01-Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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11-Device management configuration
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11-Device management configuration 262.60 KB

Contents

Managing the device· 1

Device management tasks at a glance· 1

Configuring the device name· 2

Configuring the system time· 2

About the system time· 2

Restrictions and guidelines for configuring the system time· 2

System time configuration tasks at a glance· 2

Setting the system time at the CLI 3

Obtaining the UTC time through a time protocol 3

Setting the time zone· 3

Setting the daylight saving time· 3

Enabling displaying the copyright statement 4

Configuring banners· 4

Disabling password recovery capability· 5

Disabling BootWare menu access· 6

Setting the system operating mode· 6

Setting the hardware resource operating mode· 7

Specifying load sharing modes for a service card· 8

Setting the port status detection timer 8

Monitoring CPU usage· 8

Setting memory alarm thresholds· 10

Configuring resource monitoring· 13

Setting the temperature alarm thresholds· 14

Configuring hardware failure detection and protection· 15

Specifying the actions to be taken for hardware failures· 15

Configuring parity error logging for entries on forwarding chips· 16

Configuring consistency error logging for software and hardware forwarding entries· 16

Managing power supply· 17

About power supply management 17

Power supply management tasks at a glance· 17

Enabling power supply management 17

Specifying the number of redundant power supplies· 17

Enabling power supply sleeping· 18

Verifying and diagnosing transceiver modules· 18

Verifying transceiver modules· 18

Diagnosing transceiver modules· 19

Scheduling a task· 19

About task scheduling· 19

Restrictions and guidelines· 19

Procedure· 20

Example: Scheduling a task· 21

Locating devices· 24

About device locating· 24

Starting LED flashing· 24

Stopping LED flashing· 24

Isolating switching fabric modules· 25

Suppressing removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules· 25

Isolating a service module· 26

Rebooting the device· 26

About device reboot 26

Restrictions and guidelines for device reboot 27

Rebooting the device immediately at the CLI 27

Rebooting the standby MPU·· 27

Scheduling a device reboot 28

Restoring the factory-default configuration· 28

Display and maintenance commands for device management configuration· 28


Managing the device

This chapter describes how to configure basic device parameters and manage the device.

Device management tasks at a glance

All device management tasks are optional. You can perform any of the tasks in any order.

·     Configuring basic parameters

¡     Configuring the device name

¡     Configuring the system time

¡     Enabling displaying the copyright statement

¡     Configuring banners

·     Configuring security parameters

¡     Disabling password recovery capability

¡     Disabling BootWare menu access

·     Adjusting device capacities

¡     Setting the system operating mode

¡     Setting the hardware resource operating mode_Ref427224363Specifying load sharing modes for a service card

¡     Setting the port status detection timer

·     Monitoring the device

¡     Monitoring CPU usage

¡     Setting memory alarm thresholds

¡     Configuring resource monitoring

¡     Setting the temperature alarm thresholds

¡     Configuring hardware failure detection and protection

¡     Configuring parity error logging for entries on forwarding chips

¡     Configuring consistency error logging for software and hardware forwarding entries

·     Managing resources

¡     Managing power supply

¡     Verifying and diagnosing transceiver modules

·     Maintaining the device

¡     Scheduling a task

¡     Locating devices

¡     Isolating switching fabric modules

¡     Suppressing removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules

¡     Isolating a service module

¡     Rebooting the device

¡     Restoring the factory-default configuration

Configuring the device name

About the device name

A device name (also called hostname) identifies a device in a network and is used in CLI view prompts. For example, if the device name is Sysname, the user view prompt is <Sysname>.

Restrictions and guidelines

On an underlay network, the device uses the device name that you have configured for it. If you do not configure a device name for the device but automated underlay network deployment is enabled, the device uses the device name assigned by the VCF fabric feature. For more information about VCF fabric, see VCF fabric configuration in Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure the device name.

sysname sysname

By default, the device name is H3C.

Configuring the system time

About the system time

Correct system time is essential to network management and communication. Configure the system time correctly before you run the device on the network.

The device can use one of the following methods to obtain the system time:

·     Uses the locally set system time, and then uses the clock signals generated by its built-in crystal oscillator to maintain the system time.

·     Periodically obtains the UTC time from an NTP or PTP source, and uses the UTC time, time zone, and daylight saving time to calculate the system time. For more information about NTP and PTP, see Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

The system time calculated by using the UTC time from a time source is more precise.

Restrictions and guidelines for configuring the system time

After you configure the clock protocol none command, the clock datetime command determines the system time, whether or not the time zone or daylight saving time has been configured.

If you configure or change the time zone or daylight saving time after the device obtains the system time, the device recalculates the system time. To view the system time, use the display clock command.

System time configuration tasks at a glance

To configure the system time, perform the following tasks:

1.     Configuring the system time

Choose one of the following tasks:

¡     Setting the system time at the CLI

¡     Obtaining the UTC time through a time protocol

2.     (Optional.) Setting the time zone

Make sure each network device uses the time zone of the place where the device resides.

3.     (Optional.) Setting the daylight saving time

Make sure each network device uses the daylight saving time parameters of the place where the device resides.

Setting the system time at the CLI

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure the device to use the local system time.

clock protocol none

By default, the device uses the NTP time source.

If you execute the clock protocol command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

3.     Return to user view.

quit

4.     Set the local system time.

clock datetime time date

By default, the system time is UTC time 00:00:00 01/01/2011.

Obtaining the UTC time through a time protocol

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Specify the system time source.

clock protocol { ntp | ptp }

By default, the device uses the NTP time source.

If you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

3.     Configure time protocol parameters.

For more information about NTP or PTP configuration, see Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Setting the time zone

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the time zone.

clock timezone zone-name { add | minus } zone-offset

By default, the system uses the UTC time zone.

Setting the daylight saving time

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the daylight saving time.

clock summer-time name start-time start-date end-time end-date add-time

By default, the daylight saving time is not set.

