13-User Access and Authentication Configuration Guide

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04-802.1X configuration
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Contents

802.1X overview·· 1

About the 802.1X protocol 1

802.1X architecture· 1

Controlled/uncontrolled port and port authorization status· 1

Packet exchange methods· 2

Packet formats· 3

802.1X authentication procedures· 5

802.1X authentication initiation· 7

Access control methods· 8

802.1X VLAN manipulation· 8

Authorization VLAN· 8

Guest VLAN· 10

Auth-Fail VLAN· 11

Critical VLAN· 12

ACL assignment 14

User profile assignment 14

Periodic 802.1X reauthentication· 15

EAD assistant 15

SmartOn· 16

Configuring 802.1X·· 17

Restrictions and guidelines: 802.1X configuration· 17

802.1X tasks at a glance· 17

Prerequisites for 802.1X· 17

Enabling 802.1X· 18

Enabling EAP relay or EAP termination· 18

Setting the port authorization state· 19

Specifying an access control method· 19

Specifying a mandatory authentication domain on a port 20

Setting the 802.1X authentication timeout timers· 20

Configuring 802.1X reauthentication· 21

Setting the quiet timer 21

Configuring an 802.1X guest VLAN· 22

Configuring an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN· 22

Configuring an 802.1X critical VLAN· 23

Configuring the authentication trigger feature· 24

Setting the maximum number of concurrent 802.1X users on a port 24

Setting the maximum number of authentication request attempts· 25

Configuring online user handshake· 25

Specifying supported domain name delimiters· 26

Configuring the EAD assistant feature· 27

Configuring 802.1X SmartOn· 27

Display and maintenance commands for 802.1X· 28

Troubleshooting 802.1X· 29

EAD assistant URL redirection failure· 29

 


802.1X overview

About the 802.1X protocol

802.1X is a port-based network access control protocol widely used on Ethernet networks. The protocol controls network access by authenticating the devices connected to 802.1X-enabled LAN ports.

802.1X architecture

802.1X operates in the client/server model. As shown in Figure 1, 802.1X authentication includes the following entities:

·     Client (supplicant)—A user terminal seeking access to the LAN. The terminal must have 802.1X software to authenticate to the access device.

·     Access device (authenticator)—Authenticates the client to control access to the LAN. In a typical 802.1X environment, the access device uses an authentication server to perform authentication.

·     Authentication server—Provides authentication services for the access device. The authentication server first authenticates 802.1X clients by using the data sent from the access device. Then, the server returns the authentication results to the access device to make access decisions. The authentication server is typically a RADIUS server. In a small LAN, you can use the access device as the authentication server.

Figure 1 802.1X architecture

Controlled/uncontrolled port and port authorization status

802.1X defines two logical ports for the network access port: controlled port and uncontrolled port. Any packet arriving at the network access port is visible to both logical ports.

·     Uncontrolled port—Is always open to receive and transmit authentication packets.

·     Controlled port—Filters packets depending on the port state.

¡     Authorized state—The controlled port is in authorized state when the client has passed authentication. The port allows traffic to pass through.

¡     Unauthorized state—The port is in unauthorized state when the client has failed authentication. The port controls traffic by using one of the following methods:

-     Performs bidirectional traffic control to deny traffic to and from the client.

-     Performs unidirectional traffic control to deny traffic from the client. The device supports only unidirectional traffic control.

Figure 2 Authorization state of a controlled port

Packet exchange methods

802.1X uses the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) to transport authentication information for the client, the access device, and the authentication server. EAP is an authentication framework that uses the client/server model. The framework supports a variety of authentication methods, including MD5-Challenge, EAP-Transport Layer Security (EAP-TLS), and Protected EAP (PEAP).

802.1X defines EAP over LAN (EAPOL) for passing EAP packets between the client and the access device over a wired or wireless LAN. Between the access device and the authentication server, 802.1X delivers authentication information by either EAP relay or EAP termination.

EAP relay

EAP relay is defined in IEEE 802.1X. In this mode, the network device uses EAP over RADIUS (EAPOR) packets to send authentication information to the RADIUS server, as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 EAP relay

 

In EAP relay mode, the client must use the same authentication method as the RADIUS server. On the access device, you only need to use the dot1x authentication-method eap command to enable EAP relay.

EAP termination

As shown in Figure 4, the access device performs the following operations in EAP termination mode:

1.     Terminates the EAP packets received from the client.

2.     Encapsulates the client authentication information in standard RADIUS packets.

3.     Uses PAP or CHAP to authenticate to the RADIUS server.

Figure 4 EAP termination

Comparing EAP relay and EAP termination

Packet exchange method

Benefits

Limitations

EAP relay

·     Supports various EAP authentication methods.

·     The configuration and processing are simple on the access device.

The RADIUS server must support the EAP-Message and Message-Authenticator attributes, and the EAP authentication method used by the client.

EAP termination

Works with any RADIUS server that supports PAP or CHAP authentication.

·     Supports only the following EAP authentication methods:

¡     MD5-Challenge EAP authentication.

¡     The username and password EAP authentication initiated by an iNode 802.1X client.

·     The processing is complex on the access device.

 

Packet formats

EAP packet format

Figure 5 shows the EAP packet format.

Figure 5 EAP packet format

 

·     Code—Type of the EAP packet. Options include Request (1), Response (2), Success (3), or Failure (4).

·     Identifier—Used for matching Responses with Requests.

·     Length—Length (in bytes) of the EAP packet. The EAP packet length is the sum of the Code, Identifier, Length, and Data fields.

·     Data—Content of the EAP packet. This field appears only in a Request or Response EAP packet. The Data field contains the request type (or the response type) and the type data. Type 1 (Identity) and type 4 (MD5-Challenge) are two examples for the type field.

EAPOL packet format

Figure 6 shows the EAPOL packet format.

Figure 6 EAPOL packet format

 

·     PAE Ethernet type—Protocol type. It takes the value 0x888E for EAPOL.

·     Protocol version—The EAPOL protocol version used by the EAPOL packet sender.

·     Type—Type of the EAPOL packet. Table 1 lists the types of EAPOL packets supported by the 802.1X implementation of the device.

Table 1 Types of EAPOL packets

Value

Type

Description

0x00

EAP-Packet

The client and the access device uses EAP-Packets to transport authentication information.

