03-Layer 2—LAN Switching Command Reference

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03-Ethernet interface commands
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Contents

Ethernet interface commands· 1

Common Ethernet interface commands· 1

bandwidth· 1

broadcast-suppression· 1

dampening· 3

default 4

description· 5

display counters· 5

display counters rate· 6

display ethernet statistics· 8

display interface· 10

display interface split-capable· 21

display interface link-info· 21

display interface main· 23

display link-flap protection· 26

display packet-drop· 27

display priority-flow-control 28

duplex· 30

flow-control 30

flow-control receive enable· 31

flow-interval 32

interface· 32

jumboframe enable· 33

link-delay· 33

link-flap protect enable· 35

loopback· 35

multicast-suppression· 36

port fec mode· 37

port ifmonitor crc-error 38

port ifmonitor input-error 39

port ifmonitor output-error 40

port link-flap protect enable· 41

port link-mode· 42

port training· 43

port up-mode· 44

priority-flow-control (Ethernet interface view) 44

priority-flow-control (system view) 45

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action· 46

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover cos· 47

priority-flow-control deadlock cos· 48

priority-flow-control deadlock enable· 49

priority-flow-control deadlock precision· 50

priority-flow-control deadlock recover 51

priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode· 52

priority-flow-control deadlock threshold· 53

priority-flow-control dot1p headroom·· 54

priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer dynamic· 55

priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer static· 56

priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-threshold-offset 57

priority-flow-control dot1p reserved-buffer 58

priority-flow-control early-warning inpps· 58

priority-flow-control early-warning outpps· 59

priority-flow-control inner-port enable· 60

priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop· 61

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p (Ethernet interface view) 62

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p (system view) 63

priority-flow-control poolID headroom·· 64

reset counters interface· 65

reset ethernet statistics· 65

reset packet-drop interface· 66

shutdown· 67

snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor 67

speed· 68

unicast-suppression· 69

using hundredgige· 70

using tengige· 71

using twenty-fivegige· 72

Layer 2 Ethernet interface commands· 72

display storm-constrain· 72

storm-constrain· 74

storm-constrain control 75

storm-constrain enable log· 76

storm-constrain enable trap· 77

storm-constrain interval 77

Layer 3 Ethernet interface or subinterface commands· 78

mac-address· 78

mtu· 79

 


Ethernet interface commands

Common Ethernet interface commands

bandwidth

Use bandwidth to set the expected bandwidth of an interface.

Use undo bandwidth to restore the default.

Syntax

bandwidth bandwidth-value

undo bandwidth

Default

The expected bandwidth (in kbps) is the interface baud rate divided by 1000.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Ethernet subinterface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

bandwidth-value: Specifies the expected bandwidth in the range of 1 to 400000000 kbps.

Usage guidelines

The expected bandwidth is an informational parameter used only by higher-layer protocols for calculation. You cannot adjust the actual bandwidth of an interface by using this command.

Examples

# Set the expected bandwidth of HundredGigE 1/0/1 to 1000 kbps.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] bandwidth 1000

# Set the expected bandwidth of HundredGigE 1/0/1.1 to 1000 kbps.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1.1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1] bandwidth 1000

Related commands

speed

broadcast-suppression

Use broadcast-suppression to enable broadcast suppression and set the broadcast suppression threshold.

Use undo broadcast-suppression to disable broadcast suppression.

Syntax

broadcast-suppression { ratio | pps max-pps | kbps max-kbps }

undo broadcast-suppression

Default

Ethernet interfaces do not suppress broadcast traffic.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

ratio: Sets the broadcast suppression threshold as a percentage of the interface bandwidth. The value range for this argument is 0 to 100. A smaller value means that less broadcast traffic is allowed to pass through.

pps max-pps: Specifies the maximum number of broadcast packets that the interface can forward per second. The value range for the max-pps argument (in pps) is 0 to 1.4881 × the interface bandwidth.

kbps max-kbps: Specifies the maximum number of kilobits of broadcast traffic that the Ethernet interface can forward per second. The value range for this argument (in kbps) is 0 to the interface bandwidth.