Enabling displaying the copyright statement

About copyright statement displaying

This feature enables the device to display the copyright statement in the following situations:

·     When a Telnet or SSH user logs in.

·     When a console, AUX, or modem dial-in user quits user view. This is because the device automatically tries to restart the user session.

If you disable displaying the copyright statement, the device does not display the copyright statement in any situations.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable displaying the copyright statement.

copyright-info enable

By default, displaying the copyright statement is enabled.

Configuring banners

About banners

Banners are messages that the system displays when a user logs in.

The system supports the following banners:

·     Legal banner—Appears after the copyright statement. To continue login, the user must enter Y or press Enter. To quit the process, the user must enter N. Y and N are case insensitive.

·     Message of the Day (MOTD) banner—Appears after the legal banner and before the login banner.

·     Login banner—Appears only when password or scheme authentication is configured.

·     Shell banner—Appears when a user accesses user view.

The system displays the banners in the following order: legal banner, MOTD banner, login banner, and shell banner.

Banner input methods

You can configure a banner by using one of the following methods:

·     Input the entire command line in a single line.

The banner cannot contain carriage returns. The entire command line, including the command keywords, the banner, and the delimiters, can have a maximum of 511 characters. The delimiters for the banner can be any printable character but must be the same. You cannot press Enter before you input the end delimiter.

For example, you can configure the shell banner "Have a nice day." as follows:

<System> system-view

[System] header shell %Have a nice day.%

·     Input the command line in multiple lines.

The banner can contain carriage returns. A carriage return is counted as two characters.

To input a banner configuration command line in multiple lines, use one of the following methods:

¡     Press Enter after the final command keyword, type the banner, and end the final line with the delimiter character %. The banner plus the delimiter can have a maximum of 1999 characters.

For example, you can configure the banner "Have a nice day." as follows:

<System> system-view

[System] header shell

Please input banner content, and quit with the character '%'.

Have a nice day.%

¡     After you type the final command keyword, type any printable character as the start delimiter for the banner and press Enter. Then, type the banner and end the final line with the same delimiter. The banner plus the end delimiter can have a maximum of 1999 characters.

For example, you can configure the banner "Have a nice day." as follows:

<System> system-view

[System] header shell A

Please input banner content, and quit with the character 'A'.

Have a nice day.A

¡     After you type the final command keyword, type the start delimiter and part of the banner. Make sure the final character of the final string is different from the start delimiter. Then, press Enter, type the rest of the banner, and end the final line with the same delimiter. The banner plus the start and end delimiters can have a maximum of 2002 characters.

For example, you can configure the banner "Have a nice day." as follows:

<System> system-view

[System] header shell AHave a nice day.

Please input banner content, and quit with the character 'A'.

A

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure the legal banner.

header legal text

3.     Configure the MOTD banner.

header motd text

4.     Configure the login banner.

header login text

5.     Configure the shell banner.

header shell text

Disabling password recovery capability

About password recovery capability

Password recovery capability controls console user access to the device configuration and SDRAM from BootWare menus. For more information about BootWare menus, see the release notes.

If password recovery capability is enabled, a console user can access the device configuration without authentication to configure a new password.

If password recovery capability is disabled, console users must restore the factory-default configuration before they can configure new passwords. Restoring the factory-default configuration deletes the next-startup configuration files.

To enhance system security, disable password recovery capability.

Restrictions and guidelines

(In standalone mode.) (In IRF mode.) To access the device configuration without authentication, you must connect to the active MPU and access the BootWare menu while the MPU is starting up.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Disable password recovery capability.

undo password-recovery enable

By default, password recovery capability is enabled.

Disabling BootWare menu access

About BootWare menu access

By default, anyone can press Ctrl+B during device startup to access the BootWare menu, load software, and manage storage media. To prevent unauthorized access, disable BootWare menu access.

Procedure

To disable BootWare menu access, execute the following command in user view:

undo bootrom-access enable

By default, access to the BootWare menu is enabled.

Setting the system operating mode

About system operating modes

Supported features and feature specifications vary by system operating mode.

The device can operate in one of the following modes:

·     advance—Advanced mode.

·     bridgee—Enhanced Layer 2 mode.

·     expert—Expert mode.

·     standard—Standard mode.

Restrictions and guidelines

Change to the system operating mode takes effect after a device reboot.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the system operating mode.

system-working-mode { advance | bridgee | standard }

By default, the device operates in standard mode.

Setting the hardware resource operating mode

About hardware resource operating modes

The device supports multiple hardware resource operating modes. The capacities of the MAC address table, ARP and ND tables, and IPv4 and IPv6 routing tables vary by hardware resource operating mode.

The routing table capacities also vary by the hardware-resource routing-mode ipv6-128 command and the uRPF feature. Table 1 lists the capacities of the routing tables when the uRPF feature is disabled. When the uRPF feature is enabled, the capacities of the routing tables decrease by 50%. After the hardware-resource routing-mode ipv6-128 command is executed, the device supports IPv6 routes with prefixes longer than 64 bits. For information about this command, see Layer 3IP Routing Command Reference. For information about uRPF, see Security Configuration Guide.

The MAC address table, ARP and ND tables, and IPv4 and IPv6 routing tables share the same storage space. Table 1 lists the maximum capacities of the tables in various scenarios. Not all the maximum capacities can be reached at the same time.

The IPv4 and IPv6 routing table capacities can be reached at the same time only if the device operates in dual-stack mode and the hardware-resource routing-mode ipv6-128 command is executed.

The cells under IPv6-64 in the table show the routing table capacities when the hardware-resource routing-mode ipv6-128 command is not executed. The cells under IPv6-128 in the table show the routing table capacities after the hardware-resource routing-mode ipv6-128 command is executed. The following terms in the table represent the IPv6 address prefix length ranges: 0-64, 65-127, and 128.

In the case of IPv6-64 (65-127), the IPv6 routing table capacity is fixed at 0.

