devices forward the packet to PE 2 by the outer tag. The MPLS label is removed from the packet at the penultimate hop.

4.     PE 2 performs the following operations:

a.     Uses the inner label to find the matching VPN instance to which the destination address of the packet belongs.

b.     Looks up the routing table of the VPN instance for the output interface.

c.     Removes the inner label and forwards the packet out of the interface to CE 2.

5.     CE 2 transmits the packet to the destination through IP forwarding.

When two sites of a VPN are connected to the same PE, the PE directly forwards packets between the two sites through the VPN routing table without adding any tag or label.

MPLS L3VPN networking schemes

In MPLS L3VPNs, route target attributes are used to control the advertisement and reception of VPN routes between sites. They work independently and can be configured with multiple values to support flexible VPN access control and implement multiple types of VPN networking schemes.

Basic VPN networking scheme

In the simplest case, all users in a VPN form a closed user group. They can forward traffic to each other but cannot communicate with any user outside the VPN.

For the basic VPN networking scheme, you must assign a route target to each VPN for identifying the export target attribute and import target attribute of the VPN. Moreover, this route target cannot be used by any other VPNs.

Figure 4 Network diagram for basic VPN networking scheme

 

As shown in Figure 4, the route target for VPN 1 is 100:1, while that for VPN 2 is 200:1. The two VPN 1 sites can communicate with each other, and the two VPN 2 sites can communicate with each other. However, the VPN 1 sites cannot communicate with the VPN 2 sites.

Hub and spoke networking scheme

The hub and spoke networking scheme is suitable for a VPN where all users must communicate with each other through an access control device.

In a hub and spoke network as shown in Figure 5, configure route targets as follows:

·     On spoke PEs (PEs connected to spoke sites), set the export target to Spoke and the import target to Hub.

·     On the hub PE (PE connected to the hub site), use two interfaces that each belong to a different VPN instance to connect the hub CE. One VPN instance receives routes from spoke PEs and has the import target set to Spoke. The other VPN instance advertises routes to spoke PEs and has the export target set to Hub.

These route targets rules produce the following results:

·     The hub PE can receive all VPN-IPv4 routes from spoke PEs.

·     All spoke PEs can receive VPN-IPv4 routes advertised by the hub PE.

·     The hub PE advertises the routes learned from a spoke PE to the other spoke PEs so the spoke sites can communicate with each other through the hub site.

·     The import target attribute of a spoke PE is different from the export target attribute of any other spoke PE. Any two spoke PEs do not directly advertise VPN-IPv4 routes to each other. Therefore, they cannot directly access each other.

Figure 5 Network diagram for hub and spoke network

 

A route in Site 1 is advertised to Site 2 by using the following process:

1.     Spoke-CE 1 advertises a route in Site 1 to Spoke-PE 1.

2.     Spoke-PE 1 changes the route to a VPN-IPv4 route and advertises the VPN-IPv4 route to Hub-PE through MP-BGP.

3.     Hub-PE adds the VPN-IPv4 route into the routing table of VPN 1-in, changes it to the original IPv4 route, and advertises the IPv4 route to Hub-CE.

4.     Hub-CE advertises the IPv4 route back to Hub-PE.

5.     Hub-PE adds the IPv4 route to the routing table of VPN 1-out, changes it to a VPN-IPv4 route, and advertises the VPN-IPv4 route to Spoke-PE 2 through MP-BGP.

6.     Spoke-PE 2 changes the VPN-IPv4 route to the original IPv4 route, and advertises the IPv4 route to Site 2.

After spoke sites exchange routes through the hub site, they can communicate with each other through the hub site.

Extranet networking scheme

The extranet networking scheme allows specific resources in a VPN to be accessed by users not in the VPN.

In this networking scheme, if a VPN instance needs to access a shared site, the export target attribute and the import target attribute of the VPN instance must be contained in the import target attribute and the export target attribute of the VPN instance of the shared site, respectively.

Figure 6 Network diagram for extranet networking scheme

 

As shown in Figure 6, route targets configured on PEs produce the following results:

·     PE 3 can receive VPN-IPv4 routes from PE 1 and PE 2.

·     PE 1 and PE 2 can receive VPN-IPv4 routes advertised by PE 3.

·     Site 1 and Site 3 of VPN 1 can communicate with each other, and Site 2 of VPN 2 and Site 3 of VPN 1 can communicate with each other.

·     PE 3 advertises neither the VPN-IPv4 routes received from PE 1 to PE 2 nor the VPN-IPv4 routes received from PE 2 to PE 1 (routes learned from an IBGP neighbor are not advertised to any other IBGP neighbor). Therefore, Site 1 of VPN 1 and Site 2 of VPN 2 cannot communicate with each other.

Inter-AS VPN

In an inter-AS VPN networking scenario, multiple sites of a VPN are connected to multiple ISPs in different ASs, or to multiple ASs of an ISP.

Inter AS-VPN provides the following solutions:

·     VRF-to-VRF connections between ASBRs—This solution is also called inter-AS option A.

·     EBGP redistribution of labeled VPN-IPv4 routes between ASBRs—ASBRs advertise VPN-IPv4 routes to each other through MP-EBGP. This solution is also called inter-AS option B.

·     Multihop EBGP redistribution of labeled VPN-IPv4 routes between PE routers—PEs advertise VPN-IPv4 routes to each other through MP-EBGP. This solution is also called inter-AS option C.

Inter-AS option A

In this solution, PEs of two ASs are directly connected, and each PE is also the ASBR of its AS. Each PE treats the other as a CE and advertises unlabeled IPv4 unicast routes through EBGP. The PEs associate a VPN instance with a minimum of one interface.

Figure 7 Network diagram for inter-AS option A

 

As shown in Figure 7, in VPN 1, routes are advertised from CE 1 to CE 3 by using the following process:

1.     PE 1 advertises the VPN routes learned from CE 1 to ASBR 1 through MP-IBGP.

2.     ASBR 1 performs the following operations:

a.     Adds the routes to the routing table of the VPN instance whose import target attribute matches the export target attribute of the routes.

b.     Advertises the routes as IPv4 unicast routes to its CE (ASBR 2) through EBGP.

3.     ASBR 2 adds the IPv4 unicast routes to the routing table of the VPN instance that is bound to the receiving interface, and advertises the routes to PE 3 through MP-IBGP.

4.     PE 3 advertises the received routes to CE 3.

Packets forwarded within an AS are VPN packets that carry two labels. Packets forwarded between ASBRs are common IP packets.

Inter-AS option A is easy to carry out because no special configuration is required on the PEs acting as the ASBRs.

However, it has limited scalability because the PEs acting as the ASBRs must manage all the VPN routes and create VPN instances on a per-VPN basis. This leads to excessive VPN-IPv4 routes on the PEs. Associating a separate interface with each VPN also requires additional system resources.

Inter-AS option B

In this solution, two ASBRs use MP-EBGP to exchange VPN-IPv4 routes that they obtain from the PEs in their respective ASs.

Figure 8 Network diagram for inter-AS option B

 

As shown in Figure 8, in VPN 1, routes are advertised from CE 1 to CE 3 by using the following process:

1.     PE 1 advertises the VPN routes learned from CE 1 to ASBR 1 through MP-IBGP.

Assume that the inner label assigned by PE 1 for the routes is L1.

2.     ASBR 1 advertises the VPN-IPv4 routes to ASBR 2 through MP-EBGP.

Before advertising the routes, ASBR 1 modifies the next hop as its own address, assigns a new inner label (L2) to the routes, and associates L1 with L2.

3.     ASBR 2 advertises the VPN-IPv4 routes to PE 3 through MP-IBGP.

Before advertising the routes, ASBR 2 modifies the next hop as its own address, assigns a new inner label (L3) to the routes, and associates L2 with L3.

4.     PE 3 advertises the received routes to CE 3.

A packet is forwarded from CE 3 to CE 1 by using the following process:

1.     PE 3 encapsulates the received packet with two labels, and forwards the encapsulated packet to ASBR 2.

One of the labels is L3, and the other is the outer tag for the public tunnel from PE 3 to ASBR 2.

2.     ASBR 2 removes the outer tag, replaces L3 with L2, and forwards the packet to ASBR 1.

Packets between ASBR 1 and ASBR 2 carry only one inner label.

3.     ASBR 1 replaces L2 with L1, adds the outer tag of the public tunnel from ASBR 1 to PE 1, and forwards the packet to PE 1.

4.     PE 1 removes the inner label and outer tag and forwards the packet to CE 1.

In this solution, ASBRs must receive all inter-AS VPN routes. Therefore, ASBRs cannot filter incoming VPN-IPv4 routes by route targets.

Inter-AS option B has better scalability than option A. However, it requires that ASBRs maintain and advertise VPN routes.

Inter-AS option C

The Inter-AS option A and option B solutions require that the ASBRs maintain and advertise VPN-IPv4 routes. When every AS needs to exchange a great amount of VPN routes, the ASBRs might become bottlenecks, which hinders network extension. Inter-AS option C has better scalability because it makes PEs directly exchange VPN-IPv4 routes.

In this solution, PEs exchange VPN-IPv4 routes over a multihop MP-EBGP session. Each PE must have a route to the peer PE and a label for the route so that the inter-AS public tunnel between the PEs can be set up. Inter-AS option C sets up a public tunnel by using the following methods:

·     A label distribution protocol within the AS, for example, LDP.

·     Labeled IPv4 unicast route advertisement by ASBRs through BGP.

Labeled IPv4 unicast route advertisement refers to the process of assigning MPLS labels to IPv4 unicast routes and advertising IPv4 unicast routes and their labels.

Figure 9 Network diagram for inter-AS option C

 

As shown in Figure 9, in VPN 1, routes are advertised from CE 1 to CE 3 by using the following process:

1.     PE 1 advertises the VPN routes learned from CE 1 as VPN-IPv4 routes to PE 3 through multihop MP-EBGP.

Assume that the inner label assigned by PE 1 for the routes is Lx.

2.     PE 3 advertises the received routes to CE 3.

Setting up an inter-AS public tunnel is difficult in this solution. A public tunnel, for example, the one from PE 3 to PE 1, is set up by using the following process:

1.     Within AS 100, the public tunnel from ASBR 1 to PE 1 is set up by using a label distribution protocol, for example, LDP.

Assume that the outgoing label for the public tunnel on ASBR 1 is L1.

2.     ASBR 1 advertises labeled IPv4 unicast routes to ASBR 2 through EBGP.

The route destined for PE 1 and the label (L2) assigned by ASBR 1 for the route are advertised from ASBR 1 to ASBR 2. The next hop of the route is ASBR 1. The public tunnel from ASBR 2 to ASBR 1 is set up. The incoming label for the public tunnel on ASBR 1 is L2.

3.     ASBR 2 advertises labeled IPv4 unicast routes to PE 3 through IBGP.

The route destined for PE 1 and the label (L3) assigned by ASBR 2 for the route are advertised from ASBR 2 to PE 3. The next hop for the route is ASBR 2. The public tunnel from PE 3 to ASBR 2 is set up. The incoming label for the public tunnel on ASBR 2 is L3, and the outgoing label is L2.

4.     MPLS packets cannot be forwarded directly from PE 3 to ASBR 2. Within AS 200, the public tunnel from PE 3 to ASBR 2 is required to be set up hop by hop through a label distribution protocol, for example, LDP.

Assume that the outgoing label for the public tunnel on PE 3 is Lv.

After route advertisement and public tunnel setup, a packet is forwarded from CE 3 to CE 1 by using the following process:

1.     PE 3 performs the following routing table lookups for the packet:

a.     Finds a matching route with next hop PE 1 and inner label Lx, and encapsulates the packet with label Lx.

b.     Finds the route to PE 1 with next hop ASBR 2 and label L3, and encapsulates the packet with label L3 as the outer label.

c.     Finds the route to ASBR 2 with outgoing label Lv, and encapsulates the packet with label Lv as the outmost label.

2.     AS 200 transmits the packet to ASBR 2 by the outmost label.

3.     ASBR 2 removes the outmost label, replaces L3 with L2, and forwards the packet to ASBR 1.

4.     ASBR 1 replaces L2 with L1, and forwards the packet.

5.     AS 100 transmits the packet to PE 1 by the outer label.

6.     PE 1 removes the outer label, and forwards the packet to CE 1 according to the inner label Lx.

As shown in Figure 10, to improve scalability, you can specify a route reflector (RR) in each AS to exchange VPN-IPv4 routes with PEs in the same AS. The RR in each AS maintains all VPN-IPv4 routes. The RRs in two ASs establish a multihop MP-EBGP session to advertise VPN-IPv4 routes.

Figure 10 Network diagram for inter-AS option C using RRs

 

Carrier's carrier

If a customer of an MPLS L3VPN service provider is also a service provider:

·     The MPLS L3VPN service provider is called the provider carrier or the Level 1 carrier.

·     The customer is called the customer carrier or the Level 2 carrier.

This networking model is referred to as carrier's carrier.

The PEs of the Level 2 carrier directly exchange customer networks over a BGP session. The Level 1 carrier only learns the backbone networks of the Level 2 carrier, without learning customer networks.

For packets between customer networks to travel through the Level 1 carrier, the PE of the Level 1 carrier and the CE of the Level 2 carrier must assign labels to the backbone networks of the Level 2 carrier. The CE of the Level 2 carrier is a PE within the Level 2 carrier network.

Follow these guidelines to assign labels:

·     If the PE and the CE are in the same AS, you must configure IGP and LDP between them. If they are in different ASs, you must configure MP-EBGP to assign labels to IPv4 unicast routes exchanged between them.

·     You must enable MPLS on the CE of the Level 2 carrier regardless of whether the PE and CE are in the same AS.

A Level 2 carrier can be an ordinary ISP or an MPLS L3VPN service provider.

As shown in Figure 11, when the customer carrier is an ordinary ISP, its PEs and CEs run IGP to communicate with each other. The PEs do not need to run MPLS. PE 3 and PE 4 exchange customer network routes (IPv4 unicast routes) through an IBGP session.

Figure 11 Scenario where the Level 2 carrier is an ISP

 

As shown in Figure 12, when the customer carrier is an MPLS L3VPN service provider, its PEs and CEs must run IGP and LDP to communicate with each other. PE 3 and PE 4 exchange customer network routes (VPN-IPv4 routes) through an MP-IBGP session.

Figure 12 Scenario where the Level 2 carrier is an MPLS L3VPN service provider

 

 

NOTE:

As a best practice, establish equal cost LSPs between the Level 1 carrier and the Level 2 carrier if equal cost routes exist between them.

 

Nested VPN

The nested VPN technology exchanges VPNv4 routes between PEs and CEs of the ISP MPLS L3VPN and allows a customer to manage its own internal VPNs. Figure 13 shows a nested VPN network. On the service provider's MPLS VPN network, there is a customer VPN named VPN A. The customer VPN contains two sub-VPNs, VPN A-1 and VPN A-2.

The service provider PEs consider the customer's network as a common VPN user and do not join any sub-VPNs. The service provider CE devices (CE 1 and CE 2) exchange VPNv4 routes including sub-VPN routing information with the service provider PEs, which implements the propagation of the sub-VPN routing information throughout the customer network.

The nested VPN technology supports both symmetric networking and asymmetric networking. Sites of the same VPN can have the same number or different numbers of internal VPNs. Nested VPN also supports multiple-level nesting of internal VPNs.

Figure 13 Network diagram for nested VPN

 

In a nested VPN network, routing information is propagated by using the following process:

1.     After receiving VPN routes from customer CEs, a customer PE advertises VPN-IPv4 routes to the provider CEs through MP-BGP.

2.     The provider CEs advertise the VPN-IPv4 routes to a provider PE through MP-BGP.

3.     After receiving a VPN-IPv4 route, the provider PE keeps the customer's internal VPN information, and appends the customer's MPLS VPN attributes on the service provider network. It replaces the RD of the VPN-IPv4 route with the RD of the customer's MPLS VPN on the service provider network. It also adds the export route-target (ERT) attribute of the customer's MPLS VPN on the service provider network to the extended community attribute list of the route. The internal VPN information for the customer is maintained on the provider PE.

4.     The provider PE advertises VPN-IPv4 routes carrying the comprehensive VPN information to the other PEs of the service provider.

5.     After another provider PE receives the VPN-IPv4 routes, it matches the VPN-IPv4 routes to the import targets of its local VPNs. Each local VPN accepts routes of its own and advertises them to provider CEs. If a provider CE (such as CE 7 and CE 8 in Figure 13) is connected to a provider PE through an IPv4 connection, the PE advertises IPv4 routes to the CE. If it is a VPN-IPv4 connection (a customer MPLS VPN network), the PE advertises VPN-IPv4 routes to the CE.

6.     After receiving VPN-IPv4 routes from the provider CE, a customer PE matches those routes to local import targets. Each customer VPN accepts only its own routes and advertises them to connected customer CEs (such as CE 3, CE 4, CE 5, and CE 6 in Figure 13).

HoVPN

Hierarchy of VPN (HoVPN), also called Hierarchy of PE (HoPE), prevents PEs from being bottlenecks and is applicable to large-scale VPN deployment.

HoVPN divides PEs into underlayer PEs (UPEs) or user-end PEs, and superstratum PEs (SPEs) or service provider-end PEs. UPEs and SPEs have different functions and comprise a hierarchical PE. The HoPE and common PEs can coexist in an MPLS network.

Figure 14 Basic architecture of HoVPN

 

As shown in Figure 14, UPEs and SPEs play the following different roles:

·     A UPE is directly connected to CEs. It provides user access. It maintains the routes of directly connected VPN sites. It does not maintain the routes of the remote sites in the VPN, or it only maintains their summary routes. A UPE assigns inner labels to the routes of its directly connected sites, and advertises the labels along with VPN routes to the SPE through MP-BGP. A UPE features high access capability, small routing table capacity, and low forwarding performance.

·     An SPE is connected to UPEs and resides inside the service provider network. It manages and advertises VPN routes. It maintains all the routes of the VPNs connected through UPEs, including the routes of both the local and remote sites. An SPE advertises routes along with labels to UPEs, including the default routes of VPN instances or summary routes and the routes permitted by the routing policy. By using routing policies, you can control which sites in a VPN can communicate with each other. An SPE features large routing table capacity, high forwarding performance, and fewer interface resources.

Either MP-IBGP or MP-EBGP can run between SPE and UPE. When MP-IBGP runs between SPE and UPEs, the SPE acts as the RR of multiple UPEs and reflects routes between UPEs.

HoVPN supports HoPE recursion:

·     An HoPE can act as a UPE to form a new HoPE with an SPE.

·     An HoPE can act as an SPE to form a new HoPE with multiple UPEs.

HoVPN supports multilevel recursion. In HoPE recursion, the concepts of SPE and UPE are relative. A PE might be the SPE of its underlayer PEs and a UPE of its SPE at the same time.