Usage guidelines

The broadcast storm suppression features limits the size of broadcast traffic to a threshold on an interface. When the broadcast traffic on the interface exceeds this threshold, the system drops packets until the traffic drops below this threshold.

Both the storm-constrain command and the broadcast-suppression command can suppress broadcast storms on a port. The broadcast-suppression command uses the chip to physically suppress broadcast traffic. It has less influence on the device performance than the storm-constrain command, which uses software to suppress broadcast traffic.

For the traffic suppression result to be determined, do not configure both the storm-constrain broadcast command and the broadcast-suppression command on an interface.

When you configure the suppression threshold in kbps, the actual suppression threshold might be different from the configured one as follows:

·     If the configured value is smaller than 64, the value of 64 takes effect.

·     If the configured value is greater than 64 but not an integer multiple of 64, the integer multiple of 64 that is greater than and closest to the configured value takes effect.

To determine the suppression threshold that takes effect, see the prompts on the switch.

Set the same type of thresholds for each interface.

Examples

# Set the broadcast suppression threshold to 10000 kbps on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] broadcast-suppression kbps 10000

The actual value is 10048 on port HundredGigE1/0/1 currently.

The output shows that the value that takes effect is 10048 kbps (157 times of 64), because the chip only supports step 64.

Related commands

multicast-suppression

unicast-suppression

dampening

Use dampening to enable the device to dampen an interface when the interface is flapping.

Use undo dampening to restore the default.

Syntax

dampening [ half-life reuse suppress max-suppress-time ]

undo dampening

Default

Interface dampening is disabled on Ethernet interfaces.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

half-life: Specifies the amount of time after which a penalty is decreased, in the range of 1 to 120 seconds. The default value is 54 seconds.

reuse: Specifies the reuse threshold in the range of 200 to 20000. The default value is 750. The reuse threshold must be less than the suppression threshold.

suppress: Specifies the suppression threshold in the range of 200 to 20000. The default value is 2000.

max-suppress-time: Specifies the maximum amount of time the interface can be dampened, in the range of 1 to 255 seconds. The default value is 162 seconds (three times the half-life timer).

Usage guidelines

When configuring the dampening command, follow these rules to set the values mentioned above:

·     The ceiling is equal to 2 (Max-suppress-time/Decay) × reuse-limits. It is not user configurable.

·     The configured suppress limit is lower than or equal to the ceiling.

·     The ceiling is lower than or equal to the maximum suppress limit supported.

This command, the link-delay command, and the port link-flap protect enable command are mutually exclusive on an interface.

This command does not take effect on the administratively down events. When you execute the shutdown command, the penalty restores to 0, and the interface reports the down event to the higher layer protocols.

Do not enable the dampening function on an interface with RRPP, MSTP, or Smart Link enabled.

After an interface in down state is dampened, the interface state displayed through the display interface command is always down.

Examples

# Enable interface dampening on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] dampening

# Enable interface dampening on HundredGigE 1/0/1, and set the following parameters:

·     Half life time to 2 seconds.

·     Reuse value to 800.

·     Suppression threshold to 3000.

·     Maximum suppression interval to 5 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] dampening 2 800 3000 5

Related commands

display interface

link-delay

port link-flap protect enable

default

Use default to restore the default settings for an interface.

Syntax

default

Views

Ethernet interface view

Ethernet subinterface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

CAUTION

CAUTION:

The default command might interrupt ongoing network services. Make sure you are fully aware of the impacts of this command when you use it in a live network.

This command might fail to restore the default settings for some commands because of command dependencies or system restrictions. You can use the display this command in interface view to identify these commands, and use their undo forms or follow the command reference to restore their default settings. If your restoration attempt still fails, follow the error message instructions to solve the problem.

Examples

# Restore the default settings for HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] default

# Restore the default settings for HundredGigE 1/0/1.1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1.1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1] default

description

Use description to configure the description of an interface.

Use undo description to restore the default.

Syntax

description text

undo description

Default

The description of an interface is the interface name plus Interface (for example, HundredGigE1/0/1 Interface).