Table 1 Capacities of the tables in hardware resource operating modes

Mode

MAC address table

ARP/ND table

Routing tables (IPv6-64)

Routing tables (IPv6-128)

IPv4

IPv6

IPv4

IPv6

0-64

128

0-64

65-127

128

NORMAL

96K

80K/40K

162K

80K

40K/

38K

162K

64K

64K

73K

MAC

288K

16K/8K

32K

16K

7K

32K

8K

4K

8K

ROUTING

32K

16K /8K

324K

165K

8K

324K

72K

72K

73K

ARP

32K

272K/136K

32K

16K

163K

32K

11K

4K

143K

DUAL-STACK

32K

16K/8K

324K

165K

8K

90K

88K

88K

88K

Restrictions and guidelines

This setting takes effect after you save the running configuration and reboot the device. Before rebooting the device, make sure you know the possible impact on the network.

The capacities in the tables are the maximum sizes in theory. The actual capacities might be different.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the hardware resource operating mode.

hardware-resource tcam { ARP | DUAL-STACK | MAC | NORMAL | ROUTING }

By default, the hardware resource operating mode is NORMAL.

Specifying load sharing modes for a service card

Restrictions and guidelines

If you execute the fabric load-sharing mode command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Specify load sharing modes for a service card.

In standalone mode:

fabric load-sharing mode { { destination-ip | destination-mac | destination-port | ingress-port | source-ip | source-mac } * | flexible } slot slot-number

In IRF mode:

fabric load-sharing mode { { destination-ip | destination-mac | ingress-port | source-ip | source-mac } * | flexible } chassis chassis-number slot slot-number

By default, load sharing mode ingress-port is used for a service card.

Setting the port status detection timer

About the port status detection timer

The device starts a port status detection timer when a port is shut down by a protocol. Once the timer expires, the device brings up the port so the port status reflects the port's physical status.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the port status detection timer.

shutdown-interval time

The default setting is 30 seconds.

Monitoring CPU usage

About CPU usage monitoring

To monitor CPU usage, the device performs the following operations:

·     Samples CPU usage at 1-minute intervals, and compares the samples with CPU usage thresholds to identify the CPU usage status and send alarms or notifications accordingly.

·     Samples CPU core usage at 1-minute intervals, and compares the samples with CPU core usage thresholds to identify the CPU core usage status. If a sample is greater than the threshold, the device sends a log message.

·     Samples and saves CPU usage at a configurable interval if CPU usage tracking is enabled. You can use the display cpu-usage history command to display the historical CPU usage statistics in a coordinate system.

The device supports the following CPU usage thresholds:

·     Minor threshold—If the CPU usage increases to or above the minor threshold but is less than the severe threshold, the CPU usage enters minor alarm state. The device sends minor alarms periodically until the CPU usage increases above the severe threshold or the minor alarm is removed.

·     Severe threshold—If the CPU usage increases above the severe threshold, the CPU usage enters severe alarm state. The device sends severe alarms periodically until the severe alarm is removed.

·     Recovery threshold—If the CPU usage decreases below the recovery threshold, the CPU usage enters recovered state. The device sends a recovery notification.

CPU usage alarms and notifications can be sent to NETCONF, SNMP, and the information center to be encapsulated as NETCONF events, SNMP traps and informs, and log messages. For more information, see NETCONF, SNMP, and information center in Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Figure 1 CPU alarms and alarm-removed notifications

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the CPU usage alarm thresholds.

In standalone mode:

monitor cpu-usage threshold severe-threshold minor-threshold minor-threshold recovery-threshold recovery-threshold [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

monitor cpu-usage threshold severe-threshold { minor-threshold minor-threshold recovery-threshold recovery-threshold [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

The default settings are as follows:

¡     Severe CPU usage alarm threshold99%.

¡     Minor CPU usage alarm threshold80%.

¡     CPU usage recovery threshold60%.

3.     Set CPU usage alarm resending intervals.

In standalone mode:

monitor resend cpu-usage { minor-interval minor-interval | severe-interval severe-interval } * [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

monitor resend cpu-usage { minor-interval minor-interval | severe-interval severe-interval } * [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

By default, the minor alarm resending interval is 300 seconds and the severe alarm resending interval is 60 seconds.

4.     Set the sampling interval for CPU usage tracking.

In standalone mode:

monitor cpu-usage interval interval [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

monitor cpu-usage interval interval [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

By default, the sampling interval for CPU usage tracking is 1 minute.

5.     Enable CPU usage tracking.

In standalone mode:

monitor cpu-usage enable [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

monitor cpu-usage enable [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

By default, CPU usage tracking is enabled.

Setting memory alarm thresholds

About memory alarm thresholds

To ensure correct operation and improve memory efficiency, the system monitors the amount of free memory space in real time. If the amount of free memory space reaches the minor, severe, or critical alarm threshold, the system issues an alarm to affected service modules and processes.

(On devices that do not support low memory.) You can use the display memory command to display memory usage information.

(On devices that support low memory.) The system monitors only the amount of free low-memory space. You can use the display memory command to display memory usage information.

(On devices with slots that support low memory.) For slots that support low memory, the system monitors only the amount of free low-memory space. You can use the display memory command to display memory usage information. If the LowMem field is displayed for a slot, the slot supports low memory.

The early warning feature warns you of an approaching insufficient-memory condition.

As shown in Table 2, the system supports the following free-memory thresholds:

·     Sufficient-memory threshold.

·     Early-warning threshold.

·     Normal state threshold.

·     Minor alarm threshold.

·     Severe alarm threshold.

·     Critical alarm threshold.

Table 2 Memory alarm notifications and memory alarm-removed notifications

Notification

Triggering condition

Remarks

Early-warning notification

The amount of free memory space decreases below the early-warning threshold.

After generating and sending an early-warning notification, the system does not generate and send any additional early-warning notifications until the first early warning is removed.

Minor alarm notification

The amount of free memory space decreases below the minor alarm threshold.

After generating and sending a minor alarm notification, the system does not generate and send any additional minor alarm notifications until the first minor alarm is removed.

