14-WLAN Configuration Guide (Fat AP)

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02-Radio management configuration
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Contents

Configuring radio management 2

About radio management 2

Radio mode· 2

Channel 2

Transmit power 3

Transmission rate· 3

MCS· 3

VHT-MCS· 6

Restrictions and guidelines: Radio management configuration· 11

Radio management tasks at a glance· 12

Enabling or disabling a radio interface· 12

Specifying a radio mode· 12

Configuring basic radio functions· 13

Specifying a working channel 13

Setting the antenna type· 13

Setting the antenna gain· 14

Setting the maximum transmit power 14

Configuring power lock· 14

Setting transmission rates· 15

Setting the beacon interval 16

Setting the DTIM interval 16

Specifying a collision avoidance mode· 16

Setting the RTS threshold· 17

Setting the fragmentation threshold· 17

Setting the hardware retransmission limits· 18

Setting the maximum number of clients that can associate with an AP· 18

Configuring access services for 802.11b clients· 19

Configuring 802.11g protection· 19

Configuring ANI 19

Setting the preamble type· 20

Setting the maximum transmission distance· 20

Enabling the continuous mode for a radio· 21

Performing on-demand channel usage measurement 21

Configuring 802.11n functions· 21

Configuring the A-MPDU aggregation method· 21

Configuring the A-MSDU aggregation method· 22

Configuring short GI 22

Configuring LDPC·· 23

Configuring STBC·· 23

Setting MCS indexes· 23

Configuring the client dot11n-only feature· 24

Setting the 802.11n bandwidth mode· 24

Specifying a MIMO mode· 25

Configuring energy saving· 25

Configuring 802.11n protection· 26

Configuring 802.11ac functions· 26

Setting NSSs· 26

Configuring the client dot11ac-only feature· 27

Setting the 802.11ac bandwidth mode· 28

Configuring TxBF· 29

Configuring the smart antenna feature· 30

Configuring error packet ratio optimization and retransmission ratio optimization· 31

Display and maintenance commands for radio management 31

Radio management configuration examples· 31

Example: Configuring basic radio functions· 31

Example: Configuring 802.11n· 33

Configuring radio management

About radio management

Radio frequency (RF) is a rate of electrical oscillation in the range of 300 KHz to 300 GHz. WLAN uses the 2.4 GHz band and 5 GHz band radio frequencies as the transmission media. The 2.4 GHz band includes radio frequencies from 2.4 GHz to 2.4835 GHz. The 5 GHz band includes radio frequencies from 5.150 GHz to 5.350 GHz and from 5.725 GHz to 5.850 GHz.

The term "radio frequency" or its abbreviation RF is also used as a synonym for "radio" in wireless communication.

 

 

NOTE:

The term "AP" in this document refers to MSR routers that offer WLAN services as fat APs. For more information, see "Compatibility of hardware and AP functionality."

Radio mode

IEEE defines the 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n, and 802.11ac radio modes. H3C defines an 802.11gac radio mode that enables 802.11ac radios to use the 2.4 GHz band.

 

 

NOTE:

·     802.11g, 802.11n, and 802.11ac are backward compatible.

·     The term "802.11ac" in this document includes 802.11gac unless otherwise specified.

Table 1 provides a comparison of these radio modes.

Table 1 Comparison of 802.11 standards

IEEE standard

Frequency band

Maximum rate

Indoor coverage

Outdoor coverage

802.11a

5 GHz

54 Mbps

About 50 meters (164.04 ft)

About 100 meters (328.08 ft)

802.11b

2.4 GHz

11 Mbps

About 300 meters (984.25 ft)

About 600 meters (1968.50 ft)

802.11g

2.4 GHz

54 Mbps

About 300 meters (984.25 ft)

About 600 meters (1968.50 ft)

802.11n

2.4 GHz or 5 GHz

600 Mbps

About 300 meters (984.25 ft)

About 600 meters (1968.50 ft)

802.11ac

5 GHz

6900 Mbps

About 30 meters (98.43 ft)

About 60 meters (196.85 ft)

802.11gac

2.4 GHz

1600 Mbps

About 100 meters (328.08 ft)

About 200 meters (656.17 ft)

 

Channel

A channel is a range of frequencies with a specific bandwidth.

The 2.4 GHz band has 14 channels. The bandwidth for each channel is 20 MHz and each two channels are spaced 5 MHz apart. Among the 14 channels, four groups of non-overlapping channels exist and the most commonly used one contains channels 1, 6, and 11.

The 5 GHz band can provide higher rates and is more immune to interference. There are 24 non-overlapping channels designated to the 5 GHz band. The channels are spaced 20 MHz apart with a bandwidth of 20 MHz. The available channels vary by country.

Transmit power

Transmit power reflects the signal strength of a wireless device. A higher transmit power enables a radio to cover a larger area but it brings more interference to adjacent devices. The signal strength decreases as the transmission distance increases.

Transmission rate

Transmission rate refers to the speed at which wireless devices transmit traffic. It varies by radio mode and spreading, coding, and modulation schemes. The following are rates supported by different types of radios:

·     802.11a—6 Mbps, 9 Mbps, 12 Mbps, 18 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 36 Mbps, 48 Mbps, and 54 Mbps.

·     802.11b—1 Mbps, 2 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps, and 11 Mbps.

·     802.11g—1 Mbps, 2 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps, 6 Mbps, 9 Mbps, 11 Mbps, 12 Mbps, 18 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 36 Mbps, 48 Mbps, and 54 Mbps.

·     802.11n—Rates for 802.11n radios vary by channel bandwidth. For more information, see "MCS."

·     802.11ac—Rates for 802.11ac radios vary by channel bandwidth and number of spatial streams (NSS). For more information, see "VHT-MCS."

MCS

Modulation and Coding Scheme (MCS) defined in IEEE 802.11n-2009 determines the modulation, coding, and number of spatial streams.