Views

Ethernet interface view

Ethernet subinterface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

text: Specifies the interface description, a case-sensitive string of 1 to 255 characters.

Examples

# Set the description of HundredGigE 1/0/1 to lan-interface.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] description lan-interface

# Set the description of HundredGigE 1/0/1.1 to subinterface1/0/1.1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1.1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1] description subinterface1/0/1.1

display counters

Use display counters to display interface traffic statistics.

Syntax

display counters { inbound | outbound } interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

inbound: Displays inbound traffic statistics.

outbound: Displays outbound traffic statistics.

interface-type: Specifies an interface type.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number.

Usage guidelines

To clear the Ethernet interface traffic statistics, use the reset counters interface command.

If you do not specify an interface type, this command displays traffic statistics for all interfaces that have traffic counters.

If you specify an interface type but do not specify an interface number, this command displays traffic statistics for all interfaces of the specified type.

If you specify an interface type and number, this command displays traffic statistics for the specified interface.

Examples

# Display inbound traffic statistics for all interfaces.

<Sysname> display counters inbound interface

Interface            Total (pkts)    Broadcast (pkts)    Multicast (pkts)  Err (pkts)

HGE1/0/1                       --                  --                  --           0

HGE1/0/2                       --                  --                  --    Overflow

 

 Overflow: More than 14 digits (7 digits for column "Err").

       --: Not supported.

Table 1 Command output

Field

Description

Interface

Abbreviated interface name.

Total (pkts)

Total number of packets received or sent through the interface.

Broadcast (pkts)

Total number of broadcast packets received or sent through the interface.

Multicast (pkts)

Total number of multicast packets received or sent through the interface.

Err (pkts)

Total number of error packets received or sent through the interface.

Overflow: More than 14 digits (7 digits for column "Err")

The command displays Overflow when any of the following conditions exist:

·     The data length of an Err field value is greater than 7 decimal digits.

·     The data length of a non-Err field value is greater than 14 decimal digits.

--: Not supported

The statistical item is not supported.

Related commands

reset counters interface

display counters rate

Use display counters rate to display traffic rate statistics for interfaces in up state for the most recent statistics polling interval.

Syntax

display counters rate { inbound | outbound } interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

inbound: Displays inbound traffic rate statistics.

outbound: Displays outbound traffic rate statistics.

interface-type: Specifies an interface type.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify an interface type, this command displays traffic rate statistics for all up interfaces that have traffic counters.

If you specify an interface type but do not specify an interface number, this command displays traffic rate statistics for all up interfaces of the specified type.

If you specify an interface type and an interface, this command displays traffic rate statistics for the specified interface.

If an interface that you specify is always down for the most recent statistics polling interval, the system prompts that the interface does not support the command.

To set the statistics polling interval, use the flow-interval command.

Examples

# Display the inbound traffic rate statistics for all interfaces.

<Sysname> display counters rate inbound interface

Usage: Bandwidth utilization in percentage

Interface            Usage (%)   Total (pps)   Broadcast (pps)   Multicast (pps)

HGE1/0/1                    0             0                --                --

 

 Overflow: More than 14 digits.

       --: Not supported.

Table 2 Command output

Field

Description

Interface

Abbreviated interface name.

Usage (%)

Bandwidth usage (in percentage) of the interface for the last statistics polling interval.

Total (pps)

Average receiving or sending rate (in pps) for unicast packets for the last statistics polling interval.

Broadcast (pps)

Average receiving or sending rate (in pps) for broadcast packets for the last statistics polling interval.

Multicast (pps)

Average receiving or sending rate (in pps) for multicast packets for the last statistics polling interval. .

Overflow: more than 14 decimal digits

The command displays Overflow if the data length of a statistical item is greater than 14 decimal digits.

--: not supported

The statistical item is not supported.

Related commands

flow-interval

reset counters interface

display ethernet statistics

Use display ethernet statistics to display the Ethernet module statistics.