Severe alarm notification

The amount of free memory space decreases below the severe alarm threshold.

After generating and sending a severe alarm notification, the system does not generate and send any additional severe alarm notifications until the first severe alarm is removed.

Critical alarm notification

The amount of free memory space decreases below the critical alarm threshold.

After generating and sending a critical alarm notification, the system does not generate and send any additional critical alarm notifications until the first critical alarm is removed.

Critical alarm-removed notification

The amount of free memory space increases above the severe alarm threshold.

N/A

Severe alarm-removed notification

The amount of free memory space increases above the minor alarm threshold.

N/A

Minor alarm-removed notification

The amount of free memory space increases above the normal state threshold.

N/A

Early-warning-removed notification

The amount of free memory space increases above the sufficient-memory threshold.

N/A

Figure 2 Memory alarm notifications and alarm-removed notifications

Restrictions and guidelines

If a memory alarm occurs, delete unused configuration items or disable some features to increase the free memory space. Because the memory space is insufficient, some configuration items might not be able to be deleted.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the memory usage threshold.

In standalone mode:

memory-threshold [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ] usage memory-threshold

In IRF mode:

memory-threshold [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ] usage memory-threshold

By default, the memory usage threshold is 100%.

3.     Set the free-memory thresholds.

In standalone mode:

memory-threshold [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ] [ ratio ] minor minor-value severe severe-value critical critical-value normal normal-value [ early-warning early-warning-value secure secure-value ]

In IRF mode:

memory-threshold [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ] [ ratio ] minor minor-value severe severe-value critical critical-value normal normal-value [ early-warning early-warning-value secure secure-value ]

The default settings are as follows:

¡     Minor alarm threshold256 MB.

¡     Severe alarm threshold192 MB.

¡     Critical alarm threshold128 MB.

¡     Normal state threshold320 MB.

¡     Early-warning threshold384 MB.

¡     Sufficient-memory threshold448 MB.

4.     Set memory depletion alarm resending intervals.

In standalone mode:

monitor resend memory-threshold { critical-interval critical-interval | early-warning-interval early-warning-interval | minor-interval minor-interval | severe-interval severe-interval } * [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

monitor resend memory-threshold { critical-interval critical-interval | early-warning-interval early-warning-interval | minor-interval minor-interval | severe-interval severe-interval } * [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

The following are the default settings:

¡     Early warning resending interval—1 hour.

¡     Minor alarm resending interval—12 hours.

¡     Severe alarm resending interval—3 hours.

¡     Critical alarm resending interval—1 hour.

Configuring resource monitoring

About resource monitoring

The resource monitoring feature enables the device to monitor the available amounts of types of resources, for example, the space for ARP entries. The device samples the available amounts periodically and compares the samples with resource depletion thresholds to identify the resource depletion status.

The device supports a minor resource depletion threshold and a severe resource depletion threshold for each supported resource type.

·     If the available amount is equal to or less than the minor resource depletion threshold but greater than the severe resource depletion threshold, the resource type is in minor alarm state.

·     If the available amount is equal to or less than the severe resource depletion threshold, the resource type is in severe alarm state.

·     If the available amount increases above the minor resource depletion threshold, the resource type is in recovered state.

When a resource type enters severe alarm state, the device issues a severe alarm. If the resource type stays in severe alarm state, the device resends severe alarms periodically.

When a resource type enters minor alarm state, the device issues a minor alarm. If the resource type stays in minor alarm state or changes from severe alarm state to minor alarm state, the device identifies whether resending of minor resource depletion alarms is enabled. If the feature is disabled, the device does not issue additional minor alarms. If the feature is enabled, the device resends minor alarms periodically.

Resource depletion alarms can be sent to NETCONF, SNMP, and the information center to be encapsulated as NETCONF events, SNMP traps and informs, and log messages. For more information, see NETCONF, SNMP, and information center in Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Figure 3 Resource depletion alarms and alarm-removed notifications

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set resource depletion thresholds.

In standalone mode:

resource-monitor resource resource-name slot slot-number cpu cpu-number by-percent minor-threshold minor-threshold severe-threshold severe-threshold

In IRF mode:

resource-monitor resource resource-name chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cpu cpu-number by-percent minor-threshold minor-threshold severe-threshold severe-threshold

The default settings vary by resource type. Use the display resource-monitor command to display the resource depletion thresholds.

3.     Specify destinations for resource depletion alarms.

resource-monitor output { netconf-event | snmp-notification | syslog } *

By default, resource depletion alarms are sent to NETCONF, SNMP, and the information center.

4.     Enable resending of minor resource depletion alarms.

resource-monitor minor resend enable

By default, resending of minor resource depletion alarms is enabled.

Setting the temperature alarm thresholds

About temperature alarm thresholds

The device monitors its temperature based on the following thresholds:

·     Low-temperature threshold.

·     High-temperature warning threshold.

·     High-temperature alarming threshold.

When the device temperature drops below the low-temperature threshold or reaches the high-temperature warning or alarming threshold, the device performs the following operations:

·     Sends log messages and traps.

·     Sets LEDs on the device panel.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure the temperature alarm thresholds.

In standalone mode:

temperature-limit slot slot-number { hotspot | inflow } sensor-number lowlimit warninglimit [ alarmlimit ]

In IRF mode:

temperature-limit chassis chassis-number slot slot-number { hotspot | inflow } sensor-number lowlimit warninglimit [ alarmlimit ]

The defaults vary by temperature sensor model. To view the defaults, execute the undo temperature-limit and display environment commands in turn.

The high-temperature alarming threshold must be higher than the high-temperature warning threshold, and the high-temperature warning threshold must be higher than the low-temperature threshold.

Configuring hardware failure detection and protection

The device can automatically detect hardware failures on components, cards, and the forwarding plane, and take actions in response.

Specifying the actions to be taken for hardware failures

About actions for hardware failures

The device can take the following actions in response to hardware failures:

·     isolate—Performs the following tasks as appropriate to reduce impact from the failures:

¡     Shuts down the relevant ports.