0x01

EAPOL-Start

The client sends an EAPOL-Start message to initiate 802.1X authentication to the access device.

0x02

EAPOL-Logoff

The client sends an EAPOL-Logoff message to tell the access device that the client is logging off.

 

·     Length—Data length in bytes, or length of the Packet body. If packet type is EAPOL-Start or EAPOL-Logoff, this field is set to 0, and no Packet body field follows.

·     Packet body—Content of the packet. When the EAPOL packet type is EAP-Packet, the Packet body field contains an EAP packet.

EAP over RADIUS

RADIUS adds two attributes, EAP-Message and Message-Authenticator, for supporting EAP authentication. For more information about the RADIUS packet format, see "Configuring AAA."

·     EAP-Message.

RADIUS encapsulates EAP packets in the EAP-Message attribute, as shown in Figure 7. The Type field takes 79, and the Value field can be up to 253 bytes. If an EAP packet is longer than 253 bytes, RADIUS encapsulates it in multiple EAP-Message attributes.

Figure 7 EAP-Message attribute format

 

·     Message-Authenticator.

As shown in Figure 8, RADIUS includes the Message-Authenticator attribute in all packets that have an EAP-Message attribute to check their integrity. The packet receiver drops the packet if the calculated packet integrity checksum is different from the Message-Authenticator attribute value. The Message-Authenticator prevents EAP authentication packets from being tampered with during EAP authentication.

Figure 8 Message-Authenticator attribute format

802.1X authentication procedures

802.1X authentication has two methods: EAP relay and EAP termination. You choose either mode depending on support of the RADIUS server for EAP packets and EAP authentication methods.

EAP relay

Figure 9 shows the basic 802.1X authentication procedure in EAP relay mode, assuming that MD5-Challenge EAP authentication is used.

Figure 9 802.1X authentication procedure in EAP relay mode

 

The following steps describe the 802.1X authentication procedure:

1.     When a user launches the 802.1X client and enters a registered username and password, the 802.1X client sends an EAPOL-Start packet to the access device.

2.     The access device responds with an EAP-Request/Identity packet to ask for the client username.

3.     In response to the EAP-Request/Identity packet, the client sends the username in an EAP-Response/Identity packet to the access device.

4.     The access device relays the EAP-Response/Identity packet in a RADIUS Access-Request packet to the authentication server.

5.     The authentication server uses the identity information in the RADIUS Access-Request to search its user database. If a matching entry is found, the server uses a randomly generated challenge (EAP-Request/MD5-Challenge) to encrypt the password in the entry. Then, the server sends the challenge in a RADIUS Access-Challenge packet to the access device.

6.     The access device transmits the EAP-Request/MD5-Challenge packet to the client.

7.     The client uses the received challenge to encrypt the password, and sends the encrypted password in an EAP-Response/MD5-Challenge packet to the access device.

8.     The access device relays the EAP-Response/MD5-Challenge packet in a RADIUS Access-Request packet to the authentication server.

9.     The authentication server compares the received encrypted password with the encrypted password it generated at step 5. If the two passwords are identical, the server considers the client valid and sends a RADIUS Access-Accept packet to the access device.

10.     Upon receiving the RADIUS Access-Accept packet, the access device performs the following operations:

a.     Sends an EAP-Success packet to the client.

b.     Sets the controlled port in authorized state.

The client can access the network.

11.     After the client comes online, the access device periodically sends handshake requests to check whether the client is still online. By default, if two consecutive handshake attempts fail, the device logs off the client.

12.     Upon receiving a handshake request, the client returns a response. If the client fails to return a response after a number of consecutive handshake attempts (two by default), the access device logs off the client. This handshake mechanism enables timely release of the network resources used by 802.1X users that have abnormally gone offline.

13.     The client can also send an EAPOL-Logoff packet to ask the access device for a logoff.

14.     In response to the EAPOL-Logoff packet, the access device changes the status of the controlled port from authorized to unauthorized. Then, the access device sends an EAP-Failure packet to the client.

EAP termination

Figure 10 shows the basic 802.1X authentication procedure in EAP termination mode, assuming that CHAP authentication is used.

Figure 10 802.1X authentication procedure in EAP termination mode

 

In EAP termination mode, the access device rather than the authentication server generates an MD5 challenge for password encryption. The access device then sends the MD5 challenge together with the username and encrypted password in a standard RADIUS packet to the RADIUS server.

802.1X authentication initiation

Both the 802.1X client and the access device can initiate 802.1X authentication.

802.1X client as the initiator

The client sends an EAPOL-Start packet to the access device to initiate 802.1X authentication. The destination MAC address of the packet is the IEEE 802.1X specified multicast address 01-80-C2-00-00-03 or the broadcast MAC address. If any intermediate device between the client and the authentication server does not support the multicast address, you must use an 802.1X client that can send broadcast EAPOL-Start packets. For example, you can use the iNode 802.1X client.

Access device as the initiator

If the client cannot send EAPOL-Start packets, configure the access device to initiate authentication. One example is the 802.1X client available with Windows XP.

The access device supports the multicast trigger mode. In this mode, the access device multicasts EAP-Request/Identity packets to initiate 802.1X authentication at the identity request interval.

The username request timeout timer sets the identity request interval for the multicast trigger.

Access control methods

H3C implements port-based access control as defined in the 802.1X protocol, and extends the protocol to support MAC-based access control.

·     Port-based access control—Once an 802.1X user passes authentication on a port, any subsequent user can access the network through the port without authentication. When the authenticated user logs off, all other users are logged off.

·     MAC-based access control—Each user is separately authenticated on a port. When a user logs off, no other online users are affected.

802.1X VLAN manipulation

Authorization VLAN

The authorization VLAN controls the access of an 802.1X user to authorized network resources. The device supports authorization VLANs assigned locally or by a remote server.

 

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

Only remote servers can assign tagged authorization VLANs.

Remote VLAN authorization

In remote VLAN authorization, you must configure an authorization VLAN for a user on the remote server. After the user authenticates to the server, the server assigns authorization VLAN information to the device. Then, the device assigns the user access port to the authorization VLAN as a tagged or untagged member.

The device supports assignment of the following authorization VLAN information by the remote server:

·     VLAN ID.

·     VLAN name, which must be the same as the VLAN description on the access device.