Figure 15 Recursion of HoPEs

 

Figure 15 shows a three-level HoPE. The PE in the middle is called the middle-level PE (MPE). MP-BGP runs between SPE and MPE, and between MPE and UPE.

MP-BGP advertises the following routes:

·     All the VPN routes of UPEs to the SPEs.

·     The default routes of the VPN instance of the SPEs or the VPN routes permitted by the routing policies to the UPEs.

The SPE maintains the VPN routes of all sites in the HoVPN. Each UPE maintains only VPN routes of its directly connected sites. An MPE has fewer routes than the SPE but has more routes than a UPE.

OSPF VPN extension

This section describes the OSPF VPN extension. For more information about OSPF, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

OSPF for VPNs on a PE

If OSPF runs between a CE and a PE to exchange VPN routes, the PE must support multiple OSPF instances to create independent routing tables for VPN instances. Each OSPF process is bound to a VPN instance. Routes learned by an OSPF process are added into the routing table of the bound VPN instance.

OSPF area configuration between a PE and a CE

The OSPF area between a PE and a CE can be either a non-backbone area or a backbone area.

In the OSPF VPN extension application, the MPLS VPN backbone is considered the backbone area (area 0). The area 0 of each site must be connected to the MPLS VPN backbone (physically connected or logically connected through a virtual link) because OSPF requires that the backbone area be contiguous.

BGP/OSPF interaction

If OSPF runs between PEs and CEs, each PE redistributes BGP routes to OSPF and advertises the routes to CEs through OSPF. OSPF considers the routes redistributed from BGP as external routes but the OSPF routes actually belong to  the same OSPF domain. This problem can be resolved by configuring the same domain ID for sites in an OSPF domain.

Figure 16 Network diagram for BGP/OSPF interaction

 

As shown in Figure 16, CE 11, CE 21, and CE 22 belong to the same VPN and the same OSPF domain.

Before domain ID configuration, VPN 1 routes are advertised from CE 11 to CE 21 and CE 22 by using the following process:

1.     PE 1 redistributes OSPF routes from CE 11 into BGP, and advertises the VPN routes to PE 2 through BGP.

2.     PE 2 redistributes the BGP routes to OSPF, and advertises them to CE 21 and CE 22 in AS External LSAs (Type 5) or NSSA External LSAs (Type 7).

After domain ID configuration, VPN 1 routes are advertised from CE 11 to CE 21 and CE 22 by using the following process:

1.     PE 1 redistributes OSPF routes into BGP, adds the domain ID to the redistributed BGP VPNv4 routes as a BGP extended community attribute, and advertises the routes to PE 2.

2.     PE 2 compares the domain ID in the received routes with the locally configured domain ID. If they are the same and the received routes are intra-area or inter-area routes, OSPF advertises these routes in Network Summary LSAs (Type 3). Otherwise, OSPF advertises these routes in AS External LSAs (Type 5) or NSSA External LSAs (Type 7).

Routing loop avoidance

Figure 17 Network diagram for routing loop avoidance

 

As shown in Figure 17, Site 1 is connected to two PEs. When a PE advertises VPN routes learned from MP-BGP to Site 1 through OSPF, the routes might be received by the other PE. This results in a routing loop.

OSPF VPN extension uses the following tags to avoid routing loops:

·     DN bit (for Type 3 LSAs)—When a PE redistributes BGP routes into OSPF and creates Type 3 LSAs, it sets the DN bit for the LSAs. When receiving the Type 3 LSAs advertised by CE 11, the other PE ignores the LSAs whose DN bit is set to avoid routing loops.

·     Route tag (for Type 5 or 7 LSAs)—The two PEs use the same route tag. When a PE redistributes BGP routes into OSPF and creates Type 5 or 7 LSAs, it adds the route tag to the LSAs. When receiving the Type 5 or 7 LSAs advertised by CE 11, the other PE compares the route tag in the LSAs against the local route tag. If they are the same, the PE ignores the LSAs to avoid routing loops.

OSPF sham link

As shown in Figure 18, two routes exist between Site 1 and Site 2 of VPN 1:

·     A route over MPLS backbone—It is an inter-area route if PE 1 and PE 2 have the same domain ID, or is an external route if PE 1 and PE 2 are configured with no domain ID or with different domain IDs.

·     A direct route between CEs—It is an intra-area route that is called a backdoor link.

VPN traffic is always forwarded through the backdoor link because it has a higher priority than the inter-area route. To forward VPN traffic over the inter-area route, you can establish a sham link between the two PEs to change the inter-area route to an intra-area route.

Figure 18 Network diagram for sham link

 

A sham link is considered a virtual point-to-point link within a VPN and is advertised in a Type 1 LSA. It is identified by the source IP address and destination IP address that are the local PE address and the remote PE address in the VPN address space. Typically, the source and destination addresses are loopback interface addresses with a 32-bit mask.

To add a route to the destination IP address of a sham link to a VPN instance, the remote PE must advertise the source IP address of the sham link as a VPN-IPv4 address through MP-BGP. To avoid routing loops, a PE does not advertise the sham link's destination address.

BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute

BGP detects routing loops by examining AS numbers. If EBGP runs between PE and CE, you must assign different AS numbers to geographically different sites or configure the BGP AS number substitution feature to ensure correct transmission of routing information.

The BGP AS number substitution feature allows geographically different CEs to use the same AS number. If the AS_PATH of a route contains the AS number of a CE, the PE replaces the AS number with its own AS number before advertising the route to that CE.

After you enable the BGP AS number substitution feature, the PE performs BGP AS number substitution for all routes and re-advertises them to connected CEs in the peer group.

Figure 19 Application of BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute

 

As shown in Figure 19, both Site 1 and Site 2 use the AS number 800. AS number substitution is enabled on PE 2 for CE 2. Before advertising updates received from CE 1 to CE 2, PE 2 substitutes its own AS number 100 for the AS number 800. In this way, CE 2 can correctly receive the routing information from CE 1.

However, the AS number substitution feature also introduces a routing loop in Site 2 because route updates originated from CE 3 can be advertised back to Site 2 through PE 2 and CE 2. To remove the routing loop, you can configure the same SoO attribute on PE 2 for CE 2 and CE 3. PE 2 adds the SoO attribute to route updates received from CE 2 or CE 3, and checks the SoO attribute of route updates to be advertised to CE 2 or CE 3. The SoO attribute of the route updates from CE 3 is the same as the SoO attribute for CE 2, and PE 2 does not advertise route updates to CE 2.

For more information about the SoO attribute, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

MPLS L3VPN FRR

MPLS L3VPN Fast Reroute (FRR) is applicable to a dual-homed scenario, as shown in Figure 20. By using BFD to detect the primary link, FRR enables a PE to use the backup link when the primary link fails. The PE then selects a new optimal route, and uses the new optimal route to forward traffic.

MPLS L3VPN FRR supports the following types of backup:

·     VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route.

·     VPNv4 route backup for an IPv4 route.

·     IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route.

VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route

Figure 20 Network diagram

 

As shown in Figure 20, configure FRR on the ingress node PE 1, and specify the backup next hop for VPN 1 as PE 3. When PE 1 receives a VPNv4 route to CE 2 from both PE 2 and PE 3, it uses the route from PE 2 as the primary link, and the route from PE 3 as the backup link.

Configure BFD for LSPs or MPLS TE tunnels on PE 1 to detect the connectivity of the public tunnel from PE 1 to PE 2. When the tunnel PE 1PE 2 operates correctly, traffic from CE 1 to CE 2 goes through the path CE 1—PE 1—PE 2—CE 2. When the tunnel fails, the traffic goes through the path CE 1—PE 1—PE 3—CE 2.

In this scenario, PE 1 is responsible for primary link detection and traffic switchover.

For more information about BFD for LSPs or MPLS TE tunnels, see "Configuring MPLS OAM."

VPNv4 route backup for an IPv4 route

Figure 21 Network diagram

 

As shown in Figure 21, configure FRR on the egress node PE 2, and specify the backup next hop for VPN 1 as PE 3. When PE 2 receives an IPv4 route from CE 2 and a VPNv4 route from PE 3 (both routes are destined for VPN 1 connected to CE 2), PE 2 uses the IPv4 route as the primary link, and the VPNv4 route as the backup link.

PE 2 uses ARP or echo-mode BFD to detect the connectivity of the link from PE 2 to CE 2. When the link operates correctly, traffic from CE 1 to CE 2 goes through the path CE 1—PE 1—PE 2—CE 2. When the link fails, PE 2 switches traffic to the link PE 2—PE 3—CE 2, and traffic from CE 1 to CE 2 goes through the path CE 1—PE 1—PE 2—PE 3—CE 2. This avoids traffic interruption before route convergence completes (switching to the link CE 1—PE 1—PE 3—CE 2).

In this scenario, PE 2 is responsible for primary link detection and traffic switchover.

IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route

Figure 22 Network diagram

 

As shown in Figure 22, configure FRR on PE 1, and specify the backup next hop for VPN 1 as CE 2. When PE 1 receives an IPv4 route from CE 2 and a VPNv4 route from PE 2 (both routes are destined for VPN 1 connected to CE 2), PE 1 uses the VPNv4 route as the primary link, and the IPv4 route as the backup link.

Configure BFD for LSPs or MPLS TE tunnels on PE 1 to detect the connectivity of the public tunnel from PE 1 to PE 2. When the tunnel operates correctly, traffic from CE 1 to CE 2 goes through the path CE 1—PE 1—PE 2—CE 2. When the tunnel fails, the traffic goes through the path CE 1—PE 1—CE 2.

In this scenario, PE 1 is responsible for primary link detection and traffic switchover.

ECMP VPN route redistribution

This feature enables a VPN instance to redistribute all routes that have the same prefix and RD into its routing table. Based on the ECMP routes, the device can perform load sharing (as configured by the balance command) or MPLS L3VPN FRR. For more information about the balance command, see BGP in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Figure 23 Network diagram

 

As shown in Figure 23, CE 1 accesses the backbone network through VPN instance VPN1 created on PE 1. The RD of VPN instance VPN1 is 1:1. CE 2 accesses the backbone network through VPN instances created on PE 2 and PE 3. The VPN instances created on PE 2 and PE 3 have the same name VPN2 and the same RD 1:2. VPN instances VPN1 and VPN2 can communicate with each other.

Both PE 2 and PE 3 can advertise routes from CE 2 to PE 1, and the advertised routes have the same RD 1:2. By default, BGP redistributes only the optimal route into the routing table of VPN instance VPN1. After you enable this feature on VPN instance VPN1, BGP redistributes routes from both PE 2 and PE 3 to the routing table of VPN instance VPN1.

Protocols and standards

·     RFC 3107, Carrying Label Information in BGP-4

·     RFC 4360, BGP Extended Communities Attribute

·     RFC 4364, BGP/MPLS IP Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)

·     RFC 4577, OSPF as the Provider/Customer Edge Protocol for BGP/MPLS IP Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)

Restrictions and guidelines: MPLS L3VPN configuration

On the following switches, make sure the VXLAN hardware resource mode is Layer 2 gateway if both MPLS and VXLAN are used:

·     S6860 and S6861 switch series.

·     S6800-54HF, S6800-54HT, and S6800-2C-FC switches.

·     Switches labeled with the following product codes:

¡     LS-6800-32Q-H1.

¡     LS-6800-54QF-H3.

¡     LS-6800-54QT-H3.

¡     LS-6800-2C-H1.

¡     LS-6800-4C-H1.

In any other mode than Layer 2 gateway mode, MPLS features are not available. For more information about VXLAN hardware resource modes, see VXLAN Configuration Guide.

MPLS L3VPN tasks at a glance

Unless otherwise indicated, configure MPLS L3VPN on PEs.

To configure MPLS L3VPN, perform the following tasks:

1.     Configuring MPLS L3VPN basics

a.     Configuring VPN instances

b.     Configuring routing between a PE and a CE

c.     Configuring routing between PEs

d.     (Optional.) Configuring BGP VPNv4 route control

2.     Configuring advanced MPLS L3VPN networks

Choose the following tasks as needed:

¡     Configuring inter-AS VPN

Perform this task when sites of a VPN are connected to different ASs of an ISP.

¡     Configuring nested VPN

Deploy the nest VPN when a large number of VPNs exist and you want to hide from the outside of the customer internal VPNs.

¡     Configuring HoVPN

HoVPN prevents PEs from being bottlenecks and is applicable to large-scale VPN deployment.

3.     (Optional.) Specifying the VPN label processing mode on the egress PE

4.     (Optional.) Configuring MPLS L3VPN FRR

5.     (Optional.) Controlling route advertisement and reception in an MPLS L3VPN network

¡     Configuring an OSPF sham link

¡     Configuring BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute

¡     Configuring BGP RT filtering

Perform this task to reduce the number of routes advertised in an MPLS L3VPN.

¡     Configuring the BGP additional path feature

Perform this task to enable BGP to advertise multiple routes with the same prefix and different next hops to a peer or peer group.

¡     Specifying a local network to be advertised in the public instance or a VPN instance

¡     Configuring BGP VPNv4 routes to use private network next hops

¡     Configuring route replication

Perform this task to enable a VPN instance to communicate with the public network or other VPN instances by replicating routes from the public network or other VPN instances.

¡     Enabling ECMP VPN route redistribution

Perform this task to enable a VPN instance to redistribute all routes that have the same prefix and RD into its routing table to perform load sharing or MPLS L3VPN FRR.

¡     Enabling prioritized withdrawal of specific routes

Perform this task to configure BGP to send the withdrawal messages of specific routes prior to other routes to achieve fast switchover of traffic and reduce the traffic interruption time.

6.     (Optional.) Maintaining MPLS L3VPN networks

¡     Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN

¡     Enabling logging for BGP route flapping

Prerequisites for MPLS L3VPN

Before you configure basic MPLS L3VPN, perform the following tasks:

1.     Configure an IGP on the PEs and P devices to ensure IP connectivity within the MPLS backbone.

2.     Configure basic MPLS for the MPLS backbone.

3.     Configure MPLS LDP on the PEs and P devices to establish LDP LSPs.

Configuring VPN instances

All VPN instance configurations are performed on PEs.

Creating a VPN instance

About VPN instances

A VPN instance is a collection of the VPN membership and routing rules of its associated site. A VPN instance might correspond to more than one VPN.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a VPN instance and enter VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

3.     Configure an RD for the VPN instance.

route-distinguisher route-distinguisher

By default, no RD is configured for a VPN instance.

4.     (Optional.) Configure a description for the VPN instance.

description text

By default, no description is configured for a VPN instance.

5.     (Optional.) Configure a VPN ID for the VPN instance.

vpn-id vpn-id

By default, no VPN ID is configured for a VPN instance.

6.     (Optional.) Configure an SNMP context for the VPN instance.

snmp context-name context-name

By default, no SNMP context is configured.

Associating a VPN instance with a Layer 3 interface

Restrictions and guidelines

If an interface is associated with a VSI or cross-connect, the interface (including its subinterfaces) cannot associate with a VPN instance.

If a subinterface is associated with a VSI or cross-connect, the subinterface cannot associate with a VPN instance.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Associate a VPN instance with the interface.

ip binding vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

By default, an interface is not associated with a VPN instance and belongs to the public network.

The ip binding vpn-instance command deletes the IP address of the current interface. You must reconfigure an IP address for the interface after configuring the command.

Configuring route related attributes for a VPN instance

Restrictions and guidelines

Configurations made in VPN instance view apply to both IPv4 VPN and IPv6 VPN.

IPv4 VPN prefers the configurations in VPN instance IPv4 address family view over the configurations in VPN instance view.

Prerequisites

Before you perform this task, create the routing policies to be used by this task. For information about routing policies, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter VPN instance view or VPN instance IPv4 address family view.

¡     Enter VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter VPN instance IPv4 address family view:

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

address-family ipv4

3.     Configure route targets.

vpn-target vpn-target&<1-8> [ both | export-extcommunity | import-extcommunity ]

By default, no route targets are configured.

4.     Set the maximum number of active routes.

routing-table limit number { warn-threshold | simply-alert }

By default, the number of active routes in a VPN instance is not limited.

Setting the maximum number of active routes for a VPN instance can prevent the device from learning too many routes.

5.     Apply an import routing policy.

import route-policy route-policy

By default, all routes matching the import target attribute are accepted.

6.     Apply an export routing policy.

export route-policy route-policy

By default, routes to be advertised are not filtered.

7.     Apply a tunnel policy to the VPN instance.

tnl-policy tunnel-policy-name

By default, only one tunnel is selected (no load balancing), and an LSP tunnel takes precedence over a CRLSP tunnel.

If the specified tunnel policy does not exist, the default tunnel policy is used.

For information about tunnel policies, see "Configuring tunnel policies."

Configuring routing between a PE and a CE

Configuring static routing between a PE and a CE

About static routing between a PE and a CE

Perform this configuration on the PE. On the CE, configure a common static route.

For more information about static routing, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure a static route for a VPN instance.

ip route-static vpn-instance s-vpn-instance-name dest-address { mask-length | mask } { interface-type interface-number [ next-hop-address ] | next-hop-address [ public ] | vpn-instance d-vpn-instance-name next-hop-address }

Configuring RIP between a PE and a CE

About RIP between a PE and a CE

Perform this configuration on the PE. On the CE, create a common RIP process.

For more information about RIP, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a RIP process for a VPN instance and enter RIP view.

rip [ process-id ] vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

A RIP process can belong to only one VPN instance.

3.     Enable RIP on the interface attached to the specified network.

network network-address [ wildcard-mask ]

By default, RIP is disabled on an interface.

Configuring OSPF between a PE and a CE

About OSPF between a PE and a CE

Perform this configuration on the PE. On the CE, create a common OSPF process.

For more information about OSPF, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create an OSPF process for a VPN instance and enter the OSPF view.

ospf [ process-id | router-id router-id ] * vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

 

Parameter

Usage guidelines

router-id router-id

An OSPF process bound to a VPN instance does not use the public network router ID configured in system view. Therefore, you must specify a router ID when creating a process or configure an IP address for a minimum of one interface in the bound VPN instance.

vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

An OSPF process can belong to only one VPN instance.

If you delete a VPN instance, all OSPF processes of the VPN instance are also deleted.

 

3.     Redistribute BGP routes.

import-route bgp [ as-number ] [ allow-ibgp ] [ cost cost-value | nssa-only | route-policy route-policy-name | tag tag | type type ] *

By default, OSPF does not redistribute routes from other routing protocols.

If the vpn-instance-capability simple command is not configured for the OSPF process, the allow-ibgp keyword is optional to redistribute VPNv4 routes learned from MP-IBGP peers. In any other cases, if you do not specify the allow-ibgp keyword, the OSPF process does not redistribute VPNv4 routes learned from MP-IBGP peers.

4.     (Optional.) Set an OSPF domain ID.

domain-id domain-id [ secondary ]

The default domain ID is 0.