¡     Prohibits loading software for the relevant cards.

¡     Isolates the relevant cards.

¡     Powers off the relevant cards.

·     reset—Restarts the relevant components or cards to recover from failures.

·     warning—Sends traps to report the failures.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Specify the action to be taken in response to a type of hardware failures.

hardware-failure-detection { board | chip | forwarding } { off | isolate | reset | warning }

By default, the system takes the action of warning in response to hardware failures.

Configuring parity error logging for entries on forwarding chips

About parity error logging for entries on forwarding chips

The device automatically detects parity errors in entries on forwarding chips. The parity error logging feature collects parity errors periodically, and generates a log message if the number of parity errors reaches the logging threshold.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the parity error statistics period for entries on forwarding chips.

parity-error monitor period value

The default parity error statistics period is 60 seconds for entries on forwarding chips.

3.     Set the parity error logging threshold for entries on forwarding chips.

parity-error monitor threshold value

The default parity error logging threshold is 5000 for entries on forwarding chips.

4.     Enable parity error logging for entries on forwarding chips.

parity-error monitor log enable

By default, parity error logging is disabled for entries on forwarding chips.

Configuring consistency error logging for software and hardware forwarding entries

About consistency error logging for software and hardware forwarding entries

To forward packets, the device generates hardware forwarding entries in forwarding chips and software forwarding entries in memory at the same time. The device automatically detects whether the hardware forwarding entries and the software forwarding entries are consistent.

The consistency error logging for software and hardware forwarding entries enables the device to collect statistics for consistency errors periodically. If the number of consistency errors reaches or exceeds the logging threshold, the device generates a log message.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Set the statistics period for consistency errors between software and hardware forwarding entries.

parity-error consistency-check period value

The default statistics period is 3600 seconds.

3.     Set the logging threshold for consistency errors between software and hardware forwarding entries.

parity-error consistency-check threshold value

The default logging threshold is 10.

4.     Enable consistency error logging for software and hardware forwarding entries.

parity-error consistency-check log enable

By default, consistency error logging is disabled for software and hardware forwarding entries.

Managing power supply

About power supply management

Power supplies might have problems such as overload overcurrent, overvoltage, overtemperature, and short circuit. Some power supplies use a hardware protection measure, for example, powering off the device, to protect the entire device from being damaged. The hardware protection measure helps protect the device but causes service outage. The power supply management feature can minimize service outage while protecting the device against overload problems.

The power supply management feature constantly monitors the available power and the system loads. If a potential power supply overload problem is found, this feature takes protective measures immediately to remove requirements for power supply hardware protection. Examples of protective measures include sending a notification, starting redundant power supplies, and powering off certain interface cards.

Power supply management tasks at a glance

To manage power supply, perform the following tasks:

1.     Enabling power supply management

2.     (Optional.) Specifying the number of redundant power supplies

To avoid overload problems, you can install redundant power supplies.

3.     ‌(Optional.) Enabling power supply sleeping

This feature decreases energy consumption.

 

Enabling power supply management

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable power supply management.

In standalone mode:

power-supply policy enable

In IRF mode:

power-supply policy chassis chassis-number enable

By default, power supply management is enabled.

Specifying the number of redundant power supplies

About power supply redundancy

To avoid overload problems, you can install redundant power supplies. For example, if the device requires a minimum of N power supplies to operate correctly, you can install M power supplies (M > N). The M power supplies operate in load balance mode. When a power supply fails, the load is rebalanced among the other power supplies.

After you specify the number of redundant power supplies, the device compares the maximum power consumption of a newly added card with the remaining power.

·     If the remaining power is sufficient for the card, the device powers on the card.

·     If the power is insufficient, the device does not power on the card. You can add power supplies or scale the number of redundant power supplies down.

Restrictions and guidelines

This feature takes effect only if power supply management is enabled.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Specify the number of redundant power supplies.

In standalone mode:

power-supply policy redundant module-count

In IRF mode:

power-supply policy chassis chassis-number redundant module-count

The default setting is 0.

Enabling power supply sleeping

About power supply sleeping

This feature enables the device to monitor the remaining power in real time.

·     If the remaining power is greater than the power of a power supply, the device places the power supply into sleeping state.

·     When the remaining power becomes insufficient, the device wakes up a sleeping power supply.

Restrictions and guidelines

This feature is supported only on switches that contain the PSR2400-54A, PSR2400-54D, or PSR3000-54A power module.

This feature takes effect only when power supply management is enabled.

Power supply modules in sleeping state cannot act as the backup power supplies. When an operating power supply fails or is removed, the device might not be able to operate correctly.

To view the operating status of power supplies, execute the display power command.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable power supply sleeping.

power-supply surplus-sleeping enable

Verifying and diagnosing transceiver modules

Verifying transceiver modules

About transceiver module verification

You can use one of the following methods to verify the genuineness of a transceiver module:

·     Display the key parameters of a transceiver module, including its transceiver type, connector type, central wavelength of the transmit laser, transfer distance, and vendor name.

·     Display its electronic label. The electronic label is a profile of the transceiver module and contains the permanent configuration, including the serial number, manufacturing date, and vendor name. The data was written to the transceiver module or the device's storage component during debugging or testing of the transceiver module or device.

The device regularly checks transceiver modules for their vendor names. If a transceiver module does not have a vendor name or the vendor name is not H3C, the device repeatedly outputs traps and log messages. For information about logging rules, see Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Procedure

To verify transceiver modules, execute the following commands in any view:

·     Display the key parameters of transceiver modules.

display transceiver interface [ interface-type interface-number ]

·     Display the electrical label information of transceiver modules.

display transceiver manuinfo interface [ interface-type interface-number ]

Diagnosing transceiver modules

About transceiver module diagnosis

The device provides the alarm and digital diagnosis functions for transceiver modules. When a transceiver module fails or is not operating correctly, you can perform the following tasks:

·     Check the alarms that exist on the transceiver module to identify the fault source.