·     A string of VLAN IDs and VLAN names.

In the string, some VLANs are represented by their IDs, and some VLANs are represented by their names.

·     VLAN group name.

For more information about VLAN groups, see VLAN configuration in Network Connectivity Configuration Guide.

·     VLAN ID with a suffix of t or u.

The t and u suffixes require the device to assign the access port to the VLAN as a tagged or untagged member, respectively. For example, 2u indicates assigning the port to VLAN 2 as an untagged member.

If a VLAN name or VLAN group name is assigned, the device converts the information into a VLAN ID before VLAN assignment.

 

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

For a VLAN represented by its VLAN name to be assigned successfully, you must make sure the VLAN has been created on the device.

To assign VLAN IDs with suffixes, make sure the user access port is a hybrid or trunk port that performs port-based access control.

To ensure a successful assignment, the authorization VLANs assigned by the remote server cannot be any of the following types:

·     Dynamically learned VLANs.

·     Reserved VLANs.

If the server assigns a group of VLANs, the access device selects a VLAN as described in Table 2.

Table 2 Authorization VLAN selection from a group of VLANs

VLAN information

Authorization VLAN selection

VLANs by IDs

VLANs by names

VLAN group name

If the 802.1X-enabled port performs MAC-based access control, the device selects an authorization VLAN from the VLAN group for a user according to the following rules:

·     If the port does not have online users, the device selects the VLAN with the lowest ID.

·     If the port has online users, the device examines the VLAN group for the VLAN of the online users. If the VLAN is found, the VLAN is assigned to the user as the authorization VLAN. If the VLAN is not found, VLAN authorization fails.

If the 802.1X-enabled port performs port-based access control, the device selects the VLAN with the lowest ID from the VLAN group. All subsequent 802.1X users are assigned to that VLAN.

VLAN IDs with suffixes

1.     The device selects the leftmost VLAN ID without a suffix, or the leftmost VLAN ID suffixed by u as an untagged VLAN, whichever is more leftmost.

2.     The device assigns the untagged VLAN to the port as the PVID, and it assigns the remaining as tagged VLANs. If no untagged VLAN is assigned, the PVID of the port does not change. The port permits traffic from these tagged and untagged VLANs to pass through.

For example, the authentication server sends the string 1u 2t 3 to the access device for a user. The device assigns VLAN 1 as an untagged VLAN and all remaining VLANs (including VLAN 3) as tagged VLANs. VLAN 1 becomes the PVID.

Local VLAN authorization

To perform local VLAN authorization for a user, specify the VLAN ID in the authorization attribute list of the local user account for that user. For each local user, you can specify only one authorization VLAN ID. The user access port is assigned to the VLAN as an untagged member.

 

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

Local VLAN authorization does not support assignment of tagged VLANs.

For more information about local user configuration, see "Configuring AAA."

Authorization VLAN manipulation on an 802.1X-enabled port

Table 3 describes how the access device handles VLANs (except for the VLANs specified with suffixes) on an 802.1X-enabled port.

Table 3 VLAN manipulation

Port access control method

VLAN manipulation

Port-based

The device assigns the port to the first authenticated user's authorization VLAN. All subsequent 802.1X users can access the VLAN without authentication.

If the authorization VLAN has the untagged attribute, the device assigns the port to the authorization VLAN as an untagged member and sets the VLAN as the PVID.

If the authorization VLAN has the tagged attribute, the device assigns the port to the VLAN as a tagged member without changing the PVID.

NOTE:

The tagged attribute is supported only on trunk and hybrid ports.

MAC-based

·     The device assigns the port to the first authenticated user's authorization VLAN and sets the VLAN as the PVID if that authorization VLAN has the untagged attribute.

·     If the authorization VLAN has the tagged attribute, the device assigns the port to the authorization VLAN without changing its PVID.

 

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

·     If the users are attached to a port whose link type is access, make sure the authorization VLAN assigned by the server has the untagged attribute. VLAN assignment will fail if the server issues a VLAN that has the tagged attribute.

·     When you assign VLANs to users attached to a trunk port or a hybrid port, make sure there is only one untagged VLAN. If a different untagged VLAN is assigned to a subsequent user, the user cannot pass authentication.

·     As a best practice to enhance network security, do not use the port hybrid vlan command to assign a hybrid port to an authorization VLAN as a tagged member.

 

For an 802.1X authenticated user to access the network on a hybrid port when no authorization VLAN is configured for the user, perform one of the following tasks:

·     If the port receives tagged authentication packets from the user in a VLAN, use the port hybrid vlan command to configure the port as a tagged member in the VLAN.

·     If the port receives untagged authentication packets from the user in a VLAN, use the port hybrid vlan command to configure the port as an untagged member in the VLAN.

Guest VLAN

The 802.1X guest VLAN on a port accommodates users that have not performed 802.1X authentication. Users in the guest VLAN can access a limited set of network resources, such as a software server, to download antivirus software and system patches. Once a user in the guest VLAN passes 802.1X authentication, it is removed from the guest VLAN and can access authorized network resources.

The access device handles VLANs on an 802.1X-enabled port based on its 802.1X access control method.

Port-based access control

Authentication status

VLAN manipulation

A user accesses the 802.1X-enabled port when the port is in auto state.

The device assigns the port to the 802.1X guest VLAN. All 802.1X users on this port can access only resources in the guest VLAN.

The guest VLAN assignment varies by port link mode. For more information, see Table 3 in "Authorization VLAN."

A user in the 802.1X guest VLAN fails 802.1X authentication.

If an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN is available, the device assigns the port to the Auth-Fail VLAN. All users on this port can access only resources in the Auth-Fail VLAN.

If no Auth-Fail VLAN is configured, the port is still in the 802.1X guest VLAN. All users on the port are in the guest VLAN.

For information about the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN, see "Auth-Fail VLAN."

A user in the 802.1X guest VLAN passes 802.1X authentication.

The device removes the port from the 802.1X guest VLAN and assigns the port to the authorization VLAN of the user.

If the authentication server does not assign an authorization VLAN, the initial PVID of the port applies. The user and all subsequent 802.1X users are assigned to the initial port VLAN.

After the user logs off, the port is assigned to the guest VLAN again.

NOTE:

The initial PVID of an 802.1X-enabled port refers to the PVID used by the port before the port is assigned to any 802.1X VLANs.