 

Description

Restrictions and guidelines

The domain ID is carried in the routes of the OSPF process. When redistributing routes from the OSPF process, BGP adds the domain ID as an extended community attribute into BGP route.

An OSPF process can be configured with only one primary domain ID. Domain IDs of different OSPF processes can be the same.

All OSPF processes of a VPN must be configured with the same domain ID.

 

5.     (Optional.) Configure the type codes of OSPF extended community attributes.

ext-community-type { domain-id type-code1 | router-id type-code2 | route-type type-code3 }

The defaults are as follows:

¡     0x0005 for Domain ID.

¡     0x0107 for Router ID.

¡     0x0306 for Route Type.

6.     Create an OSPF area and enter area view.

area area-id

7.     Enable OSPF on the interface attached to the specified network in the area.

network ip-address wildcard-mask

By default, an interface neither belongs to any area nor runs OSPF.

Configuring IS-IS between a PE and a CE

About IS-IS between a PE and a CE

Perform this configuration on the PE. On the CE, configure common IS-IS.

For more information about IS-IS, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create an IS-IS process for a VPN instance and enter IS-IS view.

isis [ process-id ] vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

An IS-IS process can belong to only one VPN instance.

3.     Configure a network entity title for the IS-IS process.

network-entity net

By default, no NET is configured.

4.     Return to system view.

quit

5.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

6.     Enable the IS-IS process on the interface.

isis enable [ process-id ]

By default, no IS-IS process is enabled on the interface.

Configuring EBGP between a PE and a CE

Configuring the PE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable a BGP instance and enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

By default, BGP is not enabled.

3.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

Configuration commands in BGP-VPN instance view are the same as those in BGP instance view. For more information, see BGP in Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

4.     Configure the CE as the VPN EBGP peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

For more information about this command, see BGP in  Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

5.     Create the BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family and enter its view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

6.     Enable IPv4 unicast route exchange with the specified peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange IPv4 unicast routes with a peer.

7.     Redistribute the routes of the local CE.

import-route protocol [ { process-id | all-processes } [ allow-direct | med med-value | route-policy route-policy-name ] * ]

A PE must redistribute the routes of the local CE into its VPN routing table so it can advertise them to the peer PE.

8.     Allow the local AS number to appear in the AS_PATH attribute of a received route, and set the maximum number of repetitions.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } allow-as-loop [ number ]

By default, BGP discards incoming route updates that contain the local AS number.

Execute this command in a hub-spoke network where EBGP is running between a PE and a CE to enable the PE to receive the route updates from the CE.

Configuring the CE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable a BGP instance and enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

By default, BGP is not enabled.

3.     Configure the PE as a BGP peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

4.     Create the BGP IPv4 unicast address family and enter its view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

5.     Enable IPv4 unicast route exchange with the specified peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange IPv4 unicast routes with any peer.

6.     Configure route redistribution.

import-route protocol [ { process-id | all-processes } [ allow-direct | med med-value | route-policy route-policy-name ] * ]

A CE must redistribute its routes to the PE so the PE can advertise them to the peer CE.

Configuring IBGP between a PE and a CE

Restrictions and guidelines

Use IBGP between PE and CE only in a basic MPLS L3VPN network. In networks such as Hub&Spoke, Extranet, inter-AS VPN, carrier's carrier, nested VPN, and HoVPN, you cannot use IBGP between PE and CE.

Configuring the PE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable a BGP instance and enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

By default, BGP is not enabled.

3.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

Configuration commands in BGP-VPN instance view are the same as those in BGP instance view. For more information, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

4.     Configure the CE as the VPN IBGP peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

5.     Create the BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family and enter its view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

6.     Enable IPv4 unicast route exchange with the specified peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange IPv4 unicast routes with any peer.

7.     Configure the CE as a client of the RR to enable the PE to advertise routes learned from the IBGP peer CE to other IBGP peers.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } reflect-client

By default, no RR or RR client is configured.

Configuring an RR does not change the next hop of a route. To change the next hop of a route, configure an inbound policy on the receiving side.

8.     (Optional.) Enable route reflection between clients.

reflect between-clients

By default, route reflection between clients is enabled.

9.     (Optional.) Configure the cluster ID for the RR.

reflector cluster-id { cluster-id | ip-address }

By default, the RR uses its own router ID as the cluster ID.

If multiple RRs exist in a cluster, use this command to configure the same cluster ID for all RRs in the cluster to avoid routing loops.

Configuring the CE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable a BGP instance and enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

By default, BGP is not enabled.

3.     Configure the PE as an IBGP peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

4.     Create the BGP IPv4 unicast address family and enter its view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

5.     Enable IPv4 unicast route exchange with the specified peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange IPv4 unicast routes with a peer.

6.     Configure route redistribution.

import-route protocol [ { process-id | all-processes } [ allow-direct | med med-value | route-policy route-policy-name ] * ]

A CE must redistribute its routes to the PE so the PE can advertise them to the peer CE.

Configuring routing between PEs

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable a BGP instance and enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

By default, BGP is not enabled.

3.     Configure the remote PE as a BGP peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

4.     (Optional.) Specify the source interface for TCP connections.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } connect-interface interface-type interface-number

By default, BGP uses the output interface of the optimal route destined for the peer as the source interface.

5.     Create the BGP VPNv4 address family and enter its view.

address-family vpnv4

6.     Enable BGP VPNv4 route exchange with the specified peer.

peer { group-name | ip-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange BGP VPNv4 routes with a peer.

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route control

About BGP VPNv4 route control

BGP VPNv4 route control is configured similarly with BGP route control, except that it is configured in BGP VPNv4 address family view. For more information about BGP route control, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Controlling BGP VPNv4 route advertisement, reception, and saving

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Advertise a default VPN route to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } default-route-advertise vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

By default, no default VPN route is advertised to a peer or peer group.

5.     Set the maximum number of routes BGP can receive from a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } route-limit prefix-number [ { alert-only | discard | reconnect reconnect-time } | percentage-value ] *

By default, the number of routes that BGP can receive from a peer or peer group is not limited.

6.     Save all route updates from a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } keep-all-routes

By default, BGP does not save route updates from a peer.

Setting a preferred value for received routes

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Set a preferred value for routes received from a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } preferred-value value

By default, the preferred value for routes received from a peer or peer group is 0.

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route reflection

About BGP VPNv4 route reflection

To ensure the connectivity of IBGP peers, you must establish full-mesh IBGP connections, which costs massive network and CPU resources.

To reduce IBGP connections in the network, you can configure a router as a route reflector (RR) and configure other routers as its clients. You only need to establish IBGP connections between the RR and its clients to enable the RR to forward routes to the clients.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Configure the device as a route reflector and specify a peer or peer group as its client.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } reflect-client

By default, no route reflector or client is configured.

5.     (Optional.) Enable route reflection between clients.

reflect between-clients

By default, route reflection between clients is enabled.

6.     (Optional.) Configure a cluster ID for the RR.

reflector cluster-id { cluster-id | ip-address }

By default, the RR uses its own router ID as the cluster ID.

7.     (Optional.) Configure a filtering policy for reflected routes.

rr-filter ext-comm-list-number

By default, the RR does not filter reflected routes.

8.     (Optional.) Enable the route reflector to change the attributes of routes to be reflected.

reflect change-path-attribute

By default, the route reflector cannot change the attributes of routes to be reflected.

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route attributes

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Configure the NEXT_HOP attribute.

¡     Set the device as the next hop for routes sent to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } next-hop-local

By default, the device uses its address as the next hop for routes advertised to peers.

¡     Configure the device to not change the next hop of routes advertised to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } next-hop-invariable

By default, the device uses its address as the next hop for routes advertised to peers.

On an RR in an inter-AS option C scenario, you must configure this command to not change the next hop of VPNv4 routes advertised to BGP peers and RR clients.

5.     Configure the AS_PATH attribute.

¡     Allow the local AS number to appear in the AS_PATH attribute of a received route and set the maximum number of repetitions.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } allow-as-loop [ number ]

By default, BGP discards incoming routes that contain the local AS number.

¡     Remove private AS numbers in BGP updates sent to an EBGP peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } public-as-only

By default, BGP updates sent to an EBGP peer or peer group can carry both public and private AS numbers.

6.     Advertise the COMMUNITY attribute to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } advertise-community

By default, BGP does not advertise the COMMUNITY attribute to a peer or peer group.

7.     Configure the SoO attribute for a peer for peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } soo site-of-origin

By default, the SoO attribute is not configured.

Configuring BGP VPNv4 route filtering

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Filter advertised routes.

filter-policy { ipv4-acl-number | name ipv4-acl-name | prefix-list prefix-list-name } export [ direct | { isis | ospf | rip } process-id | static ]

By default, BGP does not filter advertised routes.

5.     Filter received routes.

filter-policy { ipv4-acl-number | name ipv4-acl-name | prefix-list prefix-list-name } import

By default, BGP does not filter received routes.

6.     Configure AS_PATH list-based route filtering for a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } as-path-acl as-path-acl-number { export | import }

By default, AS_PATH list-based route filtering is not configured.

7.     Configure ACL-based route filtering for a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } filter-policy { ipv4-acl-number | name ipv4-acl-name } { export | import }

By default, ACL-based route filtering is not configured.

8.     Configure IP prefix list-based route filtering for a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } prefix-list prefix-list-name { export | import }

By default, no IP prefix list-based route filtering is configured.

9.     Apply a routing policy to routes advertised to or received from a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } route-policy route-policy-name { export | import }

By default, no routing policy is applied for a peer.

10.     Enable route target filtering for received BGP VPNv4 routes.

policy vpn-target

By default, route target filtering is enabled for received VPNv4 routes. Only VPNv4 routes whose export route target attribute matches the local import route target attribute are added to the routing table.

Configuring BGP VPNv4 optimal route selection delay

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Set the BGP VPNv4 optimal route selection delay timer.

route-select delay delay-value

By default, the optimal route selection delay timer is 0 seconds, which means optimal route selection is not delayed.

Configuring inter-AS VPN

Configuring inter-AS option A

Inter-AS option A applies to scenarios with a few VPNs.

To configure inter-AS option A, create VPN instances on PEs and ASBRs. The VPN instances on PEs are used to allow CEs to access the network. The VPN instances on ASBRs are used to access the peer ASBRs. An ASBR considers the peer ASBR as a CE.

The route targets configured on the PEs must match those configured on the ASBRs in the same AS to make sure VPN routes sent by the PEs (or ASBRs) can be received by the ASBRs (or PEs). Route targets configured on the PEs in different ASs do not have such requirements.

Configuring inter-AS option B

Restrictions and guidelines

An ASBR always sets itself as the next hop of VPNv4 routes advertised to an MP-IBGP peer regardless of the peer next-hop-local command.

Configuring a PE

Configure basic MPLS L3VPN, and specify the ASBR in the same AS as an MP-IBGP peer. The route targets for the VPN instances on the PEs in different ASs must match for the same VPN.

Configuring an ASBR

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable MPLS and LDP on the interface connected to an internal router of the AS:

a.     Configure an LSR ID for the local LSR.

mpls lsr-id lsr-id

By default, no LSR ID is configured.

b.     Enable LDP on the local LSR and enter LDP view.

mpls ldp

By default, LDP is disabled.

c.     Return to system view.

quit

d.     Enter interface view of the interface connected to an internal router of the AS.

interface interface-type interface-number

e.     Enable MPLS on the interface.

mpls enable

By default, MPLS is disabled on the interface.

f.     Enable MPLS LDP on the interface.

mpls ldp enable

By default, MPLS LDP is disabled on the interface.

g.     Return to system view.

quit

3.     Enable MPLS on the interface connected to the remote ASBR:

a.     Enter interface view of the interface connected to the remote ASBR.

interface interface-type interface-number

b.     Enable MPLS on the interface.

mpls enable

By default, MPLS is disabled on the interface.

c.     Return to system view.

quit

4.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

5.     Configure PEs in the same AS as IBGP peers and ASBRs in different ASs as EBGP peers.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

6.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

7.     Enable BGP to exchange VPNv4 routes with the PE in the same AS and the ASBR in another AS.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP cannot exchange VPNv4 routes with a peer.

8.     Disable route target filtering of received VPNv4 routes.

undo policy vpn-target

By default, route target filtering is enabled for received VPNv4 routes.

Configuring inter-AS option C

Restrictions and guidelines

PEs are not directly connected. For the PEs to establish neighbor relationships, execute the peer ebgp-max-hop command to enable the local router to establish an EBGP session to an indirectly-connected peer.

Prerequisites

Before you configure inter-AS option C, perform the following tasks:

·     Configure BGP to advertise routes destined for a PE on PEs or ASBRs. For more information, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

·     Configure VPN instances on PEs.

·     Configure routing between PE and CE.

Configuring a PE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Configure the ASBR in the same AS as an IBGP peer and configure the PE of another AS as an EBGP peer.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

4.     Create the BGP IPv4 unicast address family and enter its view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

5.     Enable BGP to exchange IPv4 unicast routes with the ASBR in the same AS.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange IPv4 unicast routes with any peer.

6.     Enable BGP to exchange labeled IPv4 routes with the ASBR in the same AS.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } label-route-capability

By default, BGP cannot exchange labeled routes with any IPv4 peer or peer group.

7.     Return to BGP instance view.

quit

8.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

9.     Enable BGP to exchange VPNv4 routes with the PE in different ASs.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP cannot exchange VPNv4 routes with any peer.

10.     (Optional.) Configure the PE to not change the next hop of routes advertised to the peer.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } next-hop-invariable

By default, the device uses its address as the next hop of routes advertised to peers.

Configure this command on the RR so the RR does not change the next hop of advertised VPNv4 routes.

Configuring an ASBR

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure a routing policy:

a.     Create a routing policy, and enter routing policy view.

route-policy route-policy-name { deny | permit } node node-number

b.     Match IPv4 routes carrying labels.

if-match mpls-label

By default, no MPLS label match criterion is configured.

You can configure if-match clauses in the routing policy to filter routes. Routes surviving the filtering are assigned labels, and all others are advertised as common IPv4 routes.

c.     Set labels for IPv4 routes.

apply mpls-label

By default, no MPLS label is set for IPv4 routes.

d.     Return to system view.

quit

3.     Enable MPLS and LDP on the interface connected to an internal router of the AS:

a.     Configure an LSR ID for the local LSR.

mpls lsr-id lsr-id

By default, no LSR ID is configured.

b.     Enable LDP on the local LSR and enter LDP view.

mpls ldp

By default, LDP is disabled.

c.     Return to system view.

quit

d.     Enter interface view of the interface connected to an internal router of the AS.

interface interface-type interface-number

e.     Enable MPLS on the interface.

mpls enable

By default, MPLS is disabled on the interface.

f.     Enable MPLS LDP on the interface.

mpls ldp enable

By default, MPLS LDP is disabled on the interface.

g.     Return to system view.

quit

4.     Enable MPLS on the interface connected to the remote ASBR.

a.     Enter interface view of the interface connected to the remote ASBR.

interface interface-type interface-number

b.     Enable MPLS on the interface.

mpls enable

By default, MPLS is disabled on the interface.

c.     Return to system view.

quit

5.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

6.     Configure PEs in the same AS as IBGP peers and ASBRs in different ASs as EBGP peers.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

7.     Create BGP IPv4 unicast address family and enter its view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

8.     Enable BGP to exchange IPv4 unicast routes with the PE in the same AS and the ASBR in another AS.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP cannot exchange IPv4 unicast routes with a peer.

9.     Enable BGP to exchange labeled IPv4 routes with the PE in the same AS and the ASBR in another AS.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } label-route-capability

By default, BGP cannot exchange labeled IPv4 routes with a peer.

10.     Specify the device as the next hop of routes sent to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } next-hop-local

By default, the device does not set itself as the next hop for routes sent to a peer or peer group.

11.     Apply a routing policy to routes advertised to or received from a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } route-policy route-policy-name { export | import }

By default, no routing policy is applied.

Configuring nested VPN

Restrictions and guidelines

When you configure nested VPN, follow these guidelines:

·     The address spaces of sub-VPNs of a VPN cannot overlap.

·     Do not assign nested VPN peers addresses that public network peers use.

·     Nested VPN does not support multihop EBGP. A provider PE and a provider CE must use the addresses of the directly connected interfaces to establish a neighbor relationship.

Procedure

1.     Connect the customer CE to the customer PE:

a.     Configure VPN instances on the customer PE.

See "Configuring VPN instances."

b.     Configure route exchange between customer PE and customer CE.

See "Configuring routing between a PE and a CE."

2.     Configure the customer PE to exchange sub-VPN routing information with the provider CE:

a.     Configure BGP VPNv4 route exchange between customer PE and provider CE.

See "Configuring routing between PEs."

b.     Execute the following commands in sequence to configure the provider CE to receive all VPNv4 routes (not filter VPNv4 routes by route targets).

system-view

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

address-family vpnv4

undo policy vpn-target

By default, route target filtering is enabled for received VPNv4 routes. Only VPNv4 routes whose export route target attribute matches the local import route target attribute are added to the routing table.

This step is not required in a nested VPN network when no provider CE is deployed and the customer PE is connected directly to the provider PE.

3.     Connect the provider CE to the provider PE:

a.     Configure VPN instances on the provider PE.

See "Configuring VPN instances."

b.     Configure route exchange between the provider CE and provider PE.

See "Configuring routing between a PE and a CE."

4.     Configure BGP VPNv4 route exchange between the provider PE and provider CE:

This step contains only configurations on the provider PE. For information about configuring the provider CE, see "Configuring routing between PEs." If the customer PE is directly connected to the provider PE, you must configure provider CE settings on the customer PE because the PE also functions as a provider CE.

a.     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP VPNv4 address family view:

system-view

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

address-family vpnv4

b.     Enable nested VPN.

nesting-vpn

By default, nested VPN is disabled.

c.     Return to BGP instance view.

quit

d.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

e.     Configure the provider CE as a BGP peer.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

f.     Create BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family and enter BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

g.     Enable BGP VPNv4 route exchange with the peer CE or the peer group of the peer CE.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange VPNv4 routes with any peer.

h.     (Optional.) Configure the SoO attribute for the BGP peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } soo site-of-origin

By default, the SoO attribute is not configured.

5.     Configure BGP VPNv4 route exchange between provider PEs.

See "Configuring routing between PEs."

Configuring HoVPN

Configuring the UPE

Configure basic MPLS L3VPN settings on the UPE.

Configuring the SPE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Specify a BGP peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } as-number as-number

4.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

5.     Enable BGP VPNv4 route exchange with the peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, BGP does not exchange VPNv4 routes with any peer.

6.     Specify the BGP peer or peer group as a UPE.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } upe

By default, no peer is a UPE.

7.     Advertise routes to the UPE.

¡     Advertise a default VPN route to the UPE.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } default-route-advertise vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

The device advertises a default route using the local address as the next hop to the UPE, regardless of whether the default route exists in the local routing table.