Syntax

In standalone mode:

display ethernet statistics slot slot-number

In IRF mode:

display ethernet statistics chassis chassis-number slot slot-number

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies a card by its slot number. (In standalone mode.)

chassis chassis-number slot slot-number: Specifies a card on an IRF member device. The chassis-number argument represents the member ID of the IRF member device. The slot-number argument represents the slot number of the card. (In IRF mode.)  

Examples

# (In standalone mode.) Display the Ethernet module statistics for the specified slot.

<Sysname> display ethernet statistics slot 1

ETH receive packet statistics:

    Totalnum        : 10447          ETHIINum     : 4459

    SNAPNum         : 0              RAWNum       : 0

    LLCNum          : 0              UnknownNum   : 0

    ForwardNum      : 4459           ARP          : 0

    MPLS            : 0              ISIS         : 0

    ISIS2           : 0              IP           : 0

    IPV6            : 0

ETH receive error statistics:

    NullPoint       : 0              ErrIfindex   : 0

    ErrIfcb         : 0              IfShut       : 0

    ErrAnalyse      : 5988           ErrSrcMAC    : 5988

    ErrHdrLen       : 0

 

ETH send packet statistics:

    L3OutNum        : 211            VLANOutNum   : 0

    FastOutNum      : 155            L2OutNum     : 0

ETH send error statistics:

    MbufRelayNum    : 0              NullMbuf     : 0

    ErrAdjFwd       : 0              ErrPrepend   : 0

    ErrHdrLen       : 0              ErrPad       : 0

    ErrQoSTrs       : 0              ErrVLANTrs   : 0

    ErrEncap        : 0              ErrTagVLAN   : 0

    IfShut          : 0              IfErr        : 0

Table 3 Output description

Field

Description

ETH receive packet statistics

Statistics about the Ethernet packets received by the Ethernet module:

·     Totalnum—Total number of received packets.

·     ETHIINum—Number of packets encapsulated by using Ethernet II.

·     SNAPNum—Number of packets encapsulated by using SNAP.

·     RAWNum—Number of packets encapsulated by using RAW.

·     ISISNum—Number of packets encapsulated by using ISIS.

·     LLCNum—Number of packets encapsulated by using LLC.

·     UnknownNum—Number of packets encapsulated by using unknown methods.

·     ForwardNum—Number of packets forwarded at Layer 2 or sent to the CPU.

·     ARP—Number of ARP packets.

·     MPLS—Number of MPLS packets.

·     ISIS—Number of IS-IS packets.

·     ISIS2—Number of large 802.3/802.2 frames encapsulated by using IS-IS.

·     IP—Number of IP packets.

·     IPv6—Number of IPv6 packets.

ETH receive error statistics

Statistics about the error Ethernet packets in the inbound direction on the Ethernet module. Errors might be included in packets or occur during the receiving process. The items include:

·     NullPoint—Number of packets that include null pointers.

·     ErrIfindex—Number of packets that include incorrect interface indexes.

·     ErrIfcb—Number of packets that include incorrect interface control blocks.

·     IfShut—Number of packets that are being received when the interface is shut down.

·     ErrAnalyse—Number of packets that include packet parsing errors.

·     ErrSrcMAC—Number of packets that include incorrect source MAC addresses.

·     ErrHdrLen—Number of packets that include header length errors.

ETH send packet statistics

Statistics about the Ethernet packets sent by the Ethernet module:

·     L3OutNum—Number of packets sent out of Layer 3 Ethernet interfaces.

·     VLANOutNum—Number of packets sent out of VLAN interfaces.

·     FastOutNum—Number of packets fast forwarded.

·     L2OutNum—Number of packets sent out of Layer 2 Ethernet interfaces.

·     MbufRelayNum—Number of packets transparently sent.

ETH send error statistics

Statistics about the error Ethernet packets in the outbound direction on the Ethernet module:

·     NullMbuf—Number of packets with null pointers.

·     ErrAdjFwd—Number of packets with adjacency table errors.

·     ErrPrepend—Number of packets with extension errors.

·     ErrHdrLen—Number of packets with header length errors.

·     ErrPad—Number of packets with padding errors.