MAC-based access control

Authentication status

VLAN manipulation

A user accesses the 802.1X-enabled port and has not performed 802.1X authentication.

The device creates a mapping between the MAC address of the user and the 802.1X guest VLAN. The user can access only resources in the guest VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X guest VLAN fails 802.1X authentication.

If an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN is available, the device remaps the MAC address of the user to the Auth-Fail VLAN. The user can access only resources in the Auth-Fail VLAN.

If no 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN is configured, the user is removed from the 802.1X guest VLAN and added to the initial PVID.

A user in the 802.1X guest VLAN passes 802.1X authentication.

The device remaps the MAC address of the user to the authorization VLAN.

If the authentication server does not assign an authorization VLAN, the device remaps the MAC address of the user to the initial PVID on the port.

Auth-Fail VLAN

The 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN on a port accommodates users that have failed 802.1X authentication because of the failure to comply with the organization security strategy. For example, the VLAN accommodates users that have entered a wrong password. Users in the Auth-Fail VLAN can access a limited set of network resources, such as a software server, to download antivirus software and system patches.

The access device handles VLANs on an 802.1X-enabled port based on its 802.1X access control method.

Port-based access control

Authentication status

VLAN manipulation

A user accesses the port and fails 802.1X authentication.

The device assigns the port to the Auth-Fail VLAN. All 802.1X users on this port can access only resources in the Auth-Fail VLAN.

The Auth-Fail VLAN assignment varies by port link mode. For more information, see Table 3 in "Authorization VLAN."

A user in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN fails 802.1X authentication.

The port is still in the Auth-Fail VLAN, and all 802.1X users on this port are in this VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN passes 802.1X authentication.

The device assigns the port to the authorization VLAN of the user, and it removes the port from the Auth-Fail VLAN.

If the authentication server does not assign an authorization VLAN, the initial PVID of the port applies. The user and all subsequent 802.1X users are assigned to the initial PVID.

After the user logs off, the port is assigned to the guest VLAN. If no guest VLAN is configured, the port is assigned to the initial PVID of the port.

MAC-based access control

Authentication status

VLAN manipulation

A user accesses the port and fails 802.1X authentication.

The device maps the MAC address of the user to the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN. The user can access only resources in the Auth-Fail VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN fails 802.1X authentication.

The user is still in the Auth-Fail VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN passes 802.1X authentication.

The device remaps the MAC address of the user to the authorization VLAN.

If the authentication server does not assign an authorization VLAN, the device remaps the MAC address of the user to the initial PVID on the port.

Critical VLAN

The 802.1X critical VLAN on a port accommodates 802.1X users that have failed authentication because none of the RADIUS servers in their ISP domain are reachable. Users in the critical VLAN can access a limited set of network resources depending on the configuration.

The critical VLAN feature takes effect when 802.1X authentication is performed only through RADIUS servers. If an 802.1X user fails local authentication after RADIUS authentication, the user is not assigned to the critical VLAN. For more information about the authentication methods, see "Configuring AAA."

The access device handles VLANs on an 802.1X-enabled port based on its 802.1X access control method.

Port-based access control

Authentication status

VLAN manipulation

A user accesses the port and fails 802.1X authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The device assigns the port to the critical VLAN. The 802.1X user and all subsequent 802.1X users on this port can access only resources in the 802.1X critical VLAN.

The critical VLAN assignment varies by port link mode. For more information, see Table 3 in "Authorization VLAN."

A user in the 802.1X critical VLAN fails authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The port is still in the critical VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X critical VLAN fails authentication for any reason other than unreachable servers.

If an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN has been configured, the port is assigned to the Auth-Fail VLAN. If no 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN is configured, the port is assigned to the initial PVID of the port.

A user in the 802.1X critical VLAN passes 802.1X authentication.

The device assigns the port to the authorization VLAN of the user, and it removes the port from the 802.1X critical VLAN.

If the authentication server does not assign an authorization VLAN, the initial PVID of the port applies. The user and all subsequent 802.1X users are assigned to this port VLAN.

After the user logs off, the port is assigned to the guest VLAN. If no 802.1X guest VLAN is configured, the initial PVID of the port is restored.

A user in the 802.1X guest VLAN fails authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The device assigns the port to the 802.1X critical VLAN, and all 802.1X users on this port are in this VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN fails authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The port is still in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN. All 802.1X users on this port can access only resources in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN.

A user that has passed authentication fails reauthentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable, and the user is logged out of the device.

The device assigns the port to the 802.1X critical VLAN.

If the port is added to the critical VLAN because no RADIUS servers are reachable, the device performs the following operations after it detects a reachable RADIUS server:

1.     Removes the port from the critical VLAN.

2.     Sends a multicast EAP-Request/Identity message out of the port to trigger authentication.

MAC-based access control

Authentication status

VLAN manipulation

A user accesses the port and fails 802.1X authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The device maps the MAC address of the user to the 802.1X critical VLAN. The user can access only resources in the 802.1X critical VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X critical VLAN fails authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The user is still in the critical VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X critical VLAN fails 802.1X authentication for any reason other than unreachable servers.

If an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN has been configured, the device remaps the MAC address of the user to the Auth-Fail VLAN ID.

If no 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN has been configured, the device remaps the MAC address of the user to the initial PVID.

A user in the 802.1X critical VLAN passes 802.1X authentication.

The device remaps the MAC address of the user to the authorization VLAN.

If the authentication server does not assign an authorization VLAN to the user, the device remaps the MAC address of the user to the initial PVID on the port.

A user in the 802.1X guest VLAN fails authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The device remaps the MAC address of the user to the 802.1X critical VLAN. The user can access only resources in the 802.1X critical VLAN.

A user in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN fails authentication because all the RADIUS servers are unreachable.

The user remains in the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN.

If a user is added to the critical VLAN because no RADIUS servers are reachable, the device performs the following operations after it detects a reachable RADIUS server:

1.     Removes the user from the critical VLAN.

2.     Sends a unicast EAP-Request/Identity message out of the port to the user for reauthentication.

ACL assignment

You can specify an ACL for an 802.1X user on the authentication server to control the user's access to network resources. After the user passes 802.1X authentication, the authentication server assigns the ACL to the user access port of the user. Then, the port permits or drops the matching traffic for the user depending on the rules configured in the ACL.