·     Examine the key parameters monitored by the digital diagnosis function, including the temperature, voltage, laser bias current, TX power, and RX power.

Procedure

To diagnose transceiver modules, execute the following commands in any view:

·     Display transceiver alarms.

display transceiver alarm interface [ interface-type interface-number ]

·     Display the current values of the digital diagnosis parameters on transceiver modules.

display transceiver diagnosis interface [ interface-type interface-number ]

Scheduling a task

About task scheduling

You can schedule the device to automatically execute a command or a set of commands without administrative interference.

You can configure a periodic schedule or a non-periodic schedule. A non-periodic schedule is not saved to the configuration file and is lost when the device reboots. A periodic schedule is saved to the startup configuration file and is automatically executed periodically.

Restrictions and guidelines

·     The default system time is always restored at reboot. To make sure a task schedule can be executed as expected, reconfigure the system time or configure NTP or PTP after you reboot the device. For more information about NTP and PTP, see Network Management and Monitoring Configuration Guide.

·     To assign a command (command A) to a job, you must first assign the job the command or commands for entering the view of command A.

·     Make sure all commands in a schedule are compliant to the command syntax. The system does not check the syntax when you assign a command to a job.

·     A schedule cannot contain any one of these commands: telnet, ftp, ssh2, and monitor process.

·     A schedule does not support user interaction. If a command requires a yes or no answer, the system always assumes that a Y or Yes is entered. If a command requires a character string input, the system assumes that either the default character string (if any) or a null string is entered.

·     A schedule is executed in the background, and no output (except for logs, traps, and debug information) is displayed for the schedule.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a job.

scheduler job job-name

3.     Assign a command to the job.

command id command

By default, no command is assigned to a job.

You can assign multiple commands to a job. A command with a smaller ID is executed first.

4.     Exit to system view.

quit

5.     Create a schedule.

scheduler schedule schedule-name

6.     Assign a job to the schedule.

job job-name

By default, no job is assigned to a schedule.

You can assign multiple jobs to a schedule. The jobs will be executed concurrently.

7.     Assign user roles to the schedule.

user-role role-name

By default, a schedule has the user role of the schedule creator.

You can assign a maximum of 64 user roles to a schedule. A command in a schedule can be executed if it is permitted by one or more user roles of the schedule.

8.     Specify the execution time for the schedule.

Choose one option as needed:

¡     Execute the schedule at specific points of time.

time at time date

time once at time [ month-date month-day | week-day week-day&<1-7> ]

¡     Execute the schedule after a period of time.

time once delay time

¡     Execute the schedule at the specified time on every specified day in a month or week.

time repeating at time [ month-date [ month-day | last ] | week-day week-day&<1-7> ]

¡     Execute the schedule periodically from the specified time on.

time repeating [ at time [date ] ] interval interval

By default, no execution time is specified for a schedule.

The time commands overwrite each other. The most recently configured command takes effect.

9.     (Optional.) Set the schedule log file size limit.

scheduler logfile size value

By default, the schedule log file size limit is 16 KB.

The schedule log file stores log messages for execution results of commands in jobs. After the limit is reached, the system deletes the oldest log messages to store the new log messages. If the remaining space of the log file is not enough for a single log message, the system truncates the message and does not store the extra part.

Example: Scheduling a task

Network configuration

As shown in Figure 4, two interfaces of the device are connected to users.

To save energy, configure the device to perform the following operations:

·     Enable the interfaces at 8:00 a.m. every Monday through Friday.

·     Disable the interfaces at 18:00 every Monday through Friday.

Figure 4 Network diagram

Procedure

# Enter system view.

<Sysname> system-view

# Configure a job for disabling interface HundredGigE 1/0/1.

[Sysname] scheduler job shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1] command 1 system-view

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1] command 2 interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1] command 3 shutdown

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure a job for enabling interface HundredGigE 1/0/1.

[Sysname] scheduler job start-HundredGigE1/0/1

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/1] command 1 system-view

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/1] command 2 interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/1] command 3 undo shutdown

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure a job for disabling interface HundredGigE 1/0/2.

[Sysname] scheduler job shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2] command 1 system-view

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2] command 2 interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2] command 3 shutdown

[Sysname-job-shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure a job for enabling interface HundredGigE 1/0/2.

[Sysname] scheduler job start-HundredGigE1/0/2

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/2] command 1 system-view

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/2] command 2 interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/2] command 3 undo shutdown

[Sysname-job-start-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure a periodic schedule for enabling the interfaces at 8:00 a.m. every Monday through Friday.

[Sysname] scheduler schedule START-pc1/pc2

[Sysname-schedule-START-pc1/pc2] job start-HundredGigE1/0/1

[Sysname-schedule-START-pc1/pc2] job start-HundredGigE1/0/2

[Sysname-schedule-START-pc1/pc2] time repeating at 8:00 week-day mon tue wed thu fri

[Sysname-schedule-START-pc1/pc2] quit

# Configure a periodic schedule for disabling the interfaces at 18:00 every Monday through Friday.

[Sysname] scheduler schedule STOP-pc1/pc2

[Sysname-schedule-STOP-pc1/pc2] job shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1

[Sysname-schedule-STOP-pc1/pc2] job shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2

[Sysname-schedule-STOP-pc1/pc2] time repeating at 18:00 week-day mon tue wed thu fri

[Sysname-schedule-STOP-pc1/pc2] quit

Verifying the configuration

# Display the configuration information of all jobs.

[Sysname] display scheduler job

Job name: shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1

 system-view

 interface hundredgige 1/0/1

 shutdown

 

Job name: shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2

 system-view

 interface hundredgige 1/0/2

 shutdown

 

Job name: start-HundredGigE1/0/1

 system-view

 interface hundredgige 1/0/1

 undo shutdown

 

Job name: start-HundredGigE1/0/2

 system-view

 interface hundredgige 1/0/2

 undo shutdown

# Display the schedule information.

[Sysname] display scheduler schedule

Schedule name        : START-pc1/pc2

Schedule type        : Run on every Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri at 08:00:00