¡     Advertise routes permitted by a routing policy to the UPE.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } upe route-policy route-policy-name export

By default, no route is advertised to the UPE.

Do not configure both commands.

8.     Return to BGP instance view.

quit

9.     Create a BGP-VPN instance and enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

You do not need to associate the VPN instance to an interface on the SPE.

This step adds the learned VPNv4 routes to the BGP routing table of the VPN instance.

Specifying the VPN label processing mode on the egress PE

About VPN label processing modes

An egress PE can process VPN labels in either POPGO or POP mode:

·     POPGO forwarding—Pops the label and forwards the packet out of the output interface corresponding to the label.

·     POP forwarding—Pops the label and forwards the packet through the FIB table.

Restrictions and guidelines

The POPGO forwarding mode (vpn popgo) and per-VPN instance label allocation mode (label-allocation-mode per-vrf) are mutually exclusive. Do not configure both modes in a BGP instance. For more information about the label-allocation-mode command, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Specify the VPN label processing mode as POPGO forwarding.

vpn popgo

The default is POP forwarding.

Configuring MPLS L3VPN FRR

About MPLS L3VPN FRR

You can use the following methods to configure MPLS L3VPN FRR:

·     Method 1—Execute the pic command in BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view. The device calculates a backup next hop for each BGP route in the VPN instance if there are two or more unequal-cost routes to reach the destination.

·     Method 2—Execute the fast-reroute route-policy command in BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view to use a routing policy. In the routing policy, specify a backup next hop by using the apply fast-reroute backup-nexthop command. The backup next hop calculated by the device must be the same as the specified backup next hop. Otherwise, the device does not generate a backup next hop for the primary route. You can also configure if-match clauses in the routing policy to identify the routes protected by FRR.

If both methods are configured, Method 2 takes precedence over Method 1.

Restrictions and guidelines

Executing the pic command in BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view might cause routing loops. Use it with caution.

Configuring FRR by using a routing policy

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure BFD.

¡     Enable MPLS BFD.

mpls bfd enable

By default, MPLS BFD is disabled.

The mpls bfd enable command applies to VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route and IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route.

For more information about this command, see MPLS Command Reference.

¡     Configure the source IP address for BFD echo packets.

bfd echo-source-ip ip-address

By default, the source IP address for BFD echo packets is not configured.

This command is required when echo-mode BFD is used to detect primary route connectivity in VPNv4 route backup for an IPv4 route. For more information about this command, see High Availability Command Reference.

3.     Use BFD to test the connectivity of an LSP or MPLS TE tunnel.

¡     Configure BFD to test the connectivity of the LSP for the specified FEC.

mpls bfd dest-addr mask-length [ nexthop nexthop-address [ discriminator local local-id remote remote-id ] ] [ template template-name ]

¡     Configure BFD to test the connectivity of the MPLS TE tunnel for the tunnel interface.

interface tunnel number mode mpls-te

mpls bfd [ discriminator local local-id remote remote-id ] [ template template-name ]

quit

By default, BFD is not configured to test the connectivity of the LSP or MPLS TE tunnel.

This step is required for VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route and IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route.

For more information about the commands in this step, see MPLS Command Reference.

4.     Configure a routing policy:

a.     Create a routing policy and enter routing policy view.

route-policy route-policy-name permit node node-number

b.     Set the backup next hop for FRR.

apply fast-reroute backup-nexthop ip-address

By default, no backup next hop address is set for FRR.

c.     Return to system view.

quit

For more information about the commands, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

5.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

6.     (Optional.) Use echo-mode BFD to detect the connectivity to the next hop of the primary route.

primary-path-detect bfd echo

By default, ARP is used to detect the connectivity to the next hop.

Use this command if necessary in VPNv4 route backup an IPv4 route.

For more information about this command, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

7.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

8.     Enter BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

9.     Apply a routing policy to FRR.

fast-reroute route-policy route-policy-name

By default, no routing policy is applied to FRR.

The apply fast-reroute backup-nexthop command can take effect in the routing policy that is being used. Other apply commands do not take effect.

For more information about the command, see BGP commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Enabling MPLS L3VPN FRR for BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure BFD.

¡     Enable MPLS BFD.

mpls bfd enable

By default, MPLS BFD is disabled.

This command applies to VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route and IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route. For more information about this command, see MPLS OAM commands in MPLS Command Reference.

¡     Configure the source IP address for BFD echo packets.

bfd echo-source-ip ip-address

By default, the source IP address for BFD echo packets is not configured.

This command is required when echo-mode BFD is used to detect primary route connectivity in VPNv4 route backup for an IPv4 route. For more information about this command, see BFD commands in High Availability Command Reference.

3.     Use BFD to test the connectivity of an LSP or MPLS TE tunnel.

¡     Use BFD to test the connectivity of the LSP for the specified FEC.

mpls bfd dest-addr mask-length [ nexthop nexthop-address [ discriminator local local-id remote remote-id ] ] [ template template-name ]

¡     Use BFD to test the connectivity of the MPLS TE tunnel for the tunnel interface.

interface tunnel number mode mpls-te

mpls bfd [ discriminator local local-id remote remote-id ] [ template template-name ]

quit

By default, BFD is not used to test the connectivity of the LSP or MPLS TE tunnel.

This command applies to VPNv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route and IPv4 route backup for a VPNv4 route.

For more information about the commands, see MPLS OAM commands in MPLS Command Reference.

4.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

5.     (Optional.) Use echo-mode BFD to detect the connectivity to the next hop of the primary route.

primary-path-detect bfd echo

By default, ARP is used to detect the connectivity to the next hop.

Use this command if necessary in VPNv4 route backup an IPv4 route.

For more information about this command, see BGP commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

6.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

7.     Enter BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

8.     Enable MPLS L3VPN FRR for the address family.

pic

By default, MPLS L3VPN FRR is disabled.

For more information about this command, see BGP commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Configuring an OSPF sham link

About OSPF sham links

When a backdoor link exists between the two sites of a VPN, you can create a sham link between PEs to forward VPN traffic through the sham link on the backbone rather than the backdoor link. A sham link is considered an OSPF intra-area route.

The source and destination addresses of the sham link must be loopback interface addresses with 32-bit masks. The loopback interfaces must be bound to VPN instances, and their addresses are advertised through BGP.

Prerequisites

Before you configure an OSPF sham link, perform the following tasks:

·     Configure basic MPLS L3VPN (OSPF is used between PE and CE).

·     Configure OSPF in the LAN where customer CEs reside.

Redistributing the loopback interface address

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a loopback interface and enter loopback interface view.

interface loopback interface-number

3.     Associate the loopback interface with a VPN instance.

ip binding vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

By default, the interface is not associated with any VPN instances and belongs to the public network.

4.     Configure an IP address for the loopback interface.

ip address ip-address { mask-length | mask }

By default, no IP address is configured for the loopback interface.

5.     Return to system view.

quit

6.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

7.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

8.     Enter BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

9.     Redistribute direct routes into BGP (including the loopback interface route).

import-route direct

By default, no direct routes are redistributed into BGP.

Creating a sham link

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter OSPF view.

ospf [ process-id | router-id router-id | vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] *

As a best practice, specify a router ID.

3.     Set the external route tag for imported VPN routes.

route-tag tag-value

By default, if BGP runs within an MPLS backbone, and the BGP AS number is not greater than 65535, the first two octets of the external route tag are 0xD000 and the last two octets are the local BGP AS number. If the AS number is greater than 65535, the external route tag is 0.

4.     Enter OSPF area view.

area area-id

5.     Configure a sham link.

sham-link source-ip-address destination-ip-address [ cost cost-value | dead dead-interval | hello hello-interval | { authentication-none | { hmac-md5 | md5 } [ key-id { cipher | plain } string ] | keychain keychain-name | retransmit retrans-interval | simple [ { cipher | plain } string } ] | trans-delay delay | ttl-security hops hop-count ] *

Configuring BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute

About BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute

When CEs at different sites have the same AS number, configure the BGP AS number substitution feature to avoid route loss.

When a PE uses different interfaces to connect different CEs in a site, the BGP AS number substitution feature introduces a routing loop. To remove the routing loop, configure the SoO attribute on the PE.

For more information about the BGP AS number substitution feature and the SoO attribute, see "BGP AS number substitution and SoO attribute."

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP-VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

4.     Enable the BGP AS number substitution feature.

peer { ipv4-address [ mask-length ] | group-name } substitute-as

By default, BGP AS number substitution is disabled.

5.     Enter BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

6.     (Optional.) Configure the SoO attribute for a BGP peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } soo site-of-origin

By default, the SoO attribute is not configured.

Configuring BGP RT filtering

About BGP RT filtering

The BGP RT filtering feature reduces the number of routes advertised in an MPLS L3VPN.

After RT filtering is configured, a PE advertises its import target attribute to the peer PEs in the RT filter address family. The peer PEs use the received import target attribute to filter routes and advertise only the routes that match the attribute to the PE.

When a large number of IBGP peers exist, the BGP RT filtering and the route reflection features are used together as a best practice. Route reflection reduces the number of IBGP connections. BGP RT filtering reduces the number of routes advertised in the network.

For more information about the BGP RT filtering commands, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP IPv4 RT filter address family view.

address-family ipv4 rtfilter

4.     Enable the device to exchange routing information with a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } enable

By default, the device cannot exchange routing information with a peer or peer group.

5.     (Optional.) Advertise a default route to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } default-route-advertise [ route-policy route-policy-name ]

By default, no default route is advertised.

6.     (Optional.) Set a preferred value for routes received from a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } preferred-value value

By default, the preferred value for routes received from a peer or peer group is 0.

7.     (Optional.) Configure the device as a route reflector and specify a peer or peer group as its client.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } reflect-client

By default, no route reflector or client is configured.

8.     (Optional.) Enable route reflection between clients.

reflect between-clients

By default, route reflection between clients is enabled.

9.     (Optional.) Configure the cluster ID of the route reflector.

reflector cluster-id { cluster-id | ipv4-address }

By default, a route reflector uses its own router ID as the cluster ID.

10.     (Optional.) Set the optimal route selection delay timer.

route-select delay delay-value

By default, the optimal route selection delay timer is 0 seconds, which means optimal route selection is not delayed.

Configuring the BGP additional path feature

About the BGP additional path feature

By default, BGP advertises only one optimal route. When the optimal route fails, traffic forwarding will be interrupted until route convergence completes.

The BGP additional path (Add-Path) feature enables BGP to advertise multiple routes with the same prefix and different next hops to a peer or peer group. When the optimal route fails, the suboptimal route becomes the optimal route, which shortens the traffic interruption time.

You can enable the BGP additional path sending, receiving, or both sending and receiving capabilities on a BGP peer. For two BGP peers to successfully negotiate the additional path capabilities, make sure one end has the sending capability and the other end has the receiving capability.

For more information about the BGP additional path configuration commands, see BGP commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view or BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family view.

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP VPNv4 address family view:

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

address-family vpnv4

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family view:

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

address-family vpnv4

3.     Configure the BGP additional path capabilities.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } additional-paths { receive | send } *

By default, no BGP additional path capabilities are configured.

4.     Set the maximum number of Add-Path optimal routes that can be advertised to a peer or peer group.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } advertise additional-paths best number

By default, a maximum of one Add-Path optimal route can be advertised to a peer or peer group.

5.     Set the maximum total number of Add-Path optimal routes that can be advertised to all peers.

additional-paths select-best best-number

By default, a maximum total number of one Add-Path optimal route can be advertised to all peers.

This command is not supported in BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family view.

Specifying a local network to be advertised in the public instance or a VPN instance

About specifying a local network to be advertised

This feature specifies a local network of the public instance or a VPN instance. Then, you can configure BGP to redistribute the network (by using the import-route local-aggregate command) and advertise the network. For more information about the import-route local-aggregate command, see BGP commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Restrictions and guidelines

The specified local network route must exist and be active in the routing table of the public instance or VPN instance.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter public instance IPv4 address family view or VPN instance IPv4 address family view.

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter public instance IPv4 address family view:

ip public-instance

address-family ipv4

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter VPN instance IPv4 address family view:

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

address-family ipv4

3.     Specify a local network to be advertised.

network ipv4-address [ mask-length | mask ]

By default, no local network in the public instance or a VPN instance will be advertised.

Configuring BGP VPNv4 routes to use private network next hops

About configuring BGP VPNv4 routes to use private network next hops

By default, the next hop address of a BGP VPNv4 route is a public address. This feature changes the next hop of a BGP VPNv4 route received from a peer or peer group to an IP address in the VPN instance.

Restrictions and guidelines

After you configure this feature, the following applies:

·     The device re-establishes the BGP sessions to the specified peer or to all peers in the specified peer group.

·     The device receives a BGP VPNv4 route only when its RD is the same as a local RD.

·     When advertising a BGP VPNv4 route, the device does not use the route target attribute of the VPN instance to replace the original route target attribute of the route.

·     If you delete a VPN instance or delete the RD of a VPN instance, the received BGP VPNv4 routes in the VPN instance will be deleted.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP VPNv4 address family view:

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

address-family vpnv4

3.     Change the next hop of a BGP VPNv4 route received from a peer or peer group to a VPN instance address.

peer { group-name | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] } next-hop-vpn

By default, the device does not change the next hop of a received BGP VPNv4 route, and the next hop belongs to the public network.

Configuring route replication

About route redistribution

In a BGP/MPLS L3VPN network, only VPN instances that have matching route targets can communicate with each other.

The route replication feature provides the following functions:

·     Enables a VPN instance to communicate with the public network or other VPN instances by replicating routes from the public network or other VPN instances.

·     Enables the public network to communicate with a VPN instance by replicating routes from the VPN instance.

In an intelligent traffic control network, traffic of different tenants is assigned to different VPNs. To enable the tenants to communicate with the public network, configure this feature to replicate routes from the public network to the VPN instances.

Replicating routes from the public network or VPN instances to a VPN instance

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter VPN instance view.

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

3.     Enter VPN instance IPv4 address family view.

address-family ipv4

4.     Replicate routes from the public network or other VPN instances.

route-replicate from { public | vpn-instance vpn-instance-name } protocol { direct | static | bgp4+ as-number | { isisv6 | ospfv3 | ripng } process-id } [ advertise ] [ route-policy route-policy-name ]

By default, a VPN instance cannot replicate routes from the public network or other VPN instances.

Replicating routes from a VPN instance to the public network

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter public instance view.

ip public-instance

3.     Enter public instance IPv4 address family view.

address-family ipv4

4.     Replicate routes from a VPN instance to the public network.

route-replicate from vpn-instance vpn-instance-name protocol { direct | static | bgp4+ as-number | { isisv6 | ospfv3 | ripng } process-id } [ advertise ] [ route-policy route-policy-name ]

By default, the public network cannot replicate routes from VPN instances.

Enabling ECMP VPN route redistribution

About ECMP VPN route redistribution

For multiple routes that have the same prefix and RD, a VPN instance redistributes only the optimal route into its routing table by default. This feature enables a VPN instance to redistribute all routes that have the same prefix and RD into its routing table to perform load sharing or MPLS L3VPN FRR.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter a BGP address family view.

¡     Enter BGP IPv4 unicast address family view.

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

¡     Enter BGP IPv6 unicast address family view.

address-family ipv6 [ unicast ]

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP-VPN IPv4 unicast address family view:

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

address-family ipv4 [ unicast ]

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP-VPN IPv6 unicast address family view:

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

address-family ipv6 [ unicast ]

4.     Enable ECMP VPN route redistribution.

vpn-route cross multipath

By default, ECMP VPN route redistribution is disabled. If multiple routes have the same prefix and RD, a VPN instance redistributes only the optimal route into its routing table.

In BGP IPv4 unicast address family view and BGP IPv6 unicast address family view, this command redistributes ECMP routes to the routing table of the public instance. For more information about the public instance, see EVPN Configuration Guide.

Enabling prioritized withdrawal of specific routes

About prioritized withdrawal of specific routes

This feature enables BGP to send the withdrawal messages of specific routes prior to other routes. This can achieve fast switchover of traffic on the specified routes to available routes to reduce the traffic interruption time.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP instance view.

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

3.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view.

address-family vpnv4

4.     Enable prioritized withdrawal of the routes that match the specified routing policy.

update-first route-policy route-policy-name

By default, BGP does not send the withdrawal messages of specific routes prior to other routes.

Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN

About SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN

To report critical MPLS L3VPN events to an NMS, enable SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN. For MPLS L3VPN event notifications to be sent correctly, you must also configure SNMP on the device. For more information about SNMP configuration, see the network management and monitoring configuration guide for the device.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN.

snmp-agent trap enable l3vpn

By default, SNMP notifications for MPLS L3VPN are enabled.

Enabling logging for BGP route flapping

About logging for BGP route flapping

This feature enables BGP to generate logs for BGP route flappings that trigger log generation. The generated logs are sent to the information center. For the logs to be output correctly, you must also configure information center on the device. For more information about the information center, see Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter BGP VPNv4 address family view or BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family view.

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP VPNv4 address family view:

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

address-family vpnv4

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to enter BGP-VPN VPNv4 address family view:

bgp as-number [ instance instance-name ]

ip vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

address-family vpnv4

3.     Enable logging for BGP route flapping.

log-route-flap monitor-time monitor-count [ log-count-limit | route-policy route-policy-name ] *

By default, logging for BGP route flapping is disabled.

Display and maintenance commands for MPLS L3VPN

Resetting BGP connections

You can soft-reset or reset BGP sessions to apply new BGP configurations. A soft reset operation updates BGP routing information without tearing down BGP connections. A reset operation updates BGP routing information by tearing down, and then re-establishing BGP connections. Soft reset requires that BGP peers have route refresh capability.