·     ErrQoSTrs—Number of packets that failed to be sent by QoS.

·     ErrVLANTrs—Number of packets that failed to be sent in VLANs.

·     ErrEncap—Number of packets that failed to be sent due to link header encapsulation failures.

·     ErrTagVLAN—Number of packets that failed to be sent due to VLAN tag encapsulation failures.

·     IfShut—Number of packets that are being sent when the interface is shut down.

·     IfErr—Number of packets with incorrect outgoing interfaces.

Related commands

reset ethernet statistics

display interface

Use display interface to display interface information.

Syntax

display interface [ interface-type [ interface-number | interface-number.subnumber ] ] [ brief [ description | down ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number.

interface-number.subnumber: Specifies a subinterface number. The interface-number argument is an interface number. The subnumber argument is the number of a subinterface created under the interface. The value range for the subnumber argument is 1 to 4094.

brief: Displays brief interface information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays detailed interface information.

description: Displays complete interface descriptions. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays only the first 27 characters of each interface description.

down: Displays information about interfaces in down state and the causes. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays information about interfaces in all states.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify an interface type, this command displays information about all interfaces.

If you specify an interface type but do not specify an interface number, this command displays information about all interfaces of the specified type.

Examples

# Display information about Layer 3 interface HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> display interface hundredgige 1/0/1

HundredGigE1/0/1

Current state: Administratively DOWN

Line protocol state: DOWN

Description: HundredGigE1/0/1 Interface

Bandwidth: 1000000 kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1500

Allow jumbo frames to pass

Broadcast max-ratio: 100%

Unknown-multicast max-ratio: 100%

Unicast max-ratio: 100%

Internet protocol processing: Disabled

IP packet frame type: Ethernet II, hardware address: 3822-d666-bd0c

IPv6 packet frame type: Ethernet II, hardware address: 3822-d666-bd0c

Loopback is not set

Media type is not sure, port hardware type is No connector

Ethernet port mode: LAN

Port priority: 2

Unknown-speed mode, unknown-duplex mode

Link speed type is autonegotiation, link duplex type is autonegotiation

Flow-control is not enabled

The maximum frame length is 9416

Last link flapping: 6 hours 39 minutes 28 seconds

Last clearing of counters: Never

Current system time:2018-08-10 14:56:12

Last time when physical state changed to up:-

Last time when physical state changed to down:2018-08-10 14:55:25

 Peak input rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 2013-07-07 16:07:11

 Peak output rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 2013-07-07 16:07:11

 Last 300 seconds input:  0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec  0%

 Last 300 seconds output: 0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec  0%

 Input  (total): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, - pauses

 Input  (normal): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input: 0 input errors, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

          0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overruns, - aborts

          - ignored, - parity errors

 Output  (total): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, - pauses

 Output  (normal): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output: 0 output errors, - underruns, - buffer failures

          0 aborts, 0 deferred, 0 collisions, 0 late collisions

          - lost carrier, - no carrier

IPv4 traffic statistics:

 Last 0 seconds input rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Last 0 seconds output rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes

 Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes

IPv6 traffic statistics:

 Last 0 seconds input rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Last 0 seconds output rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes

 Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes

# Display detailed information about Layer 2 interface HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> display interface hundredgige 1/0/1

HundredGigE1/0/1

Current state: DOWN

Line protocol state: DOWN

IP packet frame type: Ethernet II, hardware address: 000c-2963-b767

Description: HundredGigE1/0/1 Interface

Bandwidth: 100000 kbps

Loopback is not set

Media type is not sure, port hardware type is No connector

Ethernet port mode: LAN

Unknown-speed mode, unknown-duplex mode

Link speed type is autonegotiation, link duplex type is autonegotiation

Flow-control is not enabled

Maximum frame length: 9416

Allow jumbo frame to pass

Broadcast max-ratio: 100%

Unknown-multicast max-ratio: 100%

Unicast max-ratio: 100%

PVID: 1

MDI type: Automdix

Port link-type: Access

 Tagged VLANs:   None

 UnTagged VLANs: 1

Port priority: 2

Last link flapping: 6 hours 39 minutes 25 seconds

Last clearing of counters:  14:34:09 Tue 11/01/2011

Current system time:2018-08-10 14:58:27

Last time when physical state changed to up:-

Last time when physical state changed to down:2018-08-10 14:57:58

 Peak input rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 2013-07-17 22:06:19