The authentication server can be the local access device or a RADIUS server. In either case, the server only specifies the ACL number. You must create the ACL and configure its rules on the access device.

To change the access control criteria for the user, you can use one of the following methods:

·     Modify ACL rules on the access device.

·     Specify another authorization ACL on the authentication server.

The supported authorization ACLs include the following types:

·     Basic ACLs, which are numbered in the range of 2000 to 2999.

·     Advanced ACLs, which are numbered in the range of 3000 to 3999.

·     Layer 2 ACLs, which are numbered in the range of 4000 to 4999.

For an authorization ACL to take effect, make sure the ACL exists with rules and none of the rules contains the counting, established, fragment, source-mac, or logging keyword.

For more information about ACLs, see Security Command Reference.

User profile assignment

You can specify a user profile for an 802.1X user on the authentication server to control the user's access to network resources. After the user passes 802.1X authentication, the authentication server assigns the user profile to the user for filtering traffic.

The authentication server can be the local access device or a RADIUS server. In either case, the server only specifies the user profile name. You must configure the user profile on the access device.

To change the user's access permissions, you can use one of the following methods:

·     Modify the user profile configuration on the access device.

·     Specify another user profile for the user on the authentication server.

Periodic 802.1X reauthentication

Periodic 802.1X reauthentication tracks the connection status of online users and updates the authorization attributes (such as ACL and VLAN) assigned by the server.

The device reauthenticates online 802.1X users at the periodic reauthentication interval when the periodic online user reauthentication feature is enabled. The interval is controlled by a timer and the timer is user configurable. A change to the periodic reauthentication timer applies to online users only after the old timer expires and the users pass authentication.

The server-assigned session timeout timer (Session-Timeout attribute) and termination action (Termination-Action attribute) together can affect the periodic online user reauthentication feature. To display the server-assigned Session-Timeout and Termination-Action attributes, use the display dot1x connection command.

·     If the termination action is Default (logoff), periodic online user reauthentication on the device takes effect only when the periodic reauthentication timer is shorter than the session timeout timer.

·     If the termination action is Radius-request, the periodic online user reauthentication settings on the device do not take effect. The device reauthenticates the online 802.1X users after the session timeout timer expires.

If no session timeout timer is assigned by the server, whether the device performs periodic 802.1X reauthentication depends on the periodic reauthentication configuration on the device. Support for the assignment of Session-Timeout and Termination-Action attributes depends on the server model.

By default, the device logs off online 802.1X users if no server is reachable for 802.1X reauthentication. The keep-online feature keeps authenticated 802.1X users online when no server is reachable for 802.1X reauthentication.

The VLANs assigned to an online user before and after reauthentication can be the same or different.

EAD assistant

Endpoint Admission Defense (EAD) is an H3C integrated endpoint access control solution to improve the threat defensive capability of a network. The solution enables the security client, security policy server, access device, and third-party server to operate together. If a terminal device seeks to access an EAD network, it must have an EAD client, which performs 802.1X authentication.

The EAD assistant feature enables the access device to redirect the HTTP requests of a user to a redirect URL for downloading and installing an EAD client. This feature eliminates the administrative task to deploy EAD clients.

EAD assistant is implemented by the following functionality:

·     Free IP.

A free IP is a freely accessible network segment, which has a limited set of network resources such as software and DHCP servers. To ensure security strategy compliance, an unauthenticated user can access only this segment to perform operations. For example, the user can download EAD client from a software server or obtain a dynamic IP address from a DHCP server.

·     Redirect URL.

If an unauthenticated 802.1X user is using a Web browser to access the network, EAD assistant redirects the network access requests of the user to a specific URL. For example, you can use this feature to redirect the user to the EAD client software download page.

The EAD assistant feature creates an ACL-based EAD rule automatically to open access to the redirect URL for each redirected user.

EAD rules are implemented by using ACL resources. When the EAD rule timer expires or the user passes authentication, the rule is removed. If users fail to download EAD client or fail to pass authentication before the timer expires, they must reconnect to the network to access the free IP.

SmartOn

The SmartOn feature was developed to support the NEC 802.1X client.

As shown in Figure 11, the access device performs SmartOn authentication before 802.1X authentication. The following shows the authentication process:

1.     When a SmartOn-enabled port receives an EAPOL-Start packet from an 802.1X client, it sends a unicast EAP-Request/Notification packet to the client for SmartOn authentication.

2.     Upon receiving an EAP-Response/Notification from the client, the device compares the switch ID and password in the packet with the switch ID and password configured on the device.

¡     If they are the same, 802.1X authentication can continue.

¡     If they do not match, SmartOn authentication fails. The access device stops 802.1X authentication for the client.

Figure 11 802.1X authentication process with the SmartOn feature

 

If the user attempts to use another 802.1X client for authentication, it will fail SmartOn authentication. The access device stops 802.1X authentication for the user.

 

 

NOTE:

After you install the SmartOn client software, add two values QX_ID and QX_PASSWORD to the Windows registry key [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Soliton Systems K.K.\SmartOn Client\Clients\1XGate]. Specify the switch ID and password for the QX_ID and QX_PASSWORD, respectively. The switch ID and password must be the same as the switch ID and password configured on the device.


Configuring 802.1X

Restrictions and guidelines: 802.1X configuration

You can configure the port security feature to perform 802.1X. Port security combines and extends 802.1X and MAC authentication. It applies to a network (a WLAN, for example) that requires different authentication methods for different users on a port. For more information about the port security feature, see "Configuring port security."

Do not change the link type of a port when the 802.1X guest VLAN, Auth-Fail VLAN, or critical VLAN on the port has users.

802.1X tasks at a glance

To configure 802.1X authentication, perform the following tasks:

1.     Enabling 802.1X

2.     Configuring basic 802.1X features

¡     Enabling EAP relay or EAP termination

¡     Setting the port authorization state

¡     Specifying an access control method

¡     (Optional.) Specifying a mandatory authentication domain on a port

¡     (Optional.) Setting the 802.1X authentication timeout timers

¡     (Optional.) Configuring 802.1X reauthentication

¡     (Optional.) Setting the quiet timer

3.     (Optional.) Configuring 802.1X VLAN assignment

¡     Configuring an 802.1X guest VLAN

¡     Configuring an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN

¡     Configuring an 802.1X critical VLAN

4.     (Optional.) Configuring other 802.1X features

¡     Configuring the authentication trigger feature

Perform this task when 802.1X clients cannot initiate authentication.