Start time           : Wed Sep 28 08:00:00 2011

Last execution time  : Wed Sep 28 08:00:00 2011

Last completion time : Wed Sep 28 08:00:03 2011

Execution counts     : 1

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Job name                                          Last execution status

start-HundredGigE1/0/1                                 Successful

start-HundredGigE1/0/2                                 Successful

 

Schedule name        : STOP-pc1/pc2

Schedule type        : Run on every Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri at 18:00:00

Start time           : Wed Sep 28 18:00:00 2011

Last execution time  : Wed Sep 28 18:00:00 2011

Last completion time : Wed Sep 28 18:00:01 2011

Execution counts     : 1

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Job name                                          Last execution status

shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1                              Successful

shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2                              Successful

# Display schedule log information.

[Sysname] display scheduler logfile

Job name        : start-HundredGigE1/0/1

Schedule name   : START-pc1/pc2

Execution time  : Wed Sep 28 08:00:00 2011

Completion time : Wed Sep 28 08:00:02 2011

--------------------------------- Job output -----------------------------------

<Sysname>system-view

System View: return to User View with Ctrl+Z.

[Sysname]interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1]undo shutdown

 

Job name        : start-HundredGigE1/0/2

Schedule name   : START-pc1/pc2

Execution time  : Wed Sep 28 08:00:00 2011

Completion time : Wed Sep 28 08:00:02 2011

--------------------------------- Job output -----------------------------------

<Sysname>system-view

System View: return to User View with Ctrl+Z.

[Sysname]interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/2]undo shutdown

 

Job name        : shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/1

Schedule name   : STOP-pc1/pc2

Execution time  : Wed Sep 28 18:00:00 2011

Completion time : Wed Sep 28 18:00:01 2011

--------------------------------- Job output -----------------------------------

<Sysname>system-view

System View: return to User View with Ctrl+Z.

[Sysname]interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1]shutdown

 

Job name        : shutdown-HundredGigE1/0/2

Schedule name   : STOP-pc1/pc2

Execution time  : Wed Sep 28 18:00:00 2011

Completion time : Wed Sep 28 18:00:01 2011

--------------------------------- Job output -----------------------------------

<Sysname>system-view

System View: return to User View with Ctrl+Z.

[Sysname]interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/2]shutdown

Locating devices

About device locating

The device provides the RUN LED for device locating. The locator blink blink-time command flashes the RUN LEDquickly for a specified period of time unless you execute the locator blink stop command.

Starting LED flashing

To start LED flashing, execute one of the following commands in user view:

In standalone mode:

locator blink blink-time

In IRF mode:

locator [ chassis chassis-number ] blink blink-time

Stopping LED flashing

To stop LED flashing, execute one of the following commands in user view:

In standalone mode:

locator blink stop

In IRF mode:

locator [ chassis chassis-number ] blink stop

Isolating switching fabric modules

About switching fabric module isolation

Isolating a switching fabric module isolates the module from the data plane. An isolated switching fabric module continues to communicate with the MPU, and can forward traffic immediately after the isolation is canceled. The isolation does not affect protocol packet parsing and protocol calculation on the control plane.

Restrictions and guidelines

CAUTION

CAUTION:

·     Do not isolate the only switching fabric module of the device.

·     Do not reboot the device when a switching fabric module is isolated.

 

Isolate a switching fabric module only if required. If the device has multiple switching fabric modules, isolating a switching fabric module or channel decreases the forwarding bandwidth and reduces the forwarding performance.

You can isolate switching fabric modules to identify whether switching fabric modules can forward traffic correctly.

Before replacing a switching fabric module, you can isolate the module to prevent packet loss.

To use an isolated switching fabric module or channel, use the undo switch-fabric isolate command to cancel the isolation.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Isolate a switching fabric module or channel.

In standalone mode:

switch-fabric isolate slot slot-number [ channel channel-number ]

In IRF mode:

switch-fabric isolate chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ channel channel-number ]

By default, a switching fabric module is not isolated and can forward traffic.

Suppressing removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules

About suppressing removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules

Typically, removing a switching fabric module triggers one removal interrupt signal. Upon receiving the signal, the system switches traffic on the switching fabric module to other switching fabric modules to ensure service continuity. Upon hardware failure or signal interference, however, removal interrupt signals might be frequently triggered. To prevent the interrupt signals from affecting system operation, use this feature to suppress the interrupt signals.

Restrictions and guidelines

Suppressing removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules might result in packet loss and service outage.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Suppress removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules.

switch-fabric removal-signal-suppression

By default, removal interrupt signals from switching fabric modules are not suppressed.

Isolating a service module

About service module isolation

When a service module fails, you can use this feature to isolate it to prevent it from affecting traffic forwarding. An isolated service module does not receive traffic.

Restrictions and guidelines

A service module reboot cancels the isolation of the service module.

To display service module operating status, execute the display device command. An isolated service module is in Offline state.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Isolate a service module.

In standalone mode:

switch-linecard isolate slot slot-number

In IRF mode:

switch-linecard isolate chassis chassis-number slot slot-number

Rebooting the device

About device reboot

The following device reboot methods are available:

·     Schedule a reboot at the CLI, so the device automatically reboots at the specified time or after the specified period of time.

·     Immediately reboot the device at the CLI.

This method allows you to reboot the device remotely.

During the reboot process, the device performs the following operations:

a.     Resets all of its chips.

b.     Uses the BootWare to verify the startup software package, decompress the package, and load the images.

c.     Initializes the system.

·     Power off and then power on the device. This method might cause data loss, and is the least-preferred method.

Using the CLI, you can reboot the device from a remote host.

Restrictions and guidelines for device reboot

A device reboot might result in a service outage.

For data security, the device does not reboot while it is performing file operations.

Rebooting the device immediately at the CLI

Prerequisites

Perform the following steps in any view:

1.     Verify that the next-startup configuration file is correctly specified.

display startup

For more information about the display startup command, see Fundamentals Command Reference.