Execute the following commands in user view to soft reset or reset BGP connections:

 

Task

Command

Soft-reset BGP sessions for the VPNv4 address family.

refresh bgp [ instance instance-name ] { ipv4-address [ mask-length ] | all | external | group group-name | internal } { export | import } vpnv4 [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ]

Soft-reset BGP sessions for the BGP IPv4 RT filter family.

refresh bgp [ instance instance-name ] { ipv4-address [ mask-length ] | all | external | group group-name | internal } { export | import } ipv4 rtfilter

Reset BGP sessions for the VPNv4 address family.

reset bgp [ instance instance-name ] { as-number | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] | all | external | internal | group group-name } vpnv4 [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ]

Reset BGP sessions for the BGP IPv4 RT filter family.

reset bgp [ instance instance-name ] { as-number | ipv4-address [ mask-length ] | all | external | internal | group group-name } ipv4 rtfilter

 

For more information about the refresh bgp vpnv4 and reset bgp vpnv4 commands, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Displaying MPLS L3VPN information

Execute the following commands in any view to display MPLS L3VPN:

 

Task

Command

Display BGP RT filter peer group information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] group ipv4 rtfilter [ group-name group-name ]

Display BGP VPNv4 peer group information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] group vpnv4 [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] [ group-name group-name ]

Display BGP RT filter information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] ipv4 rtfilter [ peer ipv4-address [ statistics ] | statistics ]

Display BGP RT filter peer information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] peer ipv4 rtfilter [ ipv4-address mask-length | { ipv4-address | group-name group-name } log-info | [ ipv4-address ] verbose ]

Display BGP VPNv4 peer information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] peer vpnv4 [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] [ ipv4-address mask-length | { ipv4-address | group-name group-name } log-info | [ ipv4-address ] verbose ]

Display incoming labels for BGP IPv4 unicast routes.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] routing-table ipv4 [ unicast ] [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] inlabel

Display outgoing labels for BGP IPv4 unicast routes.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] routing-table ipv4 [ unicast ] [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] outlabel

Display BGP RT filter routing information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] routing-table ipv4 rtfilter [ default-rt [ advertise-info ] | [ origin-as as-number ] [ route-target [ advertise-info ] ] | peer ipv4-address { advertised-routes | received-routes } [ default-rt | [ origin-as as-number ] [ route-target ] | statistics ] | statistics ]

Display BGP VPNv4 routes.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] routing-table vpnv4 [ [ route-distinguisher route-distinguisher ] [ ipv4-address [ { mask-length | mask } [ longest-match ] ] | ipv4-address [ mask-length | mask ] advertise-info | as-path-acl as-path-acl-number | community-list { { basic-community-list-number | comm-list-name } [ whole-match ] | adv-community-list-number } ] | [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] peer ipv4-address { advertised-routes | received-routes } [ ipv4-address [ mask-length | mask ] | statistics ] | statistics ]

Display incoming labels for BGP VPNv4 routes.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] routing-table vpnv4 inlabel

Display outgoing labels for BGP VPNv4 routes.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] routing-table vpnv4 outlabel

Display BGP IPv4 RT filter address family update group information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] update-group ipv4 rtfilter [ ipv4-address ]

Display BGP VPNv4 address family update group information.

display bgp [ instance instance-name ] update-group vpnv4 [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] [ ipv4-address ]

Display the FIB of a VPN instance.

display fib vpn-instance vpn-instance-name

Display FIB entries that match the specified destination IP address in the specified VPN instance.

display fib vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ip-address [ mask-length | mask ]

Display the routing table for a VPN instance.

display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn-instance-name [ statistics | verbose ]

Display information about a specific or all VPN instances.

display ip vpn-instance [ instance-name vpn-instance-name ]

Display OSPF sham link information.

display ospf [ process-id ] sham-link [ area area-id ]

 

For more information about the display ip routing-table, display bgp group vpnv4, display bgp peer vpnv4, and display bgp update-group vpnv4 commands, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

MPLS L3VPN configuration examples

Example: Configuring basic MPLS L3VPN

Network configuration

CE 1 and CE 3 belong to VPN 1. CE 2 and CE 4 belong to VPN 2.

VPN 1 uses route target attribute 111:1. VPN 2 uses route target attribute 222:2. Users of different VPNs cannot access each other.

EBGP is used to exchange VPN routing information between CE and PE.

PEs use OSPF to communicate with each other and use MP-IBGP to exchange VPN routing information.

Figure 24 Network diagram

 

Table 1 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 1

Vlan-int11

10.1.1.1/24

P

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

PE 1

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

 

Vlan-int12

172.2.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int11

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int13

172.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int13

172.1.1.1/24

PE 2

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

Vlan-int12

10.2.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

172.2.1.2/24

CE 2

Vlan-int12

10.2.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int11

10.3.1.2/24

CE 3

Vlan-int11

10.3.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int13

10.4.1.2/24

CE 4

Vlan-int13

10.4.1.1/24

 

 

 

 

Procedure

1.     Configure an IGP on the MPLS backbone to ensure IP connectivity within the backbone:

# Configure PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 13

[PE1-Vlan-interface13] ip address 172.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface13] quit

[PE1] ospf

[PE1-ospf-1] area 0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[PE1-ospf-1] quit

# Configure the P device.

<P> system-view

[P] interface loopback 0

[P-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[P-LoopBack0] quit

[P] interface vlan-interface 13

[P-Vlan-interface13] ip address 172.1.1.2 24

[P-Vlan-interface13] quit

[P] interface vlan-interface 12

[P-Vlan-interface12] ip address 172.2.1.1 24

[P-Vlan-interface12] quit

[P] ospf

[P-ospf-1] area 0

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[P-ospf-1] quit

# Configure PE 2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] interface loopback 0

[PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack0] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 172.2.1.2 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

[PE2] ospf

[PE2-ospf-1] area 0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[PE2-ospf-1] quit

# Execute the display ospf peer command to verify that OSPF adjacencies in Full state have been established between PE 1, P, and PE 2. Execute the display ip routing-table command to verify that the PEs have learned the routes to the loopback interfaces of each other. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP on the MPLS backbone to establish LDP LSPs:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 13

[PE1-Vlan-interface13] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface13] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface13] quit

# Configure the P device.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls ldp

[P-ldp] quit

[P] interface vlan-interface 13

[P-Vlan-interface13] mpls enable

[P-Vlan-interface13] mpls ldp enable

[P-Vlan-interface13] quit

[P] interface vlan-interface 12

[P-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[P-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[P-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-ldp] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Execute the display mpls ldp peer command to verify that LDP sessions in Operational state have been established between PE 1, P, and PE 2. Execute the display mpls ldp lsp command to verify that the LSPs have been established by LDP. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure VPN instances on PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 111:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] route-distinguisher 100:2

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] vpn-target 222:2

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn2

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.2.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 111:1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] route-distinguisher 200:2

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] vpn-target 222:2

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 10.3.1.2 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 13

[PE2-Vlan-interface13] ip binding vpn-instance vpn2

[PE2-Vlan-interface13] ip address 10.4.1.2 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface13] quit

# Configure IP addresses for the CEs according to Figure 24. (Details not shown.)

# Execute the display ip vpn-instance command on the PEs to display the configuration of the VPN instance, for example, on PE 1.

[PE1] display ip vpn-instance

  Total VPN-Instances configured : 2

  VPN-Instance Name               RD                     Create time

  vpn1                            100:1                  2012/02/13 12:49:08

  vpn2                            100:2                  2012/02/13 12:49:20

# Use the ping command on the PEs to verify that the PEs can ping their attached CEs, for example, on PE 1.

[PE1] ping -vpn-instance vpn1 10.1.1.1

Ping 10.1.1.1 (10.1.1.1): 56 data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=1.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=2.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=1.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=255 time=0.000 ms

 

--- Ping statistics for 10.1.1.1 ---

5 packet(s) transmitted, 5 packet(s) received, 0.0% packet loss

round-trip min/avg/max/std-dev = 0.000/0.800/2.000/0.748 ms

4.     Establish EBGP peer relationships between PEs and CEs, and redistribute VPN routes into BGP:

# Configure CE 1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] bgp 65410

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 10.1.1.2 as-number 100

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.1.1.2 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure the other three CEs in the same way that CE 1 is configured. (Details not shown.)

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 as-number 65410

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn2] peer 10.2.1.1 as-number 65420

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn2] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn2] peer 10.2.1.1 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn2] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn2] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2 in the same way that PE 1 is configured. (Details not shown.)

# Execute the display bgp peer ipv4 vpn-instance command on the PEs to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between a PE and a CE. (Details not shown.)

5.     Establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship between PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] bgp 100

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE2-bgp-default] quit

# Execute the display bgp peer vpnv4 command on the PEs to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between the PEs. (Details not shown.)

Verifying the configuration

# Execute the display ip routing-table vpn-instance command on the PEs.

[PE1] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 13        Routes : 13

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost         NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32          Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.0/24         Direct 0    0            10.1.1.2        Vlan11

10.1.1.0/32         Direct 0    0            10.1.1.2        Vlan11

10.1.1.2/32         Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.255/32       Direct 0    0            10.1.1.2        Vlan11

10.3.1.0/24         BGP    255  0            3.3.3.9         Vlan13

127.0.0.0/8         Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32        Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32        Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32  Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4         Direct 0    0            0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24        Direct 0    0            0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32  Direct 0    0            127.0.0.1       InLoop0

The output shows that PE 1 has a route to the remote CE. Output on PE 2 is similar.

# Verify that CEs of the same VPN can ping each other, whereas those of different VPNs cannot. For example, CE 1 can ping CE 3 (10.3.1.1) but cannot ping CE 4 (10.4.1.1). (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring a hub-spoke network

Network configuration

The Spoke-CEs cannot communicate directly. They can communicate only through Hub-CE.

Configure EBGP between the Spoke-CEs and Spoke-PEs and between Hub-CE and Hub-PE to exchange VPN routing information.

Configure OSPF between the Spoke-PEs and Hub-PE to implement communication between the PEs, and configure MP-IBGP between them to exchange VPN routing information.

Figure 25 Network diagram

 

Table 2 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Spoke-CE 1

Vlan-int2

10.1.1.1/24

Hub-CE

Vlan-int6

10.3.1.1/24

Spoke-PE 1

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

 

Vlan-int7

10.4.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

10.1.1.2/24

Hub-PE

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

 

Vlan-int4

172.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int4

172.1.1.2/24

Spoke-CE 2

Vlan-int3

10.2.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int5

172.2.1.2/24

Spoke-PE 2

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

Vlan-int6

10.3.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int3

10.2.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int7

10.4.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int5

172.2.1.1/24

 

 

 

 

Procedure

1.     Configure an IGP on the MPLS backbone to ensure IP connectivity within the backbone:

# Configure Spoke-PE 1.

<Spoke-PE1> system-view

[Spoke-PE1] interface loopback 0

[Spoke-PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[Spoke-PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[Spoke-PE1] interface vlan-interface 4

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface4] ip address 172.1.1.1 24

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface4] quit

[Spoke-PE1] ospf

[Spoke-PE1-ospf-1] area 0

[Spoke-PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[Spoke-PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[Spoke-PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[Spoke-PE1-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Spoke-PE 2.

<Spoke-PE2> system-view

[Spoke-PE2] interface loopback 0

[Spoke-PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[Spoke-PE2-LoopBack0] quit

[Spoke-PE2] interface vlan-interface 5

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface5] ip address 172.2.1.1 24

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface5] quit

[Spoke-PE2] ospf

[Spoke-PE2-ospf-1] area 0

[Spoke-PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[Spoke-PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

[Spoke-PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[Spoke-PE2-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Hub-PE.

<Hub-PE> system-view

[Hub-PE] interface loopback 0

[Hub-PE-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[Hub-PE-LoopBack0] quit

[Hub-PE] interface vlan-interface 4

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface4] ip address 172.1.1.2 24

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface4] quit

[Hub-PE] interface vlan-interface 5

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface5] ip address 172.2.1.2 24

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface5] quit

[Hub-PE] ospf

[Hub-PE-ospf-1] area 0

[Hub-PE-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[Hub-PE-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[Hub-PE-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[Hub-PE-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[Hub-PE-ospf-1] quit

# Execute the display ospf peer command on the devices to verify that OSPF adjacencies in Full state have been established between Spoke-PE 1, Spoke-PE 2, and Hub-PE. Execute the display ip routing-table command on the devices to verify that the PEs have learned the routes to the loopback interfaces of each other. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP on the MPLS backbone to establish LDP LSPs:

# Configure Spoke-PE 1.

[Spoke-PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[Spoke-PE1] mpls ldp

[Spoke-PE1-ldp] quit

[Spoke-PE1] interface vlan-interface 4

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface4] mpls enable

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface4] mpls ldp enable

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface4] quit

# Configure Spoke-PE 2.

[Spoke-PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[Spoke-PE2] mpls ldp

[Spoke-PE2-ldp] quit

[Spoke-PE2] interface vlan-interface 5

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface5] mpls enable

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface5] mpls ldp enable

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface5] quit

# Configure Hub-PE.

[Hub-PE] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[Hub-PE] mpls ldp

[Hub-PE-ldp] quit

[Hub-PE] interface vlan-interface 4

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface4] mpls enable

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface4] mpls ldp enable

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface4] quit

[Hub-PE] interface vlan-interface 5

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface5] mpls enable

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface5] mpls ldp enable

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface5] quit

# Execute the display mpls ldp peer command on the devices to verify that LDP sessions in Operational state have been established between Spoke-PE 1, Spoke-PE 2, and Hub-PE. Execute the display mpls ldp lsp command on the devices to verify that the LSPs have been established by LDP. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure VPN instances on the Spoke-PEs and Hub-PE:

# Configure Spoke-PE 1.

[Spoke-PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[Spoke-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[Spoke-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 111:1 import-extcommunity

[Spoke-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 222:2 export-extcommunity

[Spoke-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[Spoke-PE1] interface vlan-interface 2

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface2] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface2] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[Spoke-PE1-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Configure Spoke-PE 2.

[Spoke-PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[Spoke-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:2

[Spoke-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 111:1 import-extcommunity

[Spoke-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 222:2 export-extcommunity

[Spoke-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[Spoke-PE2] interface vlan-interface 3

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface3] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface3] ip address 10.2.1.2 24

[Spoke-PE2-Vlan-interface3] quit

# Configure Hub-PE.

[Hub-PE] ip vpn-instance vpn1-in

[Hub-PE-vpn-instance-vpn1-in] route-distinguisher 100:3

[Hub-PE-vpn-instance-vpn1-in] vpn-target 222:2 import-extcommunity

[Hub-PE-vpn-instance-vpn1-in] quit

[Hub-PE] ip vpn-instance vpn1-out

[Hub-PE-vpn-instance-vpn1-out] route-distinguisher 100:4

[Hub-PE-vpn-instance-vpn1-out] vpn-target 111:1 export-extcommunity

[Hub-PE-vpn-instance-vpn1-out] quit

[Hub-PE] interface vlan-interface 6

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface6] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1-in

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface6] ip address 10.3.1.2 24

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface6] quit

[Hub-PE] interface vlan-interface 7

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface7] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1-out

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface7] ip address 10.4.1.2 24

[Hub-PE-Vlan-interface7] quit

# Configure IP addresses for the CEs according to Table 2. (Details not shown.)

# Execute the display ip vpn-instance command on the PEs to display the configuration of the VPN instance, for example, on Spoke-PE 1.

[Spoke-PE1] display ip vpn-instance

  Total VPN-Instances configured : 1

  VPN-Instance Name               RD                     Create time

  vpn1                            100:1                  2009/04/08 10:55:07

# Use the ping command on the PEs to verify that the PEs can ping their attached CEs, for example, on Spoke-PE 1.

[Spoke-PE1] ping -vpn-instance vpn1 10.1.1.1

Ping 10.1.1.1 (10.1.1.1): 56 data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=128 time=1.913 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=128 time=2.381 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=128 time=1.707 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=128 time=1.666 ms

56 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=128 time=2.710 ms

 

--- Ping statistics for 10.1.1.1 ---

5 packet(s) transmitted, 5 packet(s) received, 0.0% packet loss

round-trip min/avg/max/std-dev = 1.666/2.075/2.710/0.406 ms

4.     Establish EBGP peer relationships between the PEs and CEs, and redistribute VPN routes into BGP:

# Configure Spoke-CE 1.

<Spoke-CE1> system-view

[Spoke-CE1] bgp 65410

[Spoke-CE1-bgp-default] peer 10.1.1.2 as-number 100

[Spoke-CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4

[Spoke-CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.1.1.2 enable

[Spoke-CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[Spoke-CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[Spoke-CE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Spoke-CE 2.

<Spoke-CE2> system-view

[Spoke-CE2] bgp 65420

[Spoke-CE2-bgp-default] peer 10.2.1.2 as-number 100

[Spoke-CE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4

[Spoke-CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.2.1.2 enable

[Spoke-CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[Spoke-CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[Spoke-CE2-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Hub-CE.

<Hub-CE> system-view

[Hub-CE] bgp 65430

[Hub-CE-bgp-default] peer 10.3.1.2 as-number 100

[Hub-CE-bgp-default] peer 10.4.1.2 as-number 100

[Hub-CE-bgp-default] address-family ipv4

[Hub-CE-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.3.1.2 enable

[Hub-CE-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.4.1.2 enable

[Hub-CE-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[Hub-CE-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[Hub-CE-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Spoke-PE 1.

[Spoke-PE1] bgp 100

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 as-number 65410

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 enable

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Spoke-PE 2.

[Spoke-PE2] bgp 100

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.2.1.1 as-number 65420

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.2.1.1 enable

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Hub-PE.

[Hub-PE] bgp 100

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1-in

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpn1-in] peer 10.3.1.1 as-number 65430

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpn1-in] address-family ipv4

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1-in] peer 10.3.1.1 enable

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1-in] quit

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpn1-in] quit

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1-out

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpn1-out] peer 10.4.1.1 as-number 65430

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpn1-out] address-family ipv4

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1-out] peer 10.4.1.1 enable

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1-out] peer 10.4.1.1 allow-as-loop 2

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1-out] quit

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpn1-out] quit

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] quit

# Execute the display bgp peer ipv4 vpn-instance command on the PEs to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between a PE and a CE. (Details not shown.)

5.     Establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship between the Spoke-PEs and Hub-PE:

# Configure Spoke-PE 1.

[Spoke-PE1] bgp 100

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[Spoke-PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Spoke-PE 2.

[Spoke-PE2] bgp 100

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[Spoke-PE2-bgp-default] quit

# Configure Hub-PE.

[Hub-PE] bgp 100

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[Hub-PE-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[Hub-PE-bgp-default] quit

# Execute the display bgp peer vpnv4 command on the PEs to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between the PEs. (Details not shown.)

Verifying the configuration

# Execute the display ip routing-table vpn-instance command on the PEs to display the routes to the CEs. This example uses Spoke-PE 1 to verify that the next hop of the route from a Spoke-PE to its connected Spoke-CE is Hub-PE.

[Spoke-PE1] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 15        Routes : 15

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan2

10.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan2

10.1.1.2/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan2

10.2.1.0/24        BGP     255 0           2.2.2.9         Vlan4

10.3.1.0/24        BGP     255 0           2.2.2.9         Vlan4

10.4.1.0/24        BGP     255 0           2.2.2.9         Vlan4

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that Spoke-CE 1 and Spoke-CE 2 can ping each other. The TTL value indicates that traffic from Spoke-CE 1 to Spoke-CE 2 passes six hops (255-250+1) and is forwarded through Hub-CE. This example uses Spoke-CE 1 to verify their connectivity.

[Spoke-CE1] ping 10.2.1.1

Ping 10.2.1.1 (10.2.1.1): 56 data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

56 bytes from 10.2.1.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=250 time=1.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.2.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=250 time=2.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.2.1.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=250 time=0.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.2.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=250 time=1.000 ms

56 bytes from 10.2.1.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=250 time=0.000 ms

 

--- Ping statistics for 10.2.1.1 ---

5 packet(s) transmitted, 5 packet(s) received, 0.0% packet loss

round-trip min/avg/max/std-dev = 0.000/0.800/2.000/0.748 ms

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option A

Network configuration

CE 1 and CE 2 belong to the same VPN. CE 1 accesses the network through PE 1 in AS 100, and CE 2 accesses the network through PE 2 in AS 200.