 Peak output rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 2013-07-17 22:06:19

 Last 300 seconds input:  0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec -%

 Last 300 seconds output:  0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec -%

 Input (total):  0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input (normal):  0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input:  0 input errors, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

          0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overruns, 0 aborts

          0 ignored, 0 parity errors

 Output (total): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output (normal): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output: 0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 buffer failures

          0 aborts, 0 deferred, 0 collisions, 0 late collisions

          0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier

IPv4 traffic statistics:

 Last 0 seconds input rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Last 0 seconds output rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes

 Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes

IPv6 traffic statistics:

 Last 0 seconds input rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Last 0 seconds output rate: 0 packets/sec, 0 bytes/sec

 Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes

 Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes

Table 4 Command output

Field

Description

Current state

Physical link state of the interface:

·     Administratively DOWN—The interface has been shut down by using the shutdown command.

·     DOWN—The interface is administratively up, but its physical state is down (possibly because no physical link exists or the link has failed).

·     DOWN ( Link-Aggregation interface down )—The aggregate interface to which the interface belongs has been shut down by using the shutdown command.

·     DOWN (Monitor-Link uplink down )—The interface has been shut down by Monitor Link.

·     Link-Flap DOWN—The interface has been shut down by the link flapping protection feature.

·     mac-address moving down—The interface has been shut down by the MAC address move suppression feature.

·     OFP DOWN—The interface has been shut down by OpenFlow.

·     Storm-Constrain—The interface has been shut down because the storm control feature detected that unknown unicast traffic, multicast traffic, or broadcast traffic exceeded the upper threshold.

·     STP DOWN—The interface has been shut down by the BPDU guard feature.

·     UP—The interface is both administratively and physically up.

Line protocol state

Data link layer state of the interface. The state is determined through automatic parameter negotiation at the data link layer.

·     UP—The data link layer protocol is up.

·     UP (spoofing)—The data link layer protocol is up, but the link is an on-demand link or does not exist. This attribute is typical of null interfaces and loopback interfaces.

·     DOWN—The data link layer protocol is down.

·     DOWN (protocols)—The data link layer has been shut down by protocols included in the parentheses. Available protocols include:

¡     DLDP—Shuts down the data link layer when it detects that the link is unidirectional.

¡     OAM—Shuts down the data link layer when it detects a remote link failure.

¡     LAGG—Shuts down the data link layer when it detects that the aggregate interface does not have Selected ports.

¡     BFD—Shuts down the data link layer when it detects a link failure.

Bandwidth

Expected bandwidth of the interface.

Maximum transmission unit

MTU of the interface.

Internet protocol processing: Disabled

The interface is not assigned an IP address and cannot process IP packets.

Internet address

IP address of the interface. The primary attribute indicates that the address is the primary IP address.

IP packet frame type

IPv4 packet framing format.

hardware address

MAC address of the interface.

FEC mode

FEC mode of the interface, which depends on the configuration.

When the FEC mode of an interface is set to autonegotiation, the actual FEC mode depends on the model of the transceiver module installed in the fiber port.

IPv6 packet frame type

IPv6 packet framing format.

Port priority

Port priority of the interface.

Loopback is set internal

An internal loopback test is running on the interface. This field depends on your configuration.

Loopback is set external

An external loopback test is running on the interface. This field depends on your configuration.

Loopback is not set

No loopback test is running on the interface. This field depends on your configuration.

10Gbps-speed mode

The interface is operating at 10 Gbps. This field depends on your configuration and the link parameter negotiation result.

25Gbps-speed mode

The interface is operating at 25 Gbps. This field depends on your configuration and the link parameter negotiation result.