2.     Verify that the startup image files are correctly specified.

display boot-loader

If one main startup image file is damaged or does not exist, you must specify another main startup image file before rebooting the device.

For more information about the display boot-loader command, see Fundamentals Command Reference.

3.     Save the running configuration to the next-startup configuration file.

save

To avoid configuration loss, save the running configuration before a reboot.

For more information about the save command, see Fundamentals Command Reference.

Procedure

To reboot the device immediately at the CLI, execute one of the following commands in user view:

In standalone mode:

reboot [ slot slot-number ] [ force ]

In IRF mode:

reboot [ chassis chassis-number [ slot slot-number ] ] [ force ]

Rebooting the standby MPU

About rebooting the standby MPU

Using this feature has the same effect as specifying the slot number for the reboot slot slot-number command and executing the command. This feature does not require you to specify an argument and is easier to use.

Restrictions and guidelines

This feature is available only in standalone mode.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Reboot the standby MPU.

restart standby

Scheduling a device reboot

Restrictions and guidelines

(In standalone mode.) The automatic reboot configuration is canceled if an active/standby switchover occurs.

(In IRF mode.) The automatic reboot configuration is effective on all member devices. It will be canceled if a switchover between the global active MPU and a global standby MPU occurs.

The device supports only one device reboot schedule. If you execute the scheduler reboot command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Procedure

To schedule a reboot, execute one of the following commands in user view:

·     scheduler reboot at time [ date ]

·     scheduler reboot delay time

By default, no device reboot time is specified.

Restoring the factory-default configuration

About restoring the factory-default configuration

If you want to use the device in a different scenario or you cannot troubleshoot the device by using other methods, use this task to restore the factory-default configuration.

This task does not delete .bin files.

Restrictions and guidelines

This feature is disruptive.

Procedure

1.     Execute the following command in user view to restore the factory-default configuration for the device:

restore factory-default

2.     Reboot the device.

reboot

When the command prompts you to choose whether to save the running configuration, enter N. If you choose to save the running configuration, the device loads the saved configuration at startup.

Display and maintenance commands for device management configuration

Execute display commands in any view. Execute the reset scheduler logfile command in user view. Execute the reset version-update-record command in system view.

 

Task

Command

Display device alarm information.

In standalone mode:

display alarm [ slot slot-number ]

In IRF mode:

display alarm [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number ]

Display the BootWare menu access authorization status.

display bootrom-access

Display the system time, date, time zone, and daylight saving time.

display clock

Display the copyright statement.

display copyright

Display CPU usage statistics.

The core keyword is mutually exclusive with the control-plane and data-plane keywords.

In standalone mode:

display cpu-usage [ control-plane | data-plane ]  [ summary ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number [ core { core-number | all } ] ] ]

In IRF mode:

display cpu-usage [ control-plane | data-plane ]  [ summary ] [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number [ core { core-number | all } ] ] ]

Display CPU usage monitoring settings.

In standalone mode:

display cpu-usage configuration [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

display cpu-usage configuration [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Display the historical CPU usage statistics in a coordinate system.

In standalone mode:

display cpu-usage history [ job job-id ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

display cpu-usage history [ job job-id ] [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Display hardware information.

In standalone mode:

display device[ flash | usb ]  [ slot slot-number | verbose ]

In IRF mode:

display device[ flash | usb ]  [ chassis chassis-number [ slot slot-number [ subslot subslot-number ] ] | verbose ]

Display electronic label information for the device.

In standalone mode:

display device manuinfo [ slot slot-number [ subslot subslot-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

display device manuinfo [ chassis chassis-number [ slot slot-number [ subslot subslot-number ] ] ]

Display electronic label information for the chassis backplane.

In standalone mode:

display device manuinfo chassis-only

In IRF mode:

display device manuinfo chassis chassis-number chassis-only

Display electronic label information for a fan tray.

In standalone mode:

display device manuinfo fan fan-id

In IRF mode:

display device manuinfo chassis chassis-number fan fan-id

Display electronic label information for a power supply.

In standalone mode:

display device manuinfo power power-id

In IRF mode:

display device manuinfo chassis chassis-number power power-id

Display or save operating information for features and hardware modules.

display diagnostic-information [ hardware | infrastructure | l2 | l3 | service ] [ key-info ] [ filename ]

Display device temperature information.

In standalone mode:

display environment [ slot slot-number ]

In IRF mode:

display environment [ chassis chassis-number [ slot slot-number ] ]

Display the operating states of fan trays.

In standalone mode:

display fan [ fan-id ] [ verbose ]

In IRF mode:

display fan [ chassis chassis-number [ fan-id ] ] [ verbose ]

Display hardware failure detection and fix information.

display hardware-failure-detection

Display hardware resource operating mode information.

display hardware-resource [ tcam ]

Display memory usage statistics.

In standalone mode:

display memory [ summary ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

display memory [ summary ] [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Display memory alarm thresholds and statistics.

In standalone mode:

display memory-threshold [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

display memory-threshold [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Display power supply information.

In standalone mode:

display power [ power-id | verbose ]

In IRF mode:

display power [ chassis chassis-number [ power-id | verbose ] ]

Display power supply management information.

In standalone mode:

display power-supply [ verbose ]

In IRF mode:

display power-supply [ chassis chassis-number ] [ verbose ]

Display resource monitoring information.

In standalone mode:

display resource-monitor [ resource resource-name ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

In IRF mode:

display resource-monitor [ resource resource-name ] [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Display job configuration information.

display scheduler job [ job-name ]

Display job execution log information.

display scheduler logfile

Display the automatic reboot schedule.

display scheduler reboot

Display schedule information.

display scheduler schedule [ schedule-name ]

Display system stability and status information.

display system stable state

Display system version information.

display version

Display startup software image upgrade records.

display version-update-record

Clear job execution log information.

reset scheduler logfile

Clear startup software image upgrade records.

reset version-update-record

 

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