MCS types

802.11n MCSs are classified into the following types:

·     Mandatory MCSs—Mandatory MCSs for an AP. To associate with an 802.11n AP, a client must support the mandatory MCSs for the AP.

·     Supported MCSs—MCSs supported by an AP besides the mandatory MCSs. If a client supports both mandatory and supported MCSs, the client can use a supported rate to communicate with the AP.

·     Multicast MCS—MCS for the rate at which an AP transmits multicast frames.

MCS parameters

An MCS is identified by an MCS index, which is represented by an integer in the range of 0 to 76. An MCS index is the mapping from MCS to a data rate.

Table 2 through Table 9 show sample MCS parameters for 20 MHz and 40 MHz.

When the bandwidth mode is 20 MHz, MCS indexes 0 through 15 are mandatory for APs, and MCS indexes 0 through 7 are mandatory for clients.

Table 2 MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=1)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

1

BPSK

6.5

7.2

1

1

QPSK

13.0

14.4

2

1

QPSK

19.5

21.7

3

1

16-QAM

26.0

28.9

4

1

16-QAM

39.0

43.3

5

1

64-QAM

52.0

57.8

6

1

64-QAM

58.5

65.0

7

1

64-QAM

65.0

72.2

 

Table 3 MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=2)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

8

2

BPSK

13.0

14.4

9

2

QPSK

26.0

28.9

10

2

QPSK

39.0

43.3

11

2

16-QAM

52.0

57.8

12

2

16-QAM

78.0

86.7

13

2

64-QAM

104.0

115.6

14

2

64-QAM

117.0

130.0

15

2

64-QAM

130.0

144.4

 

Table 4 MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=3)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

16

3

BPSK

19.5

21.7

17

3

QPSK

39.0

43.3

18

3

QPSK

58.5

65.0

19

3

16-QAM

78.0

86.7

20

3

16-QAM

117.0

130.0

21

3

64-QAM

156.0

173.3

22

3

64-QAM

175.5

195.0

23

3

64-QAM

195.0

216.7

 

Table 5 MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=4)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

24

4

BPSK

26.0

28.9

25

4

QPSK

52.0

57.8

26

4

QPSK

78.0

86.7

27

4

16-QAM

104.0

115.6

28

4

16-QAM

156.0

173.3

29

4

64-QAM

208.0

231.1

30

4

64-QAM

234.0

260.0

31

4

64-QAM

260.0

288.9

 

Table 6 MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=1)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

1

BPSK

13.5

15.0

1

1

QPSK

27.0

30.0

2

1

QPSK

40.5

45.0

3

1

16-QAM

54.0

60.0

4

1

16-QAM

81.0

90.0

5

1

64-QAM

108.0

120.0

6

1

64-QAM

121.5

135.0

7

1

64-QAM

135.0

150.0

 

Table 7 MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=2)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

8

2

BPSK

27.0

30.0

9

2

QPSK

54.0

60.0

10

2

QPSK

81.0

90.0

11

2

16-QAM

108.0

120.0

12

2

16-QAM

162.0

180.0

13

2

64-QAM

216.0

240.0

14

2

64-QAM

243.0

270.0

15

2

64-QAM

270.0

300.0

 

Table 8 MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=3)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

16

3

BPSK

40.5

45.0

17

3

QPSK

81.0

90.0

18

3

QPSK

121.5

135.0

19

3

16-QAM

162.0

180.0

20

3

16-QAM

243.0

270.0

21

3

64-QAM

324.0

360.0

22

3

64-QAM

364.5

405.0

23

3

64-QAM

405.0

450.0

 

Table 9 MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=4)

MCS index

Number of spatial streams

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

24

4

BPSK

54.0

60.0

25

4

QPSK

108.0

120.0

26

4

QPSK

162.0

180.0

27

4

16-QAM

216.0

240.0

28

4

16-QAM

324.0

360.0

29

4

64-QAM

432.0

480.0

30

4

64-QAM

486.0

540.0

31

4

64-QAM

540.0

600.0

 

 

NOTE:

·     For all the MCS data rate tables, see IEEE 802.11n-2009.

·     Support for MCS indexes depends on the device model.

VHT-MCS

Very High Throughput Modulation and Coding Scheme (VHT-MCS) defined in IEEE 802.11ac determines the wireless data rates.

VHT-MCS types

802.11ac VHT-MCSs are classified into the following types:

·     Mandatory VHT-MCSs—Mandatory VHT-MCSs for an AP. To associate with an 802.11ac AP, a client must support the mandatory VHT-MCSs for the AP.

·     Supported VHT-MCSs—VHT-MCSs supported by an AP besides the mandatory VHT-MCSs. If a client supports both mandatory and supported VHT-MCSs, the client can use a supported rate to communicate with the AP.

·     Multicast VHT-MCS—VHT-MCS for the rate at which an AP transmits multicast frames.

VHT-MCS parameters

A VHT-MCS is identified by a VHT-MCS index, which is represented by an integer in the range of 0 to 9. A VHT-MCS index is the mapping from VHT-MCS to a data rate.

802.11ac supports the 20 MHz, 40 MHz, 80 MHz, and 160 MHz bandwidth modes, and supports a maximum of eight spatial streams. 802.11gac supports the 20 MHz and 40 MHz bandwidth modes.

Table 10 through Table 21 show VHT-MCS parameters that are supported by an AP.