¡     Setting the maximum number of concurrent 802.1X users on a port

¡     Setting the maximum number of authentication request attempts

¡     Configuring online user handshake

¡     Specifying supported domain name delimiters

¡     Configuring the EAD assistant feature

¡     Configuring 802.1X SmartOn

Prerequisites for 802.1X

Before you configure 802.1X, complete the following tasks:

·     Configure an ISP domain and AAA scheme (local or RADIUS authentication) for 802.1X users.

·     If RADIUS authentication is used, create user accounts on the RADIUS server.

·     If local authentication is used, create local user accounts on the access device and set the service type to lan-access.

Enabling 802.1X

Restrictions and guidelines

For 802.1X to take effect on a port, you must enable it both globally and on the port.

Do not enable 802.1X on a port that is in a link aggregation group.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable 802.1X globally.

dot1x

By default, 802.1X is disabled globally.

3.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

4.     Enable 802.1X on a port.

dot1x

By default, 802.1X is disabled on a port.

Enabling EAP relay or EAP termination

About this task

Consider the following factors to select a proper EAP mode:

·     Support of the RADIUS server for EAP packets.

·     Authentication methods supported by the 802.1X client and the RADIUS server.

Restrictions and guidelines

·     If EAP relay mode is used, the user-name-format command configured in RADIUS scheme view does not take effect. The access device sends the authentication data from the client to the server without any modification. For more information about the user-name-format command, see AAA commands in User Access and Authentication Command Reference.

·     You can use both EAP termination and EAP relay in any of the following situations:

¡     The client is using only MD5-Challenge EAP authentication. If EAP termination is used, you must enable CHAP authentication on the access device.

¡     The client is an iNode 802.1X client and initiates only the username and password EAP authentication. If EAP termination is used, you can enable either PAP or CHAP authentication on the access device. However, for the purpose of security, you must use CHAP authentication on the access device.

·     To use EAP-TLS, PEAP, or any other EAP authentication methods, you must use EAP relay. When you make your decision, see "Comparing EAP relay and EAP termination" for help.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure EAP relay or EAP termination.

dot1x authentication-method { chap | eap | pap }

By default, the access device performs EAP termination and uses CHAP to communicate with the RADIUS server.

Setting the port authorization state

About this task

The port authorization state determines whether the client is granted access to the network. You can control the following authorization states of a port:

·     Authorized—Places the port in the authorized state, enabling users on the port to access the network without authentication.

·     Unauthorized—Places the port in the unauthorized state, denying any access requests from users on the port.

·     Auto—Places the port initially in unauthorized state to allow only EAPOL packets to pass. After a user passes authentication, sets the port in the authorized state to allow access to the network. You can use this option in most scenarios.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Set the port authorization state.

dot1x port-control { authorized-force | auto | unauthorized-force }

By default, the auto state applies.

Specifying an access control method

About this task

The device supports port-based and MAC-based access control methods.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Specify an access control method.

dot1x port-method { macbased | portbased }

By default, MAC-based access control applies.

Specifying a mandatory authentication domain on a port

About this task

You can place all 802.1X users in a mandatory authentication domain for authentication, authorization, and accounting on a port. No user can use an account in any other domain to access the network through the port. The implementation of a mandatory authentication domain enhances the flexibility of 802.1X access control deployment.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Specify a mandatory 802.1X authentication domain on the port.

dot1x mandatory-domain domain-name

By default, no mandatory 802.1X authentication domain is specified.

Setting the 802.1X authentication timeout timers

About this task

The network device uses the following 802.1X authentication timeout timers:

·     Client timeout timer—Starts when the access device sends an EAP-Request/MD5-Challenge packet to a client. If no response is received when this timer expires, the access device retransmits the request to the client.

·     Server timeout timer—Starts when the access device sends a RADIUS Access-Request packet to the authentication server. If no response is received when this timer expires, 802.1X authentication fails.

Restrictions and guidelines

In most cases, the default settings are sufficient. You can edit the timers, depending on the network conditions.

·     In a low-speed network, increase the client timeout timer.

·     In a network with authentication servers of different performance, adjust the server timeout timer.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the client timeout timer.

dot1x timer supp-timeout supp-timeout-value

The default is 30 seconds.

3.     Set the server timeout timer.

dot1x timer server-timeout server-timeout-value

The default is 100 seconds.

Configuring 802.1X reauthentication

Restrictions and guidelines

Any modification to the mandatory authentication domain or EAP message handling method setting does not affect the reauthentication of online 802.1X users. The modified setting takes effect only on 802.1X users that come online after the modification.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     (Optional.) Set the periodic reauthentication timer.

dot1x timer reauth-period reauth-period-value

The default setting is 3600 seconds.

3.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

4.     Enable periodic online user reauthentication.

dot1x re-authenticate

By default, the feature is disabled.

5.     (Optional.) Enable the keep-online feature for 802.1X users.

dot1x re-authenticate server-unreachable keep-online

By default, this feature is disabled. The device logs off online 802.1X users if no authentication server is reachable for 802.1X reauthentication.

Use the keep-online feature according to the actual network condition. In a fast-recovery network, you can use the keep-online feature to prevent 802.1X users from coming online and going offline frequently.

Setting the quiet timer

About this task

The quiet timer enables the access device to wait a period of time before it can process any authentication request from a client that has failed an 802.1X authentication.

Restrictions and guidelines

You can edit the quiet timer, depending on the network conditions.

·     In a vulnerable network, set the quiet timer to a high value.

·     In a high-performance network with quick authentication response, set the quiet timer to a low value.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable the quiet timer.

dot1x quiet-period

By default, the timer is disabled.

3.     (Optional.) Set the quiet timer.

dot1x timer quiet-period quiet-period-value

The default is 60 seconds.

Configuring an 802.1X guest VLAN

Restrictions and guidelines

·     You can configure only one 802.1X guest VLAN on a port. The 802.1X guest VLANs on different ports can be different.

·     Assign different IDs to the port VLAN and the 802.1X guest VLAN on a port. The assignment makes sure the port can correctly process incoming VLAN-tagged traffic.