Configure MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option A, and use the VRF-to-VRF method to manage VPN routes.

Run OSPF on the MPLS backbone in each AS.

Figure 26 Network diagram

 

Table 3 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 1

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.1/24

CE 2

Vlan-int12

10.2.1.1/24

PE 1

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.2.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

172.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

162.1.1.2/24

ASBR-PE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

ASBR-PE 2

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

172.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int11

162.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

192.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

192.1.1.2/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure IGP on the MPLS backbone to implement the connectivity in the backbone.

This example uses OSPF. (Details not shown.)

# Execute the display ospf peer command to verify that each ASBR-PE has established an OSPF adjacency in Full state with the PE in the same AS, and that PEs and ASBR-PEs in the same AS have learned the routes to the loopback interfaces of each other. Verify that each ASBR-PE and the PE in the same AS can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP on the MPLS backbone to establish LDP LSPs:

# Configure basic MPLS on PE 1, and enable MPLS LDP on the interface connected to ASBR-PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure basic MPLS on ASBR-PE 1, and enable MPLS LDP on the interface connected to PE 1.

<ASBR-PE1> system-view

[ASBR-PE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[ASBR-PE1] mpls ldp

[ASBR-PE1-ldp] quit

[ASBR-PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure basic MPLS on ASBR-PE 2, and enable MPLS LDP on the interface connected to PE 2.

<ASBR-PE2> system-view

[ASBR-PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[ASBR-PE2] mpls ldp

[ASBR-PE2-ldp] quit

[ASBR-PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure basic MPLS on PE 2, and enable MPLS LDP on the interface connected to ASBR-PE 2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-ldp] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Execute the display mpls ldp peer command on the devices to verify that the session status is Operational, and that each PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS have established a neighbor relationship. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure VPN instances on PEs:

For the same VPN, the route targets for the VPN instance on the PE must match those for the VPN instance on the ASBR-PE in the same AS. This is not required for PEs in different ASs.

# Configure CE 1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:2

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 100:1 both

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure CE 2.

<CE2> system-view

[CE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.2.1.1 24

[CE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:2

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 200:1 both

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.2.1.2 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# On ASBR-PE 1, create a VPN instance, and bind the instance to the interface connected to ASBR-PE 2. ASBR-PE 1 considers ASBR-PE 2 to be its CE.

[ASBR-PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[ASBR-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[ASBR-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 100:1 both

[ASBR-PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[ASBR-PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 192.1.1.1 24

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# On ASBR-PE 2, create a VPN instance, and bind the instance to the interface connected to ASBR-PE 1. ASBR-PE 2 considers ASBR-PE 1 to be its CE.

[ASBR-PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[ASBR-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[ASBR-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 200:1 both

[ASBR-PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[ASBR-PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 192.1.1.2 24

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Execute the display ip vpn-instance command to display VPN instance configurations. Verify that the PEs can ping the CEs, and the ASBR-PEs can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

4.     Establish EBGP peer relationships between PEs and CEs, and redistribute VPN routes into BGP:

# Configure CE 1.

[CE1] bgp 65001

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 10.1.1.2 as-number 100

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.1.1.2 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 as-number 65001

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure CE 2.

[CE2] bgp 65002

[CE2-bgp-default] peer 10.2.1.2 as-number 200

[CE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.2.1.2 enable

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE2-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.2.1.1 as-number 65002

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.2.1.1 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE2-bgp-default] quit

5.     Establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship between each PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS, and an EBGP peer relationship between the ASBR-PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 next-hop-local

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE 1.

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 192.1.1.2 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 192.1.1.2 enable

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 next-hop-local

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE 2.

[ASBR-PE2] bgp 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 192.1.1.1 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 192.1.1.1 enable

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 next-hop-local

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 200

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 next-hop-local

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE2-bgp-default] quit

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the CEs can learn the interface routes from each other and ping each other. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option B

Network configuration

Site 1 and Site 2 belong to the same VPN. CE 1 of Site 1 accesses the network through PE 1 in AS 100. CE 2 of Site 2 accesses the network through PE 2 in AS 600. PEs in the same AS run IS-IS.

PE 1 and ASBR-PE 1 exchange VPNv4 routes through MP-IBGP. PE 2 and ASBR-PE 2 exchange VPNv4 routes through MP-IBGP. ASBR-PE 1 and ASBR-PE 2 exchange VPNv4 routes through MP-EBGP.

ASBRs do not perform route target filtering of received VPN-IPv4 routes.

Figure 27 Network diagram

 

Table 4 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

PE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

5.5.5.9/32

 

Vlan-int12

30.0.0.1/8

 

Vlan-int12

20.0.0.1/8

 

Vlan-int11

1.1.1.2/8

 

Vlan-int11

9.1.1.2/8

ASBR-PE 1

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

ASBR-PE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

1.1.1.1/8

 

Vlan-int11

9.1.1.1/8

 

Vlan-int12

11.0.0.2/8

 

Vlan-int12

11.0.0.1/8

 

Procedure

1.     Configure PE 1:

# Configure IS-IS on PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] isis 1

[PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.111.111.111.111.00

[PE1-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 1.1.1.2 255.0.0.0

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

# Create VPN instance vpn1, and configure the RD and route target attributes.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 11:11

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 2:2 3:3 import-extcommunity

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 3:3 export-extcommunity

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

# Bind the interface connected to CE 1 to the created VPN instance.

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 30.0.0.1 8

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Enable BGP on PE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

# Configure IBGP peer 3.3.3.9 as a VPNv4 peer.

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Redistribute direct routes to the VPN routing table of vpn1.

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] import-route direct

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

2.     Configure ASBR-PE 1:

# Enable IS-IS on ASBR-PE 1.

<ASBR-PE1> system-view

[ASBR-PE1] isis 1

[ASBR-PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.222.222.222.222.00

[ASBR-PE1-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[ASBR-PE1] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[ASBR-PE1] mpls ldp

[ASBR-PE1-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[ASBR-PE1] interface vlan-interface11

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 1.1.1.1 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 12, and enable MPLS on it.

[ASBR-PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 11.0.0.2 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[ASBR-PE1] interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[ASBR-PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE1-LoopBack0] quit

# Enable BGP on ASBR-PE 1.

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 11.0.0.1 as-number 600

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 11.0.0.1 connect-interface vlan-interface 12

# Disable route target based filtering of received VPNv4 routes.

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] undo policy vpn-target

# Configure both IBGP peer 2.2.2.0 and EBGP peer 11.0.0.1 as VPNv4 peers.

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 11.0.0.1 enable

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

3.     Configure ASBR-PE 2:

# Enable IS-IS on ASBR-PE 2.

<ASBR-PE2> system-view

[ASBR-PE2] isis 1

[ASBR-PE2-isis-1] network-entity 10.222.222.222.222.00

[ASBR-PE2-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[ASBR-PE2] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[ASBR-PE2] mpls ldp

[ASBR-PE2-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[ASBR-PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 9.1.1.1 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 12, and enable MPLS on it.

[ASBR-PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 11.0.0.1 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[ASBR-PE2] interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 4.4.4.9 32

[ASBR-PE2-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE2-LoopBack0] quit

# Enable BGP on ASBR-PE 2.

[ASBR-PE2] bgp 600

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 11.0.0.2 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 11.0.0.2 connect-interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 as-number 600

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 connect-interface loopback 0

# Disable route target based filtering of received VPNv4 routes.

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] undo policy vpn-target

# Configure both IBGP peer 5.5.5.9 and EBGP peer 11.0.0.2 as VPNv4 peers.

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 11.0.0.2 enable

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 5.5.5.9 enable

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] quit

4.     Configure PE 2:

# Enable IS-IS on PE 2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] isis 1

[PE2-isis-1] network-entity 10.111.111.111.111.00

[PE2-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 5.5.5.9

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 9.1.1.2 255.0.0.0

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[PE2] interface loopback 0

[PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 5.5.5.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE2-LoopBack0] quit

# Create VPN instance vpn1, and configure the RD and route target attributes.

[PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 12:12

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 2:2 3:3 import-extcommunity

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 3:3 export-extcommunity

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

# Bind the interface connected to CE 2 to the created VPN instance.

[PE2] interface vlan-interface12

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 20.0.0.1 8

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Enable BGP on PE 2.

[PE2] bgp 600

# Configure IBGP peer 4.4.4.9 as a VPNv4 peer.

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 600

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Redistribute direct routes to the VPN routing table of vpn1.

[PE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] import-route direct

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE2-bgp-default] quit

Verifying the configuration

# Use the following command on PE 1 to verify its connectivity to PE 2.

[PE1] ping -a 30.0.0.1 -vpn-instance vpn1 20.0.0.1

Ping 20.0.0.1 (20.0.0.1) from 30.0.0.1: 56 data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

56 bytes from 20.0.0.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=1.208 ms

56 bytes from 20.0.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.867 ms

56 bytes from 20.0.0.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.551 ms

56 bytes from 20.0.0.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.566 ms

56 bytes from 20.0.0.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=255 time=0.570 ms

 

--- Ping statistics for 20.0.0.1 ---

5 packet(s) transmitted, 5 packet(s) received, 0.0% packet loss

round-trip min/avg/max/std-dev = 0.551/0.752/1.208/0.257 ms

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN inter-AS option C

Network configuration

Site 1 and Site 2 belong to the same VPN. Site 1 accesses the network through PE 1 in AS 100. Site 2 accesses the network through PE 2 in AS 600. PEs in the same AS run IS-IS.

PE 1 and ASBR-PE 1 exchange labeled IPv4 routes through IBGP. PE 2 and ASBR-PE 2 exchange labeled IPv4 routes through IBGP. PE 1 and PE 2 exchange VPNv4 routes through MP-EBGP.

ASBR-PE 1 and ASBR-PE 2 use their respective routing policies and label routes received from each other.

ASBR-PE 1 and ASBR-PE 2 use EBGP to exchange labeled IPv4 routes.

Figure 28 Network diagram

 

Table 5 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

PE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

5.5.5.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

1.1.1.2/8

 

Vlan-int11

9.1.1.2/8

 

Vlan-int12

30.0.0.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

20.0.0.1/24

ASBR-PE 1

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

ASBR-PE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

1.1.1.1/8

 

Vlan-int11

9.1.1.1/8

 

Vlan-int12

11.0.0.2/8

 

Vlan-int12

11.0.0.1/8

CE 1

Vlan-int12

30.0.0.2/24

CE 2

Vlan-int12

20.0.0.2/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure CE 1:

# Configure an IP address for VLAN-interface 12.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 30.0.0.2 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with PE 1, and redistribute VPN routes.

[CE1] bgp 65001

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 30.0.0.1 as-number 100

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 30.0.0.1 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

2.     Configure PE 1:

# Configure IS-IS on PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] isis 1

[PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.111.111.111.111.00

[PE1-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 1.1.1.2 255.0.0.0

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

# Create VPN instance vpn1, and configure the RD and route target attributes.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 11:11

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 2:2 3:3 import-extcommunity

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 3:3 export-extcommunity

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

# Associate VLAN-interface 12 with VPN instance vpn1, and specify the IP address for the interface.

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 30.0.0.1 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Enable BGP on PE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

# Enable the capability to advertise labeled routes to IBGP peer 3.3.3.9 and to receive labeled routes from the peer.

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 3.3.3.9 label-route-capability

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

# Configure the maximum hop count from PE 1 to EBGP peer 5.5.5.9 as 10.

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 as-number 600

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 ebgp-max-hop 10

# Configure peer 5.5.5.9 as a VPNv4 peer.

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 5.5.5.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with CE 1, and add the learned BGP routes to the routing table of VPN instance vpn1.

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 30.0.0.2 as-number 65001

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 30.0.0.2 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

3.     Configure ASBR-PE 1:

# Enable IS-IS on ASBR-PE 1.

<ASBR-PE1> system-view

[ASBR-PE1] isis 1

[ASBR-PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.222.222.222.222.00

[ASBR-PE1-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[ASBR-PE1] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[ASBR-PE1] mpls ldp

[ASBR-PE1-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[ASBR-PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 1.1.1.1 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 12, and enable MPLS on it.

[ASBR-PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 11.0.0.2 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[ASBR-PE1] interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[ASBR-PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE1-LoopBack0] quit

# Create routing policies.

[ASBR-PE1] route-policy policy1 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy-policy1-1] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy-policy1-1] quit

[ASBR-PE1] route-policy policy2 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy-policy2-1] if-match mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy-policy2-1] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy-policy2-1] quit

# Enable BGP on ASBR-PE 1, and apply the routing policy policy2 to routes advertised to IBGP peer 2.2.2.9.

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 2.2.2.9 route-policy policy2 export

# Enable the capability to advertise labeled routes to IBGP peer 2.2.2.9 and to receive labeled routes from the peer.

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 2.2.2.9 label-route-capability

# Redistribute routes from IS-IS process 1 to BGP.

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route isis 1

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

# Apply the routing policy policy1 to routes advertised to EBGP peer 11.0.0.1.

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] peer 11.0.0.1 as-number 600

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.0.0.1 enable

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.0.0.1 route-policy policy1 export

# Enable the capability to advertise labeled routes to EBGP peer 11.0.0.1 and to receive labeled routes from the peer.

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.0.0.1 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-default] quit

4.     Configure ASBR-PE 2:

# Enable IS-IS on ASBR-PE 2.

<ASBR-PE2> system-view

[ASBR-PE2] isis 1

[ASBR-PE2-isis-1] network-entity 10.222.222.222.222.00

[ASBR-PE2-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[ASBR-PE2] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[ASBR-PE2] mpls ldp

[ASBR-PE2-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[ASBR-PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 9.1.1.1 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[ASBR-PE2] interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 4.4.4.9 32

[ASBR-PE2-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[ASBR-PE2-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 12, and enable MPLS on it.

[ASBR-PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 11.0.0.1 255.0.0.0

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[ASBR-PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Create routing policies.

[ASBR-PE2] route-policy policy1 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy-policy1-1] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy-policy1-1] quit

[ASBR-PE2] route-policy policy2 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy-policy2-1] if-match mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy-policy2-1] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy-policy2-1] quit

# Enable BGP on ASBR-PE 2, and enable the capability to advertise labeled routes to IBGP peer 5.5.5.9 and to receive labeled routes from the peer.

[ASBR-PE2] bgp 600

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 as-number 600

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 5.5.5.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 5.5.5.9 enable

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 5.5.5.9 label-route-capability

# Apply routing policy policy2 to routes advertised to IBGP peer 5.5.5.9.

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 5.5.5.9 route-policy policy2 export

# Redistribute routes from IS-IS process 1 into BGP.

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route isis 1

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

# Apply routing policy policy1 to routes advertised to EBGP peer 11.0.0.2.

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] peer 11.0.0.2 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.0.0.2 enable

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.0.0.2 route-policy policy1 export

# Enable the capability to advertise labeled routes to EBGP peer 11.0.0.2 and to receive labeled routes from the peer.

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.0.0.2 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-default] quit

5.     Configure PE 2:

# Enable IS-IS on PE 2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] isis 1

[PE2-isis-1] network-entity 10.111.111.111.111.00

[PE2-isis-1] quit

# Configure the LSR ID, and enable MPLS and LDP.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 5.5.5.9

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-ldp] quit

# Configure VLAN-interface 11, and enable IS-IS, MPLS, and LDP on the interface.

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 9.1.1.2 255.0.0.0

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 1

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure Loopback 0, and enable IS-IS on it.

[PE2] interface loopback 0

[PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 5.5.5.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE2-LoopBack0] quit

# Create VPN instance vpn1, and configure the RD and route target attributes.

[PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 11:11

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 2:2 3:3 import-extcommunity

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 3:3 export-extcommunity

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

# Associate VLAN-interface 12 with VPN instance vpn1, and specify the IP address for the interface.

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 20.0.0.1 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Enable BGP on PE 2.

[PE2] bgp 600

# Enable the capability to advertise labeled routes to IBGP peer 4.4.4.9 and to receive labeled routes from the peer.

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 600

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 4.4.4.9 label-route-capability

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

# Configure the maximum hop count from PE 2 to EBGP peer 2.2.2.9 as 10.

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 ebgp-max-hop 10

# Configure peer 2.2.2.9 as a VPNv4 peer.

[PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with CE 2, and add the learned BGP routes to the routing table of VPN instance vpn1.

[PE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 20.0.0.2 as-number 65002

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 20.0.0.2 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE2-bgp-default] quit

6.     Configure CE 2:

# Configure an IP address for VLAN-interface 12.

<CE2> system-view

[CE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 20.0.0.2 24

[CE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with PE 2, and redistribute VPN routes.

[CE2] bgp 65002

[CE2-bgp-default] peer 20.0.0.1 as-number 600

[CE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 20.0.0.1 enable

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE2-bgp-default] quit

Verifying the configuration

# Execute the display ip routing table command on CE 1 and CE 2 to verify that CE 1 and CE 2 have a route to each other. Verify that CE 1 and CE 2 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN carrier's carrier in the same AS

Network configuration

Configure carrier's carrier for the scenario shown in Figure 29. In this scenario:

·     PE 1 and PE 2 are the provider carrier's PE switches. They provide VPN services for the customer carrier.

·     CE 1 and CE 2 are the customer carrier's switches. They are connected to the provider carrier's backbone as CE switches.

·     PE 3 and PE 4 are the customer carrier's PE switches. They provide MPLS L3VPN services for the end customers.

·     CE 3 and CE 4 are customers of the customer carrier.

·     The customer carrier and the provider carrier reside in the same AS.

The key to carrier's carrier deployment is to configure exchange of two kinds of routes:

·     Exchange of the customer carrier's internal routes on the provider carrier's backbone.

·     Exchange of the end customers' VPN routes between PE 3 and PE 4, the PEs of the customer carrier. In this process, an MP-IBGP peer relationship must be established between PE 3 and PE 4.

Figure 29 Network diagram

 

Table 6 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 3

Vlan-int11

100.1.1.1/24

CE 4

Vlan-int11

120.1.1.1/24

PE 3

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

PE 4

Loop0

6.6.6.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

100.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

120.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

20.1.1.2/24

CE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

CE 2

Loop0

5.5.5.9/32

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

21.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

11.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

20.1.1.1/24

PE 1

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

11.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

30.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

30.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int11

21.1.1.1/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure MPLS L3VPN on the provider carrier backbone. Enable IS-IS as the IGP, enable LDP between PE 1 and PE 2, and establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship between the PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] isis 1

[PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0004.00

[PE1-isis-1] quit

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 30.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] isis enable 1

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2 in the same way that PE 1 is configured. (Details not shown.)