Table 10 VHT-MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=1)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

6.5

7.2

1

QPSK

13.0

14.4

2

QPSK

19.5

21.7

3

16-QAM

26.0

28.9

4

16-QAM

39.0

43.3

5

64-QAM

52.0

57.8

6

64-QAM

58.5

65.0

7

64-QAM

65.0

72.2

8

256-QAM

78.0

86.7

9

Not valid

 

Table 11 VHT-MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=2)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

13.0

14.4

1

QPSK

26.0

28.9

2

QPSK

39.0

43.3

3

16-QAM

52.0

57.8

4

16-QAM

78.0

86.7

5

64-QAM

104.0

115.6

6

64-QAM

117.0

130.0

7

64-QAM

130.0

144.4

8

256-QAM

156.0

173.3

9

Not valid

 

Table 12 VHT-MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=3)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

19.5

21.7

1

QPSK

39.0

43.3

2

QPSK

58.5

65.0

3

16-QAM

78.0

86.7

4

16-QAM

117.0

130.0

5

64-QAM

156.0

173.3

6

64-QAM

175.5

195.0

7

64-QAM

195.0

216.7

8

256-QAM

234.0

260.0

9

256-QAM

260.0

288.9

 

Table 13 VHT-MCS parameters (20 MHz, NSS=4)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

26.0

28.9

1

QPSK

52.0

57.8

2

QPSK

78.0

86.7

3

16-QAM

104.0

115.6

4

16-QAM

156.0

173.3

5

64-QAM

208.0

231.1

6

64-QAM

234.0

260.0

7

64-QAM

260.0

288.9

8

256-QAM

312.0

346.7

9

Not valid

 

Table 14 VHT-MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=1)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

13.5

15.0

1

QPSK

27.0

30.0

2

QPSK

40.5

45.0

3

16-QAM

54.0

60.0

4

16-QAM

81.0

90.0

5

64-QAM

108.0

120.0

6

64-QAM

121.5

135.0

7

64-QAM

135.0

150.0

8

256-QAM

162.0

180.0

9

256-QAM

180.0

200.0

 

Table 15 VHT-MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=2)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

27.0

30.0

1

QPSK

54.0

60.0

2

QPSK

81.0

90.0

3

16-QAM

108.0

120.0

4

16-QAM

162.0

180.0

5

64-QAM

216.0

240.0

6

64-QAM

243.0

270.0

7

64-QAM

270.0

300.0

8

256-QAM

324.0

360.0

9

256-QAM

360.0

400.0

 

Table 16 VHT-MCS parameters (40 MHz, NSS=3)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

40.5

45.0

1

QPSK

81.0

90.0

2

QPSK

121.5

135.0

3

16-QAM

162.0

180.0

4

16-QAM

243.0

270.0

5

64-QAM

324.0

360.0

6

64-QAM

364.5

405.0

7

64-QAM

405.0

450.0

8

256-QAM

486.0

540.0

9

256-QAM

540.0

600.0

 

Table 17 VHT-MCS parameters(40 MHz, NSS=4)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

54.0

60.0

1

QPSK

108.0

120.0

2

QPSK

162.0

180.0

3

16-QAM

216.0

240.0

4

16-QAM

324.0

360.0

5

64-QAM

432.0

480.0

6

64-QAM

486.0

540.0

7

64-QAM

540.0

600.0

8

256-QAM

648.0

720.0

9

256-QAM

720.0

800.0

 

Table 18 VHT-MCS parameters (80 MHz, NSS=1)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

29.3

32.5

1

QPSK

58.5

65.0

2

QPSK

87.8

97.5

3

16-QAM

117.0

130.0

4

16-QAM

175.5

195.0

5

64-QAM

234.0

260.0

6

64-QAM

263.0

292.5

7

64-QAM

292.5

325.0

8

256-QAM

351.0

390.0

9

256-QAM

390.0

433.3

 

Table 19 VHT-MCS parameters (80 MHz, NSS=2)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

58.5

65.0

1

QPSK

117.0

130.0

2

QPSK

175.5

195.0

3

16-QAM

234.0

260.0

4

16-QAM

351.0

390.0

5

64-QAM

468.0

520.0

6

64-QAM

526.5

585.0

7

64-QAM

585.0

650.0

8

256-QAM

702.0

780.0

9

256-QAM

780.0

866.7

 

Table 20 VHT-MCS parameters (80 MHz, NSS=3)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

87.8

97.5

1

QPSK

175.5

195.0

2

QPSK

263.3

292.5

3

16-QAM

351.0

390.0

4

16-QAM

526.5

585.0

5

64-QAM

702.0

780.0

6

Not valid

7

64-QAM

877.5

975.0

8

256-QAM

1053.0

1170.0

9

256-QAM

1170.0

1300.0

 

Table 21 VHT-MCS parameters (80 MHz, NSS=4)

VHT-MCS index

Modulation

Data rate (Mbps)

800ns GI

400ns GI

0

BPSK

117.0

130.0

1

QPSK

234.0

260.0

2

QPSK

351.0

390.0

3

16-QAM

468.0

520.0

4

16-QAM

702.0

780.0

5

64-QAM

936.0

1040.0

6

64-QAM

1053.0

1170.0

7

64-QAM

1170.0

1300.0

8

256-QAM

1404.0

1560.0

9

256-QAM

1560.0

1733.3

 

 

NOTE:

·     For all the VHT-MCS data rate tables, see IEEE 802.11ac-2013.

·     Support for VHT-MCS indexes depends on the AP model.

 

Restrictions and guidelines: Radio management configuration

You can configure radios by using the following methods:

·     Configure radios one by one in radio view.

·     Assign APs to an AP group and configure the radios of the AP group in an AP group's radio view.

·     Configure all radios in global configuration view.

For a radio, the settings made in these views for the same parameter take effect in descending order of radio view, an AP group's radio view, and global configuration view.

Radio management tasks at a glance

To configure radio management, perform the following tasks:

·     Enabling or disabling a radio interface

·     Specifying a radio mode

·     Configuring basic radio functions

·     (Optional.) Configuring 802.11n functions

·     (Optional.) Configuring 802.11ac functions

·     (Optional.) Configuring the smart antenna feature

·     (Optional.) Configuring error packet ratio optimization and retransmission ratio optimization

Enabling or disabling a radio interface

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Enable or disable the radio interface.

¡     Enable the radio interface:
undo shutdown

¡     Disable the radio interface:
shutdown

By default, a radio interface is enabled.