·     On a hybrid port, the guest VLAN can only be an untagged VLAN.

·     When you configure multiple security features on a port, follow the guidelines in Table 4.

Table 4 Relationships of the 802.1X guest VLAN and other security features

Feature

Relationship description

Reference

802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN on a port that performs MAC-based access control

The 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN has a higher priority than the 802.1X guest VLAN.

See "802.1X VLAN manipulation."

Port intrusion protection actions on a port that performs MAC-based access control

The 802.1X guest VLAN feature has higher priority than the block MAC action.

The 802.1X guest VLAN feature has lower priority than the shutdown port action of the port intrusion protection feature.

See "Configuring port security."

Prerequisites

Before you configure an 802.1X guest VLAN, complete the following tasks:

·     Create the VLAN to be specified as the 802.1X guest VLAN.

·     If the port type is hybrid, verify that the VLAN to be specified as the guest VLAN is not in the tagged VLAN list on the port.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Configure the 802.1X guest VLAN on the port.

dot1x guest-vlan guest-vlan-id

By default, no 802.1X guest VLAN exists on a port.

Configuring an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN

Restrictions and guidelines

·     Assign different IDs to the port VLAN and the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN on a port. The assignment makes sure the port can correctly process VLAN-tagged incoming traffic.

·     You can configure only one 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN on a port. The 802.1X Auth-Fail VLANs on different ports can be different.

·     On a hybrid port, the Auth-Fail VLAN can only be an untagged VLAN.

·     When you configure multiple security features on a port, follow the guidelines in Table 5.

Table 5 Relationships of the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN with other features

Feature

Relationship description

Reference

MAC authentication guest VLAN on a port that performs MAC-based access control

The 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN has a high priority.

See "Configuring MAC authentication."

Port intrusion protection actions on a port that performs MAC-based access control

The 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN feature has higher priority than the block MAC action.

The 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN feature has lower priority than the shutdown port action of the port intrusion protection feature.

See "Configuring port security."

Prerequisites

Before you configure an 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN, complete the following tasks:

·     Create the VLAN to be specified as the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN.

·     If the port type is hybrid, verify that the VLAN to be specified as the Auth-Fail VLAN is not in the tagged VLAN list on the port.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Configure the 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN on the port.

dot1x auth-fail vlan authfail-vlan-id

By default, no 802.1X Auth-Fail VLAN exists on a port.

Configuring an 802.1X critical VLAN

Restrictions and guidelines for 802.1X critical VLAN configuration

·     Assign different IDs to the PVID and the 802.1X critical VLAN on a port. The assignment makes sure the port can correctly process VLAN-tagged incoming traffic.

·     You can configure only one 802.1X critical VLAN on a port. The 802.1X critical VLANs on different ports can be different.

·     On a hybrid port, the critical VLAN can only be an untagged VLAN.

Prerequisites

Before you configure an 802.1X critical VLAN, complete the following tasks:

·     Create the VLAN to be specified as a critical VLAN.

·     If the port type is hybrid, verify that the VLAN to be specified as the critical VLAN is not in the tagged VLAN list on the port.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Configure the 802.1X critical VLAN on the port.

dot1x critical vlan critical-vlan-id

By default, no 802.1X critical VLAN exists on a port.

Configuring the authentication trigger feature

About this task

The device provides a multicast trigger on the device to initiate 802.1X authentication when 802.1X clients cannot initiate authentication. For more information about 802.1X authentication initiation, see "802.1X overview".

Restrictions and guidelines

·     Enable the multicast trigger on a port when the clients attached to the port cannot send EAPOL-Start packets to initiate 802.1X authentication.

·     Disable the multicast trigger in a wireless LAN. Wireless clients and the wireless module of the access device can both initiate 802.1X authentication.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     (Optional.) Set the username request timeout timer.

dot1x timer tx-period tx-period-value

The default is 30 seconds.

3.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

4.     Enable the authentication trigger.

dot1x multicast-trigger

By default, the multicast trigger is enabled.

Setting the maximum number of concurrent 802.1X users on a port

About this task

Perform this task to prevent the system resources from being overused.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Set the maximum number of concurrent 802.1X users on a port.

dot1x max-user max-number

The default is 4294967295.

Setting the maximum number of authentication request attempts

About this task

The access device retransmits an authentication request if it does not receive any responses to the request from the client within a period of time. To set the time, use the dot1x timer tx-period tx-period-value command or the dot1x timer supp-timeout supp-timeout-value command. The access device stops retransmitting the request if it has made the maximum number of request transmission attempts but still receives no response.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the maximum number of attempts for sending an authentication request.

dot1x retry retries

The default setting is 2.

Configuring online user handshake

About this task

The online user handshake feature checks the connectivity status of online 802.1X users. The access device sends handshake requests (EAP-Request/Identity) to online users at the interval specified by the dot1x timer handshake-period command. If the device does not receive any EAP-Response/Identity packets from an online user after it has made the maximum handshake attempts, the device sets the user to offline state. To set the maximum handshake attempts, use the dot1x retry command.

Typically, the device does not reply to 802.1X clients' EAP-Response/Identity packets with EAP-Success packets. Some 802.1X clients will go offline if they do not receive the EAP-Success packets for handshake. To avoid this issue, enable the online user handshake reply feature.

If iNode clients are deployed, you can also enable the online user handshake security feature to check authentication information in the handshake packets from clients. This feature can prevent 802.1X users that use illegal client software from bypassing iNode security check, such as dual network interface cards (NICs) detection. If a user fails the handshake security checking, the device sets the user to the offline state.

Restrictions and guidelines

·     If the network has 802.1X clients that cannot exchange handshake packets with the access device, disable the online user handshake feature. This operation prevents the 802.1X connections from being incorrectly torn down.

·     The SmartOn feature and the online user handshake feature are mutually exclusive. Before you enable the online user handshake feature, make sure the SmartOn feature is disabled.

·     To use the online user handshake security feature, make sure the online user handshake feature is enabled.

·     The online user handshake security feature takes effect only on the network where the iNode client and IMC server are used.

·     Enable the online user handshake reply feature only if 802.1X clients will go offline without receiving EAP-Success packets from the device.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     (Optional.) Set the handshake timer.

dot1x timer handshake-period handshake-period-value

The default is 15 seconds.