# On PE 1 or PE 2, execute the following commands:

¡     Execute the display mpls ldp peer command to verify that an LDP session in Operational state has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

¡     Execute the display bgp peer vpnv4 command to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

¡     Execute the display isis peer command to verify that the IS-IS neighbor relationship has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure the customer carrier network. Enable IS-IS as the IGP, and enable LDP between PE 3 and CE 1, and between PE 4 and CE 2:

# Configure PE 3.

<PE3> system-view

[PE3] interface loopback 0

[PE3-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE3-LoopBack0] quit

[PE3] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE3] mpls ldp

[PE3-ldp] quit

[PE3] isis 2

[PE3-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0001.00

[PE3-isis-2] quit

[PE3] interface loopback 0

[PE3-LoopBack0] isis enable 2

[PE3-LoopBack0] quit

[PE3] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] isis enable 2

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure CE 1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface loopback 0

[CE1-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[CE1-LoopBack0] quit

[CE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[CE1] mpls ldp

[CE1-ldp] quit

[CE1] isis 2

[CE1-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0002.00

[CE1-isis-2] quit

[CE1] interface loopback 0

[CE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 2

[CE1-LoopBack0] quit

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] isis enable 2

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

PE 3 and CE 1 can establish an LDP session and IS-IS neighbor relationship between them.

# Configure PE 4 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 3 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

3.     Allow CEs of the customer carrier to access PEs of the provider carrier, and redistribute IS-IS routes to BGP and BGP routes to IS-IS on the PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-ldp-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] isis 2 vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0003.00

[PE1-isis-2] address-family ipv4

[PE1-isis-2-ipv4] import-route bgp

[PE1-isis-2-ipv4] quit

[PE1-isis-2] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 11.1.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 2

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] import isis 2

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure CE 1.

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 11.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] isis enable 2

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

PE 1 and CE 1 can establish an LDP session and an IS-IS neighbor relationship between them.

# Configure PE 2 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 1 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

4.     Connect the CEs of the end customers and the PEs of the customer carrier:

# Configure CE 3.

<CE3> system-view

[CE3] interface vlan-interface11

[CE3-Vlan-interface11] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[CE3-Vlan-interface11] quit

[CE3] bgp 65410

[CE3-bgp-default] peer 100.1.1.2 as-number 100

[CE3-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 100.1.1.2 enable

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 3.

[PE3] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE3-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE3] interface Vlan-interface 11

[PE3-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE3-Vlan-interface11] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE3] bgp 100

[PE3-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE3-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 100.1.1.1 as-number 65410

[PE3-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 100.1.1.1 enable

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE3-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 4 and CE 4 in the same way that PE 3 and CE 3 are configured. (Details not shown.)

5.     Configure MP-IBGP peer relationship between the PEs of the customer carrier to exchange the end customers' VPN routes:

# Configure PE 3.

[PE3] bgp 100

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 6.6.6.9 as-number 100

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 6.6.6.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE3-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 6.6.6.9 enable

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 4 in the same way that PE 3 is configured. (Details not shown.)

Verifying the configuration

1.     Display the public network routing table and VPN routing table on the provider carrier PEs, for example, on PE 1:

# Verify that the public network routing table contains only routes of the provider carrier network.

[PE1] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 14        Routes : 14

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.3.3.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.4.4.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          30.1.1.2        Vlan12

30.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan12

30.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan12

30.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

30.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan12

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that the VPN routing table contains the internal routes of the customer carrier network, but it does not contain the VPN routes that the customer carrier maintains.

[PE1] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 18        Routes : 18

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

1.1.1.9/32         IS_L1   15  20          11.1.1.1        Vlan11

2.2.2.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          11.1.1.1        Vlan11

5.5.5.9/32         BGP     255 10          4.4.4.9         Vlan12

6.6.6.9/32         BGP     255 20          4.4.4.9         Vlan12

10.1.1.0/24        IS_L1   15  20          11.1.1.1        Vlan11

11.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

11.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

11.1.1.2/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

11.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

20.1.1.0/24        BGP     255 20          4.4.4.9         Vlan12

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.     Display the routing table on the customer carrier CEs, for example, on CE 1:

# Verify that the routing table contains the internal routes of the customer carrier network, but it does not contain the VPN routes that the customer carrier maintains.

[CE1] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 21        Routes : 21

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

1.1.1.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          10.1.1.1        Vlan12

2.2.2.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

5.5.5.9/32         IS_L2   15  74          11.1.1.2        Vlan11

6.6.6.9/32         IS_L2   15  74          11.1.1.2        Vlan11

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan12

10.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan12

10.1.1.2/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan12

11.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.1        Vlan11

11.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.1        Vlan11

11.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

11.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           11.1.1.1        Vlan11

20.1.1.0/24        IS_L2   15  74          11.1.1.2        Vlan11

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.     Display the public network routing table and VPN routing table on the customer carrier PEs, for example, on PE 3:

# Verify that the public network routing table contains the internal routes of the customer carrier network.

[PE3] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 18        Routes : 18

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

1.1.1.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.2.2.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

5.5.5.9/32         IS_L2   15  84          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

6.6.6.9/32         IS_L2   15  84          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        Vlan12

10.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        Vlan12

10.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        Vlan12

11.1.1.0/24        IS_L1   15  20          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

20.1.1.0/24        IS_L2   15  84          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that the VPN routing table contains the route to the remote VPN customer.

[PE3] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 13        Routes : 13

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.0/24       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan11

100.1.1.0/32       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan11

100.1.1.2/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.255/32     Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan11

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

120.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           6.6.6.9         Vlan12

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.     Verify that PE 3 and PE 4 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

5.     Verify that CE 3 and CE 4 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring MPLS L3VPN carrier's carrier in different ASs

Network configuration

Configure carrier's carrier for the scenario shown in Figure 30. In this scenario:

·     PE 1 and PE 2 are the provider carrier's PE switches. They provide VPN services for the customer carrier.

·     CE 1 and CE 2 are the customer carrier's switches. They are connected to the provider carrier's backbone as CE switches.

·     PE 3 and PE 4 are the customer carrier's PE switches. They provide MPLS L3VPN services for the end customers.

·     CE 3 and CE 4 are customers of the customer carrier.

·     The customer carrier and the provider carrier reside in different ASs.

The key to carrier's carrier deployment is to configure exchange of two kinds of routes:

·     Exchange of the customer carrier's internal routes on the provider carrier's backbone.

·     Exchange of the end customers' VPN routes between PE 3 and PE 4, the PEs of the customer carrier. In this process, an MP-EBGP peer relationship must be established between PE 3 and PE 4.

Figure 30 Network diagram

 

Table 7 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 3

Vlan-int11

100.1.1.1/24

CE 4

Vlan-int11

120.1.1.1/24

PE 3

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

PE 4

Loop0

6.6.6.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

100.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

120.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

20.1.1.2/24

CE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

CE 2

Loop0

5.5.5.9/32

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

21.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

11.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

20.1.1.1/24

PE 1

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

11.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

30.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

30.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int11

21.1.1.1/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure MPLS L3VPN on the provider carrier backbone. Enable IS-IS as the IGP, enable LDP between PE 1 and PE 2, and establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship between the PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] isis 1

[PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0004.00

[PE1-isis-1] quit

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 30.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] isis enable 1

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2 in the same way that PE 1 is configured. (Details not shown.)

# On PE 1 or PE 2, execute the following commands:

¡     Execute the display mpls ldp peer command to verify that an LDP session in Operational state has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

¡     Execute the display bgp peer vpnv4 command to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

¡     Execute the display isis peer command to verify that the IS-IS neighbor relationship has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure the customer carrier network. Enable IS-IS as the IGP, and enable LDP between PE 3 and CE 1, and between PE 4 and CE 2:

# Configure PE 3.

<PE3> system-view

[PE3] interface loopback 0

[PE3-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE3-LoopBack0] quit

[PE3] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE3] mpls ldp

[PE3-ldp] quit

[PE3] isis 2

[PE3-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0001.00

[PE3-isis-2] quit

[PE3] interface loopback 0

[PE3-LoopBack0] isis enable 2

[PE3-LoopBack0] quit

[PE3] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] isis enable 2

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[PE3-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure CE 1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface loopback 0

[CE1-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[CE1-LoopBack0] quit

[CE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[CE1] mpls ldp

[CE1-ldp] import bgp

[CE1-ldp] quit

[CE1] isis 2

[CE1-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0002.00

[CE1-isis-2] address-family ipv4

[CE1-isis-2-ipv4] import-route bgp

[CE1-isis-2-ipv4] quit

[CE1-isis-2] quit

[CE1] interface loopback 0

[CE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 2

[CE1-LoopBack0] quit

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] isis enable 2

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp transport-address interface

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

PE 3 and CE 1 can establish an LDP session and IS-IS neighbor relationship between them.

# Configure PE 4 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 3 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

3.     Allow CEs of the customer carrier to access PEs of the provider carrier:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 11.1.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE1] bgp 200

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 label-route-capability

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 route-policy csc export

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

[PE1] route-policy csc permit node 0

[PE1-route-policy-csc-0] apply mpls-label

[PE1-route-policy-csc-0] quit

# Configure CE 1.

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 11.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

[CE1] bgp 100

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 11.1.1.2 as-number 200

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.1.1.2 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.1.1.2 label-route-capability

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.1.1.2 route-policy csc export

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import isis 2

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

[CE1] route-policy csc permit node 0

[CE1-route-policy-csc-0] apply mpls-label

[CE1-route-policy-csc-0] quit

PE 1 and CE 1 can establish a BGP session and exchange labeled IPv4 unicast routes through BGP.

# Configure PE 2 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 1 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

4.     Connect CEs of the end customers and the PEs of the customer carrier:

# Configure CE 3.

<CE3> system-view

[CE3] interface vlan-interface 11

[CE3-Vlan-interface11] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[CE3-Vlan-interface11] quit

[CE3] bgp 65410

[CE3-bgp-default] peer 100.1.1.2 as-number 100

[CE3-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 100.1.1.2 enable

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 3.

[PE3] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE3-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE3] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE3-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE3-Vlan-interface11] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE3] bgp 100

[PE3-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE3-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 100.1.1.1 as-number 65410

[PE3-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 100.1.1.1 enable

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE3-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 4 and CE 4 in the same way that PE 3 and CE 3 are configured. (Details not shown.)

5.     Configure an MP-EBGP peer relationship between the PEs of the customer carrier to exchange the VPN routes of the end customers:

# Configure PE 3.

[PE3] bgp 100

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 6.6.6.9 as-number 300

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 6.6.6.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 6.6.6.9 ebgp-max-hop 10

[PE3-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 6.6.6.9 enable

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 4 in the same way that PE 3 is configured. (Details not shown.)

Verifying the configuration

1.     Display the public network routing table and VPN routing table on the provider carrier PEs, for example, on PE 1:

# Verify that the public network routing table contains only routes of the provider carrier network.

[PE1] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 14        Routes : 14

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.3.3.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.4.4.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          30.1.1.2        Vlan12

30.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan12

30.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan12

30.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

30.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan12

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that the VPN routing table contains the internal routes of the customer carrier, but it does not contain the VPN routes that the customer carrier maintains.

[PE1] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 14        Routes : 14

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

1.1.1.9/32         BGP     255 10          11.1.1.1        Vlan11

6.6.6.9/32         BGP     255 10          4.4.4.9         Vlan12

11.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

11.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

11.1.1.2/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

11.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.     Display the routing table on the customer carrier CEs, for example, on CE 1.

# Verify that the routing table contains the internal routes of the customer carrier network, but it does not contain the VPN routes that the customer carrier maintains.

[CE1] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 19        Routes : 19

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

1.1.1.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          10.1.1.1        Vlan12

2.2.2.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

6.6.6.9/32         BGP     255 0           11.1.1.2        Vlan11

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan12

10.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan12

10.1.1.2/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           10.1.1.2        Vlan12

11.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.1        Vlan11

11.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.1        Vlan11

11.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

11.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           11.1.1.1        Vlan11

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.     Display the public network routing table and VPN routing table on the customer carrier PEs, for example, on PE 3:

# Verify that the public network routing table contains the internal routes of the customer carrier network.

[PE3] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 15        Routes : 15

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

1.1.1.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.2.2.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

6.6.6.9/32         IS_L2   15  74          10.1.1.2        Vlan12

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        Vlan12

10.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        Vlan12

10.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        Vlan12

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that the VPN routing table contains the route to the remote VPN customer.

[PE3] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 13        Routes : 13

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.0/24       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan11

100.1.1.0/32       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan11

100.1.1.2/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.255/32     Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan11

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

120.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           6.6.6.9         Vlan12

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.     Verify that PE 3 and PE 4 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

5.     Verify that CE 3 and CE 4 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring nested VPN

Network configuration

The service provider provides nested VPN services for users, as shown in Figure 31.

·     PE 1 and PE 2 are PE devices on the service provider backbone. Both of them support the nested VPN feature.

·     CE 1 and CE 2 are connected to the service provider backbone. Both of them support VPNv4 routes.

·     PE 3 and PE 4 are PE devices of the customer VPN. Both of them support MPLS L3VPN.

·     CE 3 through CE 6 are CE devices of the sub-VPNs for the customer VPN.

The key of nested VPN configuration is to understand the processing of routes of sub-VPNs on the service provider PEs:

·     When receiving a VPNv4 route from a CE (CE 1 or CE 2 in this example), a service provider PE performs the following operations:

a.     Replaces the RD of the VPNv4 route with the RD of the MPLS VPN on the service provider network where the CE resides.

b.     Adds the export target attribute of the MPLS VPN on the service provider network to the extended community attribute list.

c.     Forwards the VPNv4 route.

·     To implement exchange of sub-VPN routes between customer PEs and service provider PEs, MP-EBGP peers must be established between service provider PEs and customer CEs.

Figure 31 Network diagram

 

Table 8 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

CE 2

Loop0

5.5.5.9/32

 

Vlan-int2

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int1

21.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int1

11.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

20.1.1.1/24

CE 3

Vlan-int1

100.1.1.1/24

CE 4

Vlan-int1

120.1.1.1/24

CE 5

Vlan-int3

110.1.1.1/24

CE 6

Vlan-int3

130.1.1.1/24

PE 1

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int1

11.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int1

21.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

30.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

30.1.1.2/24

PE 3

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

PE 4

Loop0

6.6.6.9/32

 

Vlan-int1

100.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int1

120.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int2

10.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

20.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int3

110.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int3

130.1.1.2/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure MPLS L3VPN on the service provider backbone. Use IS-IS as the IGP protocol, enable LDP, and establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship between PE 1 and PE 2:

# Configure PE 1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] isis 1

[PE1-isis-1] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0004.00

[PE1-isis-1] quit

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 2

[PE1-Vlan-interface2] ip address 30.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface2] isis enable 1

[PE1-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface2] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface2] quit

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2 in the same way that PE 1 is configured. (Details not shown.)

# On PE 1 or PE 2, execute the following commands:

¡     Execute the display mpls ldp peer command to verify that an LDP session in Operational state has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

¡     Execute the display bgp peer vpnv4 command to verify that a BGP peer relationship in Established state has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

¡     Execute the display isis peer command to verify that the IS-IS neighbor relationship has been established between PE 1 and PE 2. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure the customer VPN. Use IS-IS as the IGP protocol, and enable LDP between PE 3 and CE 1, and between PE 4 and CE 2:

# Configure PE 3.

<PE3> system-view

[PE3] interface loopback 0

[PE3-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE3-LoopBack0] quit

[PE3] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE3] mpls ldp

[PE3-ldp] quit

[PE3] isis 2

[PE3-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0001.00

[PE3-isis-2] quit

[PE3] interface loopback 0

[PE3-LoopBack0] isis enable 2

[PE3-LoopBack0] quit

[PE3] interface vlan-interface 2

[PE3-Vlan-interface2] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface2] isis enable 2

[PE3-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[PE3-Vlan-interface2] mpls ldp enable

[PE3-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Configure CE 1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface loopback 0

[CE1-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[CE1-LoopBack0] quit

[CE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[CE1] mpls ldp

[CE1-ldp] quit

[CE1] isis 2

[CE1-isis-2] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0000.0002.00

[CE1-isis-2] quit

[CE1] interface loopback 0

[CE1-LoopBack0] isis enable 2

[CE1-LoopBack0] quit

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 2

[CE1-Vlan-interface2] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface2] isis enable 2

[CE1-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface2] mpls ldp enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface2] quit

An LDP session and an IS-IS neighbor relationship can be established between PE 3 and CE 1.

# Configure PE 4 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 3 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

3.     Connect CE 1 and CE 2 to service provider PEs:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 1

[PE1-Vlan-interface1] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface1] ip address 11.1.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface1] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface1] quit

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 as-number 200

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure CE 1.

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 1

[CE1-Vlan-interface1] ip address 11.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Vlan-interface1] mpls enable

[CE1-Vlan-interface1] quit

[CE1] bgp 200

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 11.1.1.2 as-number 100

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 11.1.1.2 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 1 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

4.     Connect sub-VPN CEs to the customer VPN PEs:

# Configure CE 3.

<CE3> system-view

[CE3] interface vlan-interface 1

[CE3-Vlan-interface1] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[CE3-Vlan-interface1] quit

[CE3] bgp 65410

[CE3-bgp-default] peer 100.1.1.2 as-number 200

[CE3-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 100.1.1.2 enable

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure CE 5.

<CE5> system-view

[CE5] interface vlan-interface 3

[CE5-Vlan-interface3] ip address 110.1.1.1 24

[CE5-Vlan-interface3] quit

[CE5] bgp 65411

[CE5-bgp-default] peer 110.1.1.2 as-number 200

[CE5-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE5-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 110.1.1.2 enable

[CE5-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE5-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE5-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 3.

[PE3] ip vpn-instance SUB_VPN1

[PE3-vpn-instance-SUB_VPN1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-SUB_VPN1] vpn-target 2:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-SUB_VPN1] quit

[PE3] interface vlan-interface 1

[PE3-Vlan-interface1] ip binding vpn-instance SUB_VPN1

[PE3-Vlan-interface1] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface1] quit

[PE3] ip vpn-instance SUB_VPN2

[PE3-vpn-instance-SUB_VPN2] route-distinguisher 101:1

[PE3-vpn-instance-SUB_VPN2] vpn-target 2:2

[PE3-vpn-instance-SUB_VPN2] quit

[PE3] interface vlan-interface 3

[PE3-Vlan-interface3] ip binding vpn-instance SUB_VPN2

[PE3-Vlan-interface3] ip address 110.1.1.2 24

[PE3-Vlan-interface3] quit

[PE3] bgp 200

[PE3-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance SUB_VPN1

[PE3-bgp-default-SUB_VPN1] peer 100.1.1.1 as-number 65410

[PE3-bgp-default-SUB_VPN1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-SUB_VPN1] peer 100.1.1.1 enable

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-SUB_VPN1] quit

[PE3-bgp-default-SUB_VPN1] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance SUB_VPN2

[PE3-bgp-default-SUB_VPN2] peer 100.1.1.1 as-number 65411

[PE3-bgp-default-SUB_VPN2] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-SUB_VPN2] peer 110.1.1.1 enable

[PE3-bgp-default-ipv4-SUB_VPN2] quit

[PE3-bgp-default-SUB_VPN2] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 4, CE 4, and CE 6 in the same way that PE 3, CE 3, and CE 5 are configured. (Details not shown.)