Specifying a radio mode

About radio modes

Available radio functions vary by radio mode:

·     For 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g radios, you can configure basic radio functions.

·     For 802.11an and 802.11gn radios, you can configure basic radio functions and 802.11n functions.

·     For 802.11ac and 802.11gac radios, you can configure basic radio functions, 802.11n functions, and 802.11ac functions.

Restrictions and guidelines

Support for channels and transmit powers depends on the radio mode. When you change the mode of a radio, the system automatically adjusts the channel and power parameters for the radio.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Specify a radio mode.

type { dot11a | dot11ac | dot11an | dot11b | dot11g | dot11gac | dot11gn }

The default setting for this command varies by AP model.

Configuring basic radio functions

Specifying a working channel

About specifying a working channel

Perform this task to reduce interference from both wireless and non-wireless devices. You can manually specify a channel or configure the system to automatically select a channel for a radio.

When radar signals are detected on the working channel of a radio, one of the following events occurs:

·     If the channel is automatically assigned, the radio changes its channel.

·     If the channel is manually specified, the radio changes its channel, and switches back to the specified channel after 30 minutes and then starts the quiet timer. If no radar signals are detected within the quiet time, the radio starts to use the channel. If radar signals are detected within the quiet time, the radio changes it channel again.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Specify a working channel.

channel { channel-number | auto }

The default setting for this command varies by device model.

Setting the antenna type

About setting the antenna type

Perform this task to set the antenna type for an AP. The antenna type setting for an AP must be consistent with the type of the antenna used on the AP.

To ensure that the Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP) is within the correct range, the antenna gain automatically changes after you set the antenna type.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the antenna type.

antenna type antenna-type

The default antenna type for an AP varies by device model.

Setting the antenna gain

About setting the antenna gain

EIRP is the actual transmit power of an antenna, and it is the sum of the antenna gain and the maximum transmit power of the radio.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the antenna gain.

custom-antenna gain antenna-gain

By default, the antenna gain is 0 dBi.

Setting the maximum transmit power

Restrictions and guidelines

The transmit power range supported by a radio varies by country code, channel, AP model, radio mode, antenna type, and bandwidth mode. If you change these attributes for a radio after you set the maximum transmit power, the configured maximum transmit power might be out of the supported transmit power range. If this happens, the system automatically adjusts the maximum transmit power to a valid value.

If you enable power lock, the locked power becomes the maximum transmit power. For more information about power lock, see "Configuring power lock."

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the maximum transmit power.

max-power radio-power

By default, a radio interface uses the supported maximum transmit power.

Configuring power lock

About power lock

If you enable power lock, the current power is locked and becomes the maximum transmit power. The locked power still takes effect after the AC restarts.

If you enable power lock, the current power is locked and becomes the maximum transmit power. The locked power still takes effect after the AP restarts.

If a radio enabled with power lock switches to a new channel that provides lower power than the locked power, the maximum power supported by the new channel takes effect.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure power lock.

power-lock { disable | enable }

By default, power lock is disabled.

Setting transmission rates

About transmission rates

Transmission rates are classified into the following types:

·     Prohibited rates—Rates that cannot be used by an AP.

·     Mandatory rates—Rates that the clients must support to associate with an AP.

·     Supported rates—Rates that an AP supports. After a client associates with an AP, the client can select a higher rate from the supported rates to communicate with the AP. The AP automatically decreases or increases the transmission rate as interference signals, retransmission packets, or dropped packets increase or decrease.

·     Multicast rate—Rate at which an AP transmits multicasts and broadcasts. The multicast rate must be selected from the mandatory rates.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the transmission rates for the radio.

rate { multicast { auto | rate-value } | { disabled | mandatory | supported } rate-value }

The default settings are as follows:

¡     802.11a/802.11an/802.11ac radios:

-     Prohibited rates—None.

-     Mandatory rates—6, 12, and 24.

-     Multicast rate—Selected from the mandatory rates.

-     Supported rates—9, 18, 36, 48, and 54.

¡     802.11b radios:

-     Prohibited rates—None.

-     Mandatory rates—1 and 2.

-     Multicast rate—Selected from the mandatory rates.

-     Supported rates—5.5, and 11.

¡     802.11g/802.11gn/802.11gac radios:

-     Prohibited rates—None.

-     Mandatory rates—1, 2, 5.5, and 11.

-     Multicast rate—Selected from the mandatory rates.

-     Supported rates—6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 54.

Setting the beacon interval

About setting the beacon interval

Perform this task to enable an AP to broadcast beacon frames at the specified interval. A short beacon interval enables clients to easily detect the AP but consumes more system resources.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the beacon interval.

beacon-interval interval

By default, the beacon interval is 100 TU.

Setting the DTIM interval

About setting the DTIM interval

An AP periodically broadcasts a beacon compliant with the Delivery Traffic Indication Map (DTIM). After the AP broadcasts the beacon, it sends buffered broadcast and multicast frames based on the value of the DTIM interval. For example, if you set the DTIM interval to 5, the AP sends buffered broadcast and multicast frames every five beacon frames.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the DTIM interval.

dtim counter

By default, the DTIM interval is 1.

Specifying a collision avoidance mode

About collision avoidance modes

Wireless devices operate in half duplex mode and cannot send and receive data simultaneously. To avoid collision, 802.11 allows wireless devices to send Request to Send (RTS) or Clear to Send (CTS) packets before they transmit data.

You can specify either of the following collision avoidance modes for an AP:

·     RTS/CTS—An AP sends an RTS packet to a client before sending data to the client. After receiving the RTS packet, the client sends a CTS packet to the AP. The AP begins to send data after receiving the CTS packet, and other devices that detect the RTS or CTS packet do not send data within a specific time period.

·     CTS-to-self—An AP sends a CTS packet with its own MAC address as the destination MAC address before sending data to a client. After receiving the CTS-to-self packet, the AP begins to send data, and other devices that detect the CTS-to-self packet do not send data within a specific time period. The CTS-to-self mode reduces the transmission time but might result in hidden node problems.