3.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

4.     Enable the online user handshake feature.

dot1x handshake

By default, the feature is enabled.

5.     (Optional.) Enable the online user handshake security feature.

dot1x handshake secure

By default, the feature is disabled.

6.     (Optional.) Enable the 802.1X online user handshake reply feature.

dot1x handshake reply enable

By default, the device does not reply to 802.1X clients' EAP-Response/Identity packets during the online handshake process.

Specifying supported domain name delimiters

About this task

By default, the access device supports the at sign (@) as the delimiter. You can also configure the access device to accommodate 802.1X users that use other domain name delimiters. The configurable delimiters include the at sign (@), backslash (\), dot (.), and forward slash (/). Usernames that include domain names can use the format of username@domain-name, domain-name\username, username.domain-name, or username/domain-name.

If an 802.1X username string contains multiple configured delimiters, the rightmost delimiter is the domain name delimiter. For example, if you configure the backslash (\), dot (.), and forward slash (/) as delimiters, the domain name delimiter for the username string 121.123/22\@abc is the backslash (\). The username is @abc and the domain name is 121.123/22.

Restrictions and guidelines

If a username string contains none of the delimiters, the access device authenticates the user in the mandatory or default ISP domain.

If you configure the access device to send usernames with domain names to the RADIUS server, make sure the domain delimiter can be recognized by the RADIUS server. For username format configuration, see the user-name-format command in User Access and Authentication Command Reference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Specify a set of domain name delimiters for 802.1X users.

dot1x domain-delimiter string

By default, only the at sign (@) delimiter is supported.

Configuring the EAD assistant feature

Restrictions and guidelines

·     You must disable MAC authentication and port security globally before you enable the EAD assistant feature.

·     To make the EAD assistant feature take effect on an 802.1X-enabled port, you must set the port authorization mode to auto.

·     When global MAC authentication or port security is enabled, the free IP does not take effect.

·     For the 802.1X guest VLAN feature to work correctly, do not enable EAD assistant together with the 802.1X guest VLAN feature.

·     If you use free IP and Auth-Fail VLAN features together, make sure the resources in the Auth-Fail VLAN are on the free IP segments.

·     To allow a user to obtain a dynamic IP address before it passes 802.1X authentication, make sure the DHCP server is on the free IP segment.

·     The server that provides the redirect URL must be on the free IP accessible to unauthenticated users.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable the EAD assistant feature.

dot1x ead-assistant enable

By default, this feature is disabled.

3.     Configure a free IP.

dot1x ead-assistant free-ip ip-address { mask-length | mask-address }

By default, no free IPs exist.

Repeat this command to configure multiple free IPs.

4.     (Optional.) Configure the redirect URL if users will use Web browsers to access the network.

dot1x ead-assistant url url-string

By default, no redirect URL exists.

5.     (Optional.) Set the EAD rule timer.

dot1x timer ead-timeout ead-timeout-value

The default setting is 30 minutes.

To avoid using up ACL resources when a large number of EAD users exist, you can shorten the EAD rule timer.

Configuring 802.1X SmartOn

About this task

When the device sends a unicast EAP-Request/Notification packet to the client, it starts the SmartOn client timeout timer (set by using the dot1x smarton timer supp-timeout command).

·     If the device does not receive any EAP-Response/Notification packets from the client within the timeout timer, it retransmits the EAP-Request/Notification packet to the client. After the device has made the maximum retransmission attempts but received no response, it stops the 802.1X authentication process for the client.

·     If the device receives an EAP-Response/Notification packet within the timer or before the maximum retransmission attempts have been made, it starts the SmartOn authentication. If the SmartOn switch ID and the MD5 digest of the SmartOn password in the packet match those on the device, 802.1X authentication continues for the client. Otherwise, the device denies the client's 802.1X authentication request.

Restrictions and guidelines

The SmartOn feature is mutually exclusive with the 802.1X online user handshake feature.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Enable the SmartOn feature on the port.

dot1x smarton

By default, this feature is disabled.

4.     Return to system view.

quit

5.     Configure the SmartOn switch ID.

dot1x smarton switchid switch-string

By default, no SmartOn switch ID exists.

6.     Set the SmartOn password.

dot1x smarton password { cipher | simple } string

By default, no SmartOn password exists.

7.     (Optional.) Set the SmartOn client timeout timer.

dot1x smarton timer supp-timeout supp-timeout-value

The default timer is 30 seconds.

8.     (Optional.) Set the maximum attempts for retransmitting an EAP-Request/Notification packet to a client.

dot1x smarton retry retries

By default, the device allows a maximum of 3 attempts for retransmitting an EAP-Request/Notification packet to a client.

Display and maintenance commands for 802.1X

Execute display commands in any view and reset commands in user view.

 

Task

Command

Display 802.1X session information, statistics, or configuration information of specified or all ports.

display dot1x [ sessions | statistics ] [ ap ap-name [ radio radio-id ] | interface interface-type interface-number ]

Display online 802.1X user information.

display dot1x connection [ ap ap-name [ radio radio-id ] | interface interface-type interface-number | user-mac mac-address | user-name name-string ]

Remove users from the 802.1X guest VLAN on a port.

reset dot1x guest-vlan interface interface-type interface-number [ mac-address mac-address ]

Clear 802.1X statistics.

reset dot1x statistics [ ap ap-name [ radio radio-id ] | interface interface-type interface-number ]

Troubleshooting 802.1X

EAD assistant URL redirection failure

Symptom

Unauthenticated users are not redirected to the specified redirect URL after they enter external website addresses in their Web browsers.

Analysis

Redirection will not happen for one of the following reasons:

·     The address is in the string format. The operating system of the host regards the string as a website name and tries to resolve the string. If the resolution fails, the operating system sends an ARP request, but the target address is not in the dotted decimal notation. The redirection feature does redirect this kind of ARP request.

·     The address is within a free IP segment. No redirection will take place, even if no host is present with the address.

·     The redirect URL is not in a free IP segment.

·     No server is using the redirect URL, or the server with the URL does not provide Web services.

Solution

To resolve the issue:

1.     Enter a dotted decimal IP address that is not in any free IP segments.

2.     Verify that the access device and the server are configured correctly.

3.     If the issue persists, contact H3C Support.