5.     Establish MP-EBGP peer relationships between service provider PEs and their CEs to exchange user VPNv4 routes:

# On PE 1, enable nested VPN and VPNv4 route exchange with CE 1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] nesting-vpn

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4-vpn1] peer 11.1.1.1 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Enable CE 1 to exchange VPNv4 routes with PE 1.

[CE1] bgp 200

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 11.1.1.2 enable

# Allow the local AS number to appear in the AS-PATH attribute of the routes received.

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 11.1.1.2 allow-as-loop 2

# Disable route target based filtering of received VPNv4 routes.

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] undo policy vpn-target

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 1 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

6.     Establish MP-IBGP peer relationships between sub-VPN PEs and CEs of the customer VPN to exchange VPNv4 routes of sub-VPNs:

# Configure PE 3.

[PE3] bgp 200

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 200

[PE3-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE3-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

# Allow the local AS number to appear in the AS-PATH attribute of the routes received.

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 allow-as-loop 2

[PE3-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE3-bgp-default] quit

# Configure CE 1.

[CE1] bgp 200

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 200

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] undo policy vpn-target

[CE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 4 and CE 2 in the same way that PE 3 and CE 1 are configured. (Details not shown.)

Verifying the configuration

1.     Display the public routing table and VPN routing table on the provider PEs, for example, on PE 1:

# Verify that the public routing table contains only routes on the service provider network.

[PE1] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 14        Routes : 14

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.3.3.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.4.4.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          30.1.1.2        Vlan2

30.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan2

30.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan2

30.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

30.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           30.1.1.1        Vlan2

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that the VPN routing table contains sub-VPN routes.

[PE1] display ip routing-table vpn-instance vpn1

 

Destinations : 17       Routes : 17

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

11.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan1

11.1.1.0/32        Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan1

11.1.1.2/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

11.1.1.255/32      Direct  0   0           11.1.1.2        Vlan1

100.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           11.1.1.1        Vlan1

110.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           11.1.1.1        Vlan1

120.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           4.4.4.9         Vlan2

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

130.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           4.4.4.9         Vlan2

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.     Display the VPNv4 routing table on the provider CEs, for example, on CE 1.

# Verify that the VPNv4 routing table on the customer VPN contains internal sub-VPN routes.

[CE1] display bgp routing-table vpnv4

 

 BGP local router ID is 2.2.2.9

 Status codes: * - valid, > - best, d - dampened, h - history,

               s - suppressed, S - stale, i - internal, e - external

               a - additional-path

               Origin: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

 

 Total number of routes from all PEs: 4

 

 Route distinguisher: 100:1

 Total number of routes: 1

 

     Network            NextHop         MED        LocPrf     PrefVal Path/Ogn

 

* >i 100.1.1.0/24       1.1.1.9         0          100        0       200 65410?

 

 Route distinguisher: 101:1

 Total number of routes: 1

 

     Network            NextHop         MED        LocPrf     PrefVal Path/Ogn

 

* >i 110.1.1.0/24       1.1.1.9         0          100        0       200 65411?

 

 Route distinguisher: 200:1

 Total number of routes: 1

 

     Network            NextHop         MED        LocPrf     PrefVal Path/Ogn

 

* >e 120.1.1.0/24       11.1.1.2                              0       100 200

                                                                      65420?

 

 Route Distinguisher: 201:1

 Total number of routes: 1

 

     Network            NextHop         MED        LocPrf     PrefVal Path/Ogn

 

* >e 130.1.1.0/24       11.1.1.2                              0       100 200

                                                                      65421?

3.     Display the VPN routing table on the customer PEs, for example, on PE 3:

# Verify that the VPN routing table contains routes sent by the provider PE to the sub-VPN.

[PE3] display ip routing-table vpn-instance SUB_VPN1

 

Destinations : 11        Routes : 11

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.0/24       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.2       Vlan1

100.1.1.2/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

120.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           2.2.2.9         Vlan2

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.     Display the routing table on the CEs of sub-VPNs in the customer VPN, for example, on CE 3 and CE 5:

# Verify that the routing table contains the route to the remote sub-VPN on CE 3.

[CE3] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 13        Routes : 13

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.0/24       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.1       Vlan1

100.1.1.0/32       Direct  0   0           100.1.1.1       Vlan1

100.1.1.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

100.1.1.255/32     Direct  0   0           100.1.1.1       Vlan1

120.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           100.1.1.2       Vlan1

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

# Verify that the routing table contains the route to the remote sub-VPN on CE 5.

[CE5] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 13        Routes : 13

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

0.0.0.0/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

110.1.1.0/24       Direct  0   0           110.1.1.1       Vlan1

110.1.1.0/32       Direct  0   0           110.1.1.1       Vlan1

110.1.1.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

110.1.1.255/32     Direct  0   0           110.1.1.1       Vlan1

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

130.1.1.0/24       BGP     255 0           110.1.1.2       Vlan1

224.0.0.0/4        Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

224.0.0.0/24       Direct  0   0           0.0.0.0         NULL0

255.255.255.255/32 Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

5.     Verify that CE 3 and CE 4 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

6.     Verify that CE5 and CE 6 can ping each other. (Details not shown.)

7.     Verify that CE 3 and CE 6 cannot ping each other. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring HoVPN

Network configuration

There are two levels of networks, the backbone and the MPLS VPN networks, as shown in Figure 32.

·     SPEs act as PEs to allow MPLS VPNs to access the backbone.

·     UPEs act as PEs of the MPLS VPNs to allow end users to access the VPNs.

·     Performance requirements for the UPEs are lower than those for the SPEs.

·     SPEs advertise routes permitted by the routing policies to UPEs, permitting CE 1 and CE 3 in VPN 1 to communicate with each other, and forbidding CE 2 and CE 4 in VPN 2 from communicating with each other.

Figure 32 Network diagram

 

Table 9 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 1

Vlan-int12

10.2.1.1/24

CE 3

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.1/24

CE 2

Vlan-int13

10.4.1.1/24

CE 4

Vlan-int13

10.3.1.1/24

UPE 1

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

UPE 2

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

172.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int11

172.2.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.2.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int13

10.4.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int13

10.3.1.2/24

SPE 1

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

SPE 2

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

Vlan-int11

172.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

172.2.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

180.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

180.1.1.2/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure UPE 1:

# Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP to establish LDP LSPs.

<UPE1> system-view

[UPE1] interface loopback 0

[UPE1-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[UPE1-LoopBack0] quit

[UPE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[UPE1] mpls ldp

[UPE1-ldp] quit

[UPE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[UPE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 172.1.1.1 24

[UPE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[UPE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[UPE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure the IGP protocol (OSPF, in this example).

[UPE1] ospf

[UPE1-ospf-1] area 0

[UPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[UPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[UPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[UPE1-ospf-1] quit

# Configure VPN instances vpn1 and vpn2, allowing CE 1 and CE 2 to access UPE 1.

[UPE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[UPE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[UPE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 100:1 both

[UPE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[UPE1] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[UPE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] route-distinguisher 100:2

[UPE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] vpn-target 100:2 both

[UPE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] quit

[UPE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[UPE1-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[UPE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.2.1.2 24

[UPE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

[UPE1] interface vlan-interface 13

[UPE1-Vlan-interface13] ip binding vpn-instance vpn2

[UPE1-Vlan-interface13] ip address 10.4.1.2 24

[UPE1-Vlan-interface13] quit

# Establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship with SPE 1.

[UPE1] bgp 100

[UPE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[UPE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[UPE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with CE 1.

[UPE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.2.1.1 as-number 65410

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[UPE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.2.1.1 enable

[UPE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with CE 2.

[UPE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpn2] peer 10.4.1.1 as-number 65420

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpn2] address-family ipv4 unicast

[UPE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn2] peer 10.4.1.1 enable

[UPE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn2] quit

[UPE1-bgp-default-vpn2] quit

[UPE1-bgp-default] quit

2.     Configure CE 1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.2.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

[CE1] bgp 65410

[CE1-bgp-default] peer 10.2.1.2 as-number 100

[CE1-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.2.1.2 enable

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE1-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE1-bgp-default] quit

3.     Configure CE 2.

<CE2> system-view

[CE2] interface vlan-interface 13

[CE2-Vlan-interface13] ip address 10.4.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE2-Vlan-interface13] quit

[CE2] bgp 65420

[CE2-bgp-default] peer 10.4.1.2 as-number 100

[CE2-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.4.1.2 enable

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE2-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE2-bgp-default] quit

4.     Configure UPE 2:

# Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP to establish LDP LSPs.

<UPE2> system-view

[UPE2] interface loopback 0

[UPE2-Loopback0] ip address 4.4.4.9 32

[UPE2-Loopback0] quit

[UPE2] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[UPE2] mpls ldp

[UPE2-ldp] quit

[UPE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[UPE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 172.2.1.1 24

[UPE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[UPE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[UPE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure the IGP protocol (OSPF, in this example).

[UPE2] ospf

[UPE2-ospf-1] area 0

[UPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[UPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 4.4.4.9 0.0.0.0

[UPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[UPE2-ospf-1] quit

# Configure VPN instances vpn1 and vpn2, allowing CE 3 and CE 4 to access UPE 2.

[UPE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[UPE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 300:1

[UPE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 100:1 both

[UPE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[UPE2] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[UPE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] route-distinguisher 400:2

[UPE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] vpn-target 100:2 both

[UPE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] quit

[UPE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[UPE2-Vlan-interface12] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[UPE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[UPE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

[UPE2] interface vlan-interface 13

[UPE2-Vlan-interface13] ip binding vpn-instance vpn2

[UPE2-Vlan-interface13] ip address 10.3.1.2 24

[UPE2-Vlan-interface13] quit

# Establish an MP-IBGP peer relationship with SPE 2.

[UPE2] bgp 100

[UPE2-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[UPE2-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[UPE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with CE 3.

[UPE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 as-number 65430

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[UPE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] peer 10.1.1.1 enable

[UPE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

# Establish an EBGP peer relationship with CE 4.

[UPE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpn2] peer 10.3.1.1 as-number 65440

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpn2] address-family ipv4 unicast

[UPE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn2] peer 10.3.1.1 enable

[UPE2-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn2] quit

[UPE2-bgp-default-vpn2] quit

[UPE2-bgp-default] quit

5.     Configure CE 3.

<CE3> system-view

[CE3] interface vlan-interface 12

[CE3-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE3-Vlan-interface12] quit

[CE3] bgp 65430

[CE3-bgp-default] peer 10.1.1.2 as-number 100

[CE3-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.1.1.2 enable

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE3-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE3-bgp-default] quit

6.     Configure CE 4.

<CE4> system-view

[CE4] interface vlan-interface 13

[CE4-Vlan-interface13] ip address 10.3.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE4-Vlan-interface13] quit

[CE4] bgp 65440

[CE4-bgp-default] peer 10.3.1.2 as-number 100

[CE4-bgp-default] address-family ipv4 unicast

[CE4-bgp-default-ipv4] peer 10.3.1.2 enable

[CE4-bgp-default-ipv4] import-route direct

[CE4-bgp-default-ipv4] quit

[CE4-bgp-default] quit

7.     Configure SPE 1:

# Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP to establish LDP LSPs.

<SPE1> system-view

[SPE1] interface loopback 0

[SPE1-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[SPE1-LoopBack0] quit

[SPE1] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[SPE1] mpls ldp

[SPE1-ldp] quit

[SPE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[SPE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 172.1.1.2 24

[SPE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[SPE1-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[SPE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

[SPE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[SPE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 180.1.1.1 24

[SPE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[SPE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[SPE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure the IGP protocol (OSPF, in this example).

[SPE1] ospf

[SPE1-ospf-1] area 0

[SPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[SPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[SPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 180.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[SPE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[SPE1-ospf-1] quit

# Configure VPN instances vpn1 and vpn2.

[SPE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[SPE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 500:1

[SPE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 100:1 both

[SPE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[SPE1] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[SPE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] route-distinguisher 700:1

[SPE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] vpn-target 100:2 both

[SPE1-vpn-instance-vpn2] quit

# Establish MP-IBGP peer relationships with SPE 2 and UPE 1, and specify UPE 1 as a UPE.

[SPE1] bgp 100

[SPE1-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[SPE1-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[SPE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[SPE1-bgp-default] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[SPE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 upe

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 next-hop-local

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Create BGP-VPN instances for VPN instances vpn1 and vpn2, so the VPNv4 routes learned according to the RT attributes can be added into the BGP routing tables of the corresponding VPN instances.

[SPE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[SPE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpn2] quit

[SPE1-bgp-default] quit

# Advertise to UPE 1 the routes permitted by a routing policy (the routes of CE 3).

[SPE1] ip prefix-list hope index 10 permit 10.1.1.1 24

[SPE1] route-policy hope permit node 0

[SPE1-route-policy-hope-0] if-match ip address prefix-list hope

[SPE1-route-policy-hope-0] quit

[SPE1] bgp 100

[SPE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[SPE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 upe route-policy hope export

8.     Configure SPE 2:

# Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP to establish LDP LSPs.

<SPE2> system-view

[SPE2] interface loopback 0

[SPE2-LoopBack0] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[SPE2-LoopBack0] quit

[SPE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[SPE2] mpls ldp

[SPE2-ldp] quit

[SPE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[SPE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 180.1.1.2 24

[SPE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[SPE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[SPE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

[SPE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[SPE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 172.2.1.2 24

[SPE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls enable

[SPE2-Vlan-interface11] mpls ldp enable

[SPE2-Vlan-interface11] quit

# Configure the IGP protocol (OSPF, in this example).

[SPE2] ospf

[SPE2-ospf-1] area 0

[SPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

[SPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[SPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 180.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[SPE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[SPE2-ospf-1] quit

# Configure VPN instances vpn1 and vpn2.

[SPE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[SPE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 600:1

[SPE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 100:1 both

[SPE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[SPE2] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[SPE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] route-distinguisher 800:1

[SPE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] vpn-target 100:2 both

[SPE2-vpn-instance-vpn2] quit

# Establish MP-IBGP peer relationships with SPE 1 and UPE 2, and specify UPE 2 as a UPE.

[SPE2] bgp 100

[SPE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 100

[SPE2-bgp-default] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[SPE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[SPE2-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[SPE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 enable

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 upe

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 next-hop-local

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

# Create BGP-VPN instances for VPN instances vpn1 and vpn2, so the VPNv4 routes learned according to the RT attributes can be added into the BGP routing tables of the corresponding VPN instances.

[SPE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[SPE2-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn2

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpn2] quit

[SPE2-bgp-default] quit

# Advertise to UPE 2 the routes permitted by a routing policy (the routes of CE 1).

[SPE2] ip prefix-list hope index 10 permit  10.2.1.1 24

[SPE2] route-policy hope permit node 0

[SPE2-route-policy-hope-0] if-match ip address prefix-list hope

[SPE2-route-policy-hope-0] quit

[SPE2] bgp 100

[SPE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[SPE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 4.4.4.9 upe route-policy hope export

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that CE 1 and CE3 can learn each other's interface routes and can ping each other. CE 2 and CE 4 cannot learn each other's interface routes and cannot ping each other. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring an OSPF sham link

Network configuration

As shown in Figure 33, CE 1 and CE 2 belong to VPN 1. Configure an OSPF sham link between PE 1 and PE 2 so traffic between the CEs is forwarded through the MPLS backbone instead of the backdoor link.

Figure 33 Network diagram

 

Table 10 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

CE 1

Vlan-int11

100.1.1.1/24

CE 2

Vlan-int11

120.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int13

20.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

30.1.1.2/24

PE 1

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

PE 2

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

 

Loop1

3.3.3.3/32

 

Loop1

5.5.5.5/32

 

Vlan-int11

100.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int11

120.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int12

10.1.1.2/24

Switch A

Vlan-int11

20.1.1.2/24

 

 

 

 

Vlan-int12

30.1.1.1/24

 

 

 

 

Procedure

1.     Configure OSPF on the customer networks:

# Configure conventional OSPF on CE 1, Switch A, and CE 2 to advertise subnet addresses of the interfaces (see Table 10). (Details not shown.)

# Set the cost value to 2 for both the link between CE 1 and Switch A, and the link between CE 2 and Switch A. (Details not shown.)

# Execute the display ip routing-table command to verify that CE 1 and CE 2 have learned the route to each other. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure MPLS L3VPN on the backbone:

# Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP on PE 1 to establish LDP LSPs.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface loopback 0

[PE1-LoopBack0] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack0] quit

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-ldp] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE1-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure PE 1 to take PE 2 as an MP-IBGP peer.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp-default] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE1-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 2.2.2.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure OSPF on PE 1.

[PE1]ospf 1

[PE1-ospf-1]area 0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0]network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0]network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0]quit

[PE1-ospf-1]quit

# Configure basic MPLS and MPLS LDP on PE 2 to establish LDP LSPs.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] interface loopback 0

[PE2-LoopBack0] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack0] quit

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-ldp] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 12

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] mpls ldp enable

[PE2-Vlan-interface12] quit

# Configure PE 2 to take PE 1 as an MP-IBGP peer.

[PE2] bgp 100

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[PE2-bgp-default] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 0

[PE2-bgp-default] address-family vpnv4

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-default-vpnv4] quit

[PE2-bgp-default] quit

# Configure OSPF on PE 2.

[PE2]ospf 1

[PE2-ospf-1]area 0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0]network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0]network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0]quit

[PE2-ospf-1]quit

3.     Configure PEs to allow CE access:

# Configure PE 1.

[PE1] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE1-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE1] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[PE1-Vlan-interface11] quit

[PE1] ospf 100 vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-ospf-100] domain-id 10

[PE1-ospf-100] area 1

[PE1-ospf-100-area-0.0.0.1] network 100.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE1-ospf-100-area-0.0.0.1] quit

[PE1-ospf-100] quit

[PE2] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp-default] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] address-family ipv4 unicast

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] import-route ospf 100

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] import-route direct

[PE1-bgp-default-ipv4-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default-vpn1] quit

[PE1-bgp-default] quit

# Configure PE 2.

[PE2] ip vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:2

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE2-vpn-instance-vpn1] quit

[PE2] interface vlan-interface 11

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip binding vpn-instance vpn1

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] ip address 120.1.1.2 24

[PE2-Vlan-interface11] quit