To ensure wireless resource efficiency, collision avoidance takes effect only when the following conditions are met:

·     The size of the packets to be sent is larger than the RTS threshold 2346 bytes.

·     802.11g or 802.11n protection is enabled. For more information about 802.11g or 802.11n protection, see "Configuring 802.11g protection" and "Configuring 802.11n protection."

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Specify a collision avoidance mode.

protection-mode { cts-to-self | rts-cts }

By default, the CTS-to-self mode is used.

Setting the RTS threshold

About setting the RTS threshold

802.11 allows wireless devices to send Request to Send (RTS) or Clear to Send (CTS) packets to avoid collision. However, excessive RTS and CTS packets consume system resources and reduce transmission efficiency. You can set an RTS threshold to resolve this problem. The system performs collision avoidance only for packets larger than the RTS threshold.

Restrictions and guidelines

In a low-density WLAN, increase the RTS threshold to improve the network throughput and efficiency. In a high-density WLAN, decrease the RTS threshold to reduce collisions in the network.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the RTS threshold.

protection-threshold size

By default, the RTS threshold is 2346 bytes.

Setting the fragmentation threshold

About setting the fragmentation threshold

Frames larger than the fragmentation threshold are fragmented before transmission. Frames smaller than the fragmentation threshold are transmitted without fragmentation.

When a fragment is not received, only this fragment rather than the whole frame is retransmitted.

Restrictions and guidelines

In a WLAN with great interference, decrease the fragmentation threshold and set the MTU (ip mtu command) of packets sent over the radio to be lower than the fragmentation threshold. This improves the network throughput and efficiency.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the fragmentation threshold.

fragment-threshold size

By default, the fragmentation threshold is 2346 bytes.

Setting the hardware retransmission limits

About the hardware retransmission limits

In wireless networks, unicast packets require acknowledgements. If a radio fails to receive the acknowledgement for a packet, it retransmits the packet.

You can set hardware retransmission limits for both large frames and small frames. Transmitting large frames requires a large buffer size and a long time because the system performs collision avoidance for large frames before transmission. Therefore, you can set a small hardware retransmission limit for large frames to save system buffer and transmission time.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the hardware retransmission limit for small frames.

short-retry threshold count

By default, the hardware retransmission limit is 7 for small frames.

4.     Set the hardware retransmission limit for large frames.

long-retry threshold count

By default, the hardware retransmission limit is 4 for large frames.

Setting the maximum number of clients that can associate with an AP

About the maximum number of associated clients on an AP

When the maximum number of clients is reached on an AP, the AP stops accepting new clients. This prevents the AP from being overloaded.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the maximum number of clients that can associate with the AP.

client max-count max-number

By default, no limit is set for the number of clients that can associate with an AP.

Configuring access services for 802.11b clients

About 802.11b client access

To prevent low-speed 802.11b clients from decreasing wireless data transmission performance, you can enable an 802.11g, 802.11gac, or 802.11gn radio to disable access services for 802.11b clients.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure access services for 802.11b clients.

client dot11b-forbidden { disable | enable }

By default, the AP accepts 802.11b clients.

Configuring 802.11g protection

About 802.11g protection

When both 802.11b and 802.11g clients exist in a WLAN, transmission collision might occur because they use different modulation modes. 802.11g protection can avoid such collision. It enables 802.11g, 802.11n, or 802.11ac devices to send RTS/CTS or CTS-to-self packets to inform 802.11b clients to defer access to the medium. For more information about RTS/CTS or CTS-to-self, see "Specifying a collision avoidance mode."

802.11g, 802.11n, or 802.11ac devices send RTS/CTS or CTS-to-self packets before sending data only when 802.11b signals are detected on the channel.

802.11g protection automatically takes effect when 802.11b clients associate with an 802.11g, 802.11n (2.4 GHz), or 802.11gac AP.

Restrictions and guidelines

This feature is applicable only to 802.11g, 802.11n (2.4 GHz), and 802.11gac radios.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure 802.11g protection.

dot11g protection { disable | enable }

By default, 802.11g protection is disabled.

Configuring ANI

About ANI

Adaptive Noise Immunity (ANI) enables the device to adjust the anti-noise level as required by the environment to reduce interference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure ANI.

ani { disable | enable }

By default, ANI is enabled.

Setting the preamble type

About preambles

A preamble is a set of bits in a packet header to synchronize transmission signals between sender and receiver. A short preamble improves network performance and a long preamble ensures compatibility with wireless devices using long preambles.

Restrictions and guidelines

This feature is applicable only to 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11gn radios.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the preamble type.

preamble { long | short }

By default, a short preamble is used.

Setting the maximum transmission distance

About the maximum transmission distance

The strength of wireless signals gradually degrades as the transmission distance increases. The maximum transmission distance of wireless signals depends on the surrounding environment and on whether an external antenna is used.

·     Without an external antenna—About 300 meters (984.25 ft).

·     With an external antenna—30 km (18.64 miles) to 50 km (31.07 miles).

·     In an area with obstacles—35 m (114.83 ft) to 50 m (164.04 ft).

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the maximum transmission distance.

distance distance

By default, the maximum transmission distance is 1 km (0.62 miles).

Enabling the continuous mode for a radio

About the continuous mode

This feature is used for network testing only. Do not use it under any other circumstances.

The feature enables continuous data packet sending at the specified rate. When the feature is enabled, do not perform any other operations except for changing the transmit rate.

For an 802.11a, 802.11b, or 802.11g radio, set the transmit rate. For an 802.11n radio, set the transmit rate or MCS index. For an 802.11ac or 802.11gac radio, set the transmit rate, MCS index, or VHT-MCS index.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Enable the continuous mode for the radio interface.

continuous-mode { mcs mcs-index | nss nss-index vht-mcs vhtmcs-index | rate rate-value }

By default, the continuous mode is disabled.

Performing on-demand channel usage measurement

About on-demand channel usage measurement

This feature enables an AP to scan supported channels and display the channel usage after scanning. It takes about one second to scan a channel.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Perform on-demand channel usage measurement.

channel-usage measure

Configuring 802.11n functions

 

NOTE:

·     Support for 802.11n functions depends on the device model.

·     802.11n functions are applicable only to 802.11an, 802.11gn, 802.11ac, and 802.11gac radios.

Configuring the A-MPDU aggregation method

About MPDU aggregation

A MAC Protocol Data Unit (MPDU) is a data frame in 802.11 format. MPDU aggregation aggregates multiple MPDUs into one aggregate MPDU (A-MPDU) to reduce additional information, ACK frames, and Physical Layer Convergence Procedure (PLCP) header overhead. This improves network throughput and channel efficiency.

All MPDUs in an A-MPDU must have the same QoS priority, source address, and destination address.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure the A-MPDU aggregation method.

a-mpdu { disable | enable }

By default, the A-MPDU aggregation method is enabled.

Configuring the A-MSDU aggregation method

About MSDU aggregation

MSDU aggregation aggregates multiple MSDUs into one aggregate MSDU (A-MSDU) to reduce PLCP preamble, PLCP header, and MAC header overheads. This improves network throughput and frame forwarding efficiency.

All MSDUs in an A-MSDU must have the same QoS priority, source address, and destination address. When a device receives an A-MSDU, it restores the A-MSDU to multiple MSDUs for processing.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure the A-MSDU aggregation method.

a-msdu { disable | enable }

By default, the A-MSDU aggregation method is enabled.

Configuring short GI

About short GI

802.11 OFDM fragments frames to data blocks for transmission. It uses GI to ensure that the data block transmissions do not interfere with each other and are immune to transmission delays.

The GI used by 802.11a/g is 800 ns. 802.11n supports a short GI of 400 ns, which provides a 10% increase in data rate.

Both the 20 MHz and 40 MHz bandwidth modes support short GI.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure short GI.

short-gi { disable | enable }

By default, short GI is enabled.

Configuring LDPC

About LDPC

802.11n introduces the Low-Density Parity Check (LDPC) mechanism to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and enhance transmission quality. LDPC takes effect only when both ends support LDPC.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure LDPC.

ldpc { disable | enable }

By default, LDPC is disabled.

Configuring STBC

About STBC

The Space-Time Block Coding (STBC) mechanism enhances the reliability of data transmission and does not require clients to have high transmission rates.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure STBC.

stbc { disable | enable }

By default, STBC is enabled.

Setting MCS indexes

About MCS indexes

802.11n clients use the rate corresponding to the MCS index to send unicast frames. 802.11a/b/g clients use the 802.11a/b/g rate to send unicast frames.

If you do not set a multicast MCS index, 802.11n clients and the AP use the 802.11a/b/g multicast rate to send multicast frames. If you set a multicast MCS index, one of following events occurs:

·     The AP and clients use the rate corresponding to the multicast MCS index to send multicast frames if only 802.11n and 802.11ac clients exist.

·     The AP and clients use the 802.11a/b/g multicast rate to send multicast frames if any 802.11a/b/g clients exist.

When you set the maximum mandatory or supported MCS index, you are specifying a range. For example, if you set the maximum mandatory MCS index to 5, rates corresponding to MCS indexes 0 through 5 are configured as 802.11n mandatory rates.

Restrictions and guidelines

The multicast MCS index cannot be greater than the maximum mandatory MCS index.

The maximum supported MCS index cannot be smaller than the maximum mandatory MCS index.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the maximum mandatory MCS index.

dot11n mandatory maximum-mcs index

By default, no maximum mandatory MCS index is set.

4.     Set the maximum supported MCS index.

dot11n support maximum-mcs index

By default, the maximum supported MCS index is 76.

5.     Set the multicast MCS index.

dot11n multicast-mcs index

By default, no multicast MCS index is set.

Configuring the client dot11n-only feature

About the client dot11n-only feature

To prevent low-speed 802.11a/b/g clients from decreasing wireless data transmission performance, you can enable the client dot11n-only feature for an AP to accept only 802.11n and 802.11ac clients.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure the client dot11n-only feature.

client dot11n-only { disable | enable }

By default, the client dot11n-only feature is disabled.

Setting the 802.11n bandwidth mode

About 802.11n bandwidth modes

802.11n uses the channel structure of 802.11a/b/g, but it increases the number of data subchannels in each 20 MHz channel to 52. This improves data transmission rate.

802.11n binds two adjacent 20 MHz channels to form a 40 MHz channel (one primary channel and one secondary channel). This provides a simple way to double the data rate.

If the current channel of a radio does not support the specified bandwidth mode, the radio clears the channel configuration and selects another channel.

If the bandwidth mode is set to 40 MHz, the radio uses the 40 MHz bandwidth if two adjacent channels that can be bound together exist. If there are no adjacent channels that can be bound together, the radio uses the 20 MHz bandwidth.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the 802.11n bandwidth mode.

channel band-width { 20 | 40 [ auto-switch ] }

By default, the bandwidth mode is 40 MHz for 802.11an radios and 20 MHz for 802.11gn radios.

Only 802.11gn radios support the auto-switch keyword.

Specifying a MIMO mode

 

NOTE:

The number of spatial streams supported by a radio varies by AP model.

About MIMO modes

Multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) enables a radio to send and receive wireless signals through multiple spatial streams. This improves system capacity and spectrum usage without requiring higher bandwidth.

A radio can operate in one of the following MIMO modes:

·     1x1—Sends and receives wireless signals through one spatial stream.

·     2x2—Sends and receives wireless signals through two spatial streams.

·     3x3—Sends and receives wireless signals through three spatial streams.

·     4x4—Sends and receives wireless signals through four spatial streams.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Specify a MIMO mode.

mimo { 1x1 | 2x2 | 3x3 | 4x4 }

The default MIMO mode for a radio varies by device model.

Configuring energy saving

About energy saving

After you enable the energy-saving feature, the MIMO mode of a radio automatically changes to 1x1 if no clients associate with the radio.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure energy saving.

green-energy-management { disable | enable }

By default, energy saving is disabled.

Configuring 802.11n protection

About 802.11n protection

When both 802.11n and non-802.11n clients exist in a WLAN, transmission collision might occur because they use different modulation modes. 802.11n protection can avoid such collision. It enables 802.11n devices to send RTS/CTS or CTS-to-self packets to inform non-802.11n clients to defer access to the medium. For more information about RTS/CTS or CTS-to-self, see "Specifying a collision avoidance mode."

802.11n devices send RTS/CTS or CTS-to-self packets before sending data only when non-802.11n signals are detected on the channel.

802.11n protection automatically takes effect when non-802.11n clients associate with an 802.11n AP.

 

 

NOTE:

802.11n devices refer to 802.11n and 802.11ac devices.

 

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure 802.11n protection.

dot11n protection { disable | enable }

By default, 802.11n protection is disabled.

Configuring 802.11ac functions

 

NOTE:

·     Support for 802.11ac depends on the device model.

·     802.11ac functions are applicable only to 802.11ac and 802.11gac radios.

Setting NSSs

About NSSs

If the AP supports an NSS, it supports all VHT-MCS indexes for the NSS. 802.11ac clients use the rate corresponding to the VHT-MCS index for the NSS to send unicast frames. Non-802.11ac clients use the 802.11a/b/g/n rate to send unicast frames.

If you do not set a multicast NSS, 802.11ac clients and the AP use the 802.11a/b/g/n multicast rate to send multicast frames. If you set a multicast NSS and specify a VHT-MCS index, the following situations occur:

·     The AP and clients use the rate corresponding to the VHT-MCS index to send multicast frames if all clients are 802.11ac clients.

·     The AP and clients use the 802.11a/b/g/n multicast rate to send multicast frames if any non-802.11ac clients exist.

The maximum mandatory NSS or supported NSS determines a range of 802.11 rates. For example, if the maximum mandatory NSS is 5, rates corresponding to VHT-MCS indexes for NSSs 1 through 5 will be 802.11ac mandatory rates.

Restrictions and guidelines

The maximum supported NSS cannot be smaller than the maximum mandatory NSS and the multicast NSS cannot be greater than the maximum mandatory NSS.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the maximum mandatory NSS.

dot11ac mandatory maximum-nss nss-number

By default, no maximum mandatory NSS is set.

4.     Set the maximum supported NSS.

dot11ac support maximum-nss nss-number

By default, the maximum supported NSS is 8.

5.     Set the multicast NSS and specify a VHT-MCS index.

dot11ac multicast-nss nss-number vht-mcs index

By default, no multicast NSS is set.

Configuring the client dot11ac-only feature

About the client dot11ac-only feature

To prevent low-speed 802.11a/b/g/n clients from decreasing wireless data transmission performance, you can enable the client dot11ac-only feature for an AP to accept only 802.11ac clients.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure the client dot11ac-only feature.

client dot11ac-only { disable | enable }

By default, the client dot11ac-only feature is disabled.

Setting the 802.11ac bandwidth mode

About 802.11ac bandwidth modes

802.11ac uses the channel structure of 802.11n and increases the maximum bandwidth from 40 MHz to 160 MHz. 802.11ac can bind two adjacent 20/40/80 MHz channels to form a 40/80/160 MHz channel.

The radio uses the specified 40/80/160 MHz bandwidth if adjacent channels can be bound to form a 40/80/160 channel. If adjacent channels cannot form a 40/80/160 channel, the radio uses the next available bandwidth less than the specified one.

For example, the bandwidth mode is set to 80 MHz. The radio uses the 80 MHz bandwidth if adjacent channels that can be bound together exist. If adjacent channels that can be bound to an 80 MHz channel do not exist, but two adjacent channels that can be bound to a 40 MHz channel exist, the 40 MHz bandwidth is used. If no adjacent channels that can be bound together exist, the radio uses the 20 MHz bandwidth.

When the bandwidth mode is set to 80+80 MHz, the radio uses the 160 MHz bandwidth if two adjacent 80 MHz channels that can be bound together exist. If a 160 MHz channel cannot be formed but two non-adjacent 80 MHz channels are available, the radio uses the two 80 MHz channels to achieve the 160 MHz bandwidth.

If the working channel is specified, you can specify the secondary 80 MHz channel for the 160 MHz or 80+80 MHz bandwidth mode. If no working channel is specified, the device automatically selects a secondary channel. The working channel forwards all packets and the secondary channel forwards only data packets.

If the current channel of a radio does not support the specified bandwidth mode, the radio clears the channel configuration and selects another channel.

 

 

NOTE:

Support for the 160 MHz and 80+80 MHz bandwidth modes depends on the device model.

 

Figure 1 802.11ac bandwidth modes

 

Restrictions and guidelines

802.11gac supports only the 20 MHz and 40 MHz bandwidth modes.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Set the 802.11ac bandwidth mode:

channel band-width { 20 | 40 | 80 }

By default, the bandwidth mode is 80 MHz for 802.11ac radios.

4.     Set the 802.11gac bandwidth mode:

channel band-width { 20 | 40 [ auto-switch ] }

By default, the bandwidth mode is 20 MHz for 802.11gac radios.

Configuring TxBF

 

NOTE:

Support for this feature depends on the AP model.

About TxBF

Transmit beamforming (TxBF) enables an AP to adjust transmitting parameters based on the channel information to focus RF signals on intended clients. This feature improves the RF signal quality. TxBF includes single-user TxBF and multi-user TxBF.

·     Single-user TxBF—Single-user TxBF enables an AP to improve the signal to one intended client. Single-user TxBF is applicable to WLANs that have widely spread clients, poor network quality, and serious signal attenuation.

·     Multi-user TxBF—Multi-user TxBF is part of 802.11ac Wave2. Multi-user TxBF enables an AP to focus different RF signals on their intended clients to reduce interference and transmission delay. This improves traffic throughput and bandwidth usage. Multi-user TxBF is applicable to WLANs that have a large number of clients and require high bandwidth usage and low transmission delay.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure single-user TxBF.

su-txbf { disable | enable }

By default, single-user TxBF is enabled.

4.     Configure multi-user TxBF.

mu-txbf { disable | enable }

By default, multi-user TxBF is enabled.

Multi-user TxBF takes effect only when single-user TxBF is enabled.

Configuring the smart antenna feature

 

NOTE:

Support for this feature depends on the device model.

 

About the smart antenna feature

This feature is applicable only to 802.11n and 802.11ac radios.

The smart antenna feature enables an AP to automatically adjust the antenna parameters based on the client location and channel information to improve signal quality and stability.

You can configure a radio to operate in one of the following smart antenna modes:

·     Auto—Uses the high availability mode for audio and video packets, and uses the high throughput mode for other packets.

·     High-availability—Applicable to WLANs that require stable bandwidth, this mode reduces noise and interference impacts, and provides guaranteed bandwidth for clients.

·     High-throughput—Applicable to WLANs that require high performance, this mode enhances signal strength and association capability.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter radio interface view.

interface wlan-radio interface-number

3.     Configure the smart antenna feature.

Smart-antenna { disable | enable }

By default, the smart antenna feature is enabled.

4.     Specify a smart antenna mode.

smart-antenna policy { auto | high-availability | high-throughput }

By default, the auto mode is used.

Configuring error packet ratio optimization and retransmission ratio optimization

About error packet ratio optimization and retransmission optimization

This feature enables the device to recalculate the error packet ratio and retransmission ratio by using the specified indexes to get smaller ratio values.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the index for optimizing the error packet ratio.

wlan error-frame optimization value

By default, the index for optimizing the error packet ratio is not set.

3.     Set the index for optimizing the retransmission ratio.

wlan retransmit-frame optimization value

By default, the index for optimizing the retransmission ratio is not set.

Display and maintenance commands for radio management

Execute display commands in any view.

 

Task

Command

Display client information.

display wlan client [ interface interface-type interface-number | mac-address mac-address | service-template service-template-name ] [ verbose ]

 

Radio management configuration examples

Example: Configuring basic radio functions

Network configuration

As shown in Figure 2, set the radio mode, working channel, and maximum transmit power to 802.11b, channel 36, and 19 dBm, respectively.

Figure 2 Network diagram

 

Procedure

# Enter radio interface view.

<AP> system-view

[AP] interface wlan-radio 0/0

# Set the radio mode to dot11b.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] type dot11b

# Configure the radio to work on channel 36.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] channel 36

# Set the maximum transmit power to 19 dBm.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] max-power 19

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the online clients are 802.11b clients.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] display wlan client verbose

Total number of clients: 1

 

MAC address                        : 000f-e265-6400

IPv4 address                       : 10.1.1.114

IPv6 address                       : 2001::1234:5678:0102:0304

Username                           : N/A

AID                                : 1

AP ID                              : 1

AP name                            : ap1

Radio ID                           : 1

SSID                               : office

BSSID                              : 0026-3e08-1150

VLAN ID                            : 1

Power save mode                    : Active

Wireless mode                      : 802.11b

Supported rates                    : 1, 2 Mbps

QoS mode                           : WMM

Listen interval                    : 10

RSSI                               : 62

Rx/Tx rate                         : 130/11

Authentication method              : Open system

Security mode                      : PRE-RSNA

AKM mode                           : N/A

Cipher suite                       : N/A

User authentication mode           : Bypass

Authorization ACL ID               : 3001(Not effective)

Authorization user profile         : N/A

Roam status                        : N/A

Key derivation                     : SHA1

PMF status                         : Enabled

Forward policy                     : N/A

Online time                        : 0hr 1min 13sec

FT status                          : Inactive

Example: Configuring 802.11n

Network configuration

As shown in Figure 3, specify the radio as an 802.11an radio, and enable the A-MSDU and A-MPDU aggregation methods on the radio.

Figure 3 Network diagram

 

Procedure

# Enter radio interface view.

<AP> system-view

[AP] interface wlan-radio 0/0

# Set the radio mode to dot11an.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] type dot11an

# Enable the A-MSDU and A-MPDU aggregation methods.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] a-mpdu enable

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] a-msdu enable

# Enable the radio.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] undo shutdown

Verifying the configuration

# Display client information.

[AP-WLAN-Radio0/0] display wlan client verbose

Total number of clients: 1

MAC address                        : 000f-e265-6400

IPv4 address                       : 10.1.1.114

IPv6 address                       : 2001::1234:5678:0102:0304

Username                           : N/A

AID                                : 1

AP ID                              : 1

AP name                            : ap1

Radio ID                           : 1

SSID                               : office

BSSID                              : 0026-3e08-1150

VLAN ID                            : 1

Power save mode                    : Active

Wireless mode                      : 802.11an

Supported rates                    : 1, 2 Mbps

QoS mode                           : WMM

Listen interval                    : 10

RSSI                               : 62

Rx/Tx rate                         : 130/11

Authentication method              : Open system

Security mode                      : PRE-RSNA

AKM mode                           : N/A

Cipher suite                       : N/A

User authentication mode           : Bypass

Authorization ACL ID               : 3001(Not effective)

Authorization user profile         : N/A

Roam status                        : N/A

Key derivation                     : SHA1

PMF status                         : Enabled

Forward policy                     : N/A

Online time                        : 0hr 1min 13sec

FT status                          : Inactive