40Gbps-speed mode

The interface is operating at 40 Gbps. This field depends on your configuration and the link parameter negotiation result.

100Gbps-speed mode

The interface is operating at 100 Gbps. This field depends on your configuration and the link parameter negotiation result.

Unknown-speed mode

The speed of the interface is unknown because the speed negotiation fails or the interface is physically disconnected.

full-duplex mode

The interface is operating in full duplex mode. This field depends on your configuration and the link parameter negotiation result.

unknown-duplex mode

The duplex mode of the interface is unknown because the duplex mode negotiation fails or the interface is physically disconnected.

Link speed type is autonegotiation

The interface is configured with the speed auto command.

Link speed type is force link

The interface is manually configured with a speed (for example, 1000 Mbps) by using the speed command.

link duplex type is autonegotiation

The interface is configured with the duplex auto command.

link duplex type is force link

The interface is manually configured with a duplex mode (for example, half or full) by using the duplex command.

Flow-control is not enabled

Generic flow control is disabled on the interface. This field depends on your configuration and the link parameter negotiation result.

Maximum frame length

Maximum length of Ethernet frames allowed to pass through the interface.

Allow jumbo frame to pass

The interface allows jumbo frames to pass through.

Broadcast max-

Broadcast storm suppression threshold in ratio, pps, or kbps. The unit of the threshold depends on your configuration.

Unknown-multicast max-

Multicast storm suppression threshold in ratio, pps, or kbps. The unit of the threshold depends on your configuration.

Unicast max-

Unknown unicast storm suppression threshold in ratio, pps, or kbps. The unit of the threshold depends on your configuration.

PVID

Port VLAN ID (PVID) of the interface.

MDI type

MDIX mode of the interface:

·     automdix.

·     mdi.

·     mdix.

Port link-type

Link type of the interface:

·     access.

·     trunk.

·     hybrid.

Tagged VLANs

VLANs for which the interface sends packets without removing VLAN tags.

Untagged VLANs

VLANs for which the interface sends packets after removing VLAN tags.

VLAN Passing

VLANs whose packets can be forwarded by the port. The VLANs must have been created.

VLAN permitted

VLANs whose packets are permitted by the port.

Trunk port encapsulation

Encapsulation protocol type for the trunk port.

Last link flapping

The amount of time that has elapsed since the most recent physical state change of the interface. This field displays Never if the interface has been physically down since device startup.

Last clearing of counters

Time when the reset counters interface command was last used to clear the interface statistics. This field displays Never if the reset counters interface command has never been used on the interface since device startup.

Current system time

Current system time in the YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS format. If the time zone is configured, this field is in the YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS zone-name±HH:MM:SS format, where the zone-name argument is the local time zone.

Last time when physical state changed to up

Last time when the physical state of the interface changed to up.

If the time zone is configured, this field is in the YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS zone-name±HH:MM:SS format, where the zone-name argument is the local time zone.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the physical state of the interface has never changed.

Last time when physical state changed to down

Last time when the physical state of the interface changed to down.

If the time zone is configured, this field is in the YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS zone-name±HH:MM:SS format, where the zone-name argument is the local time zone.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the physical state of the interface has never changed.

Last 300 seconds input:  0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec 0%

Last 300 seconds output:  0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec 0%

Average inbound or outbound traffic rate (in pps and Bps) in the last 300 seconds, and the ratio of the actual rate to the interface bandwidth.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

Input(total):  0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

The two fields on the first line represent the inbound traffic statistics (in packets and bytes) for the interface. All inbound normal packets, abnormal packets, and normal pause frames were counted.

The four fields on the second line represent:

·     Number of inbound unicast packets.

·     Number of inbound broadcasts.

·     Number of inbound multicasts.

·     Number of inbound pause frames.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

Input(normal):  0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

The two fields on the first line represent the inbound normal traffic and pause frame statistics (in packets and bytes) for the interface.

The four fields on the second line represent:

·     Number of inbound normal unicast packets.

·     Number of inbound normal broadcasts.

·     Number of inbound normal multicasts.

·     Number of inbound normal pause frames.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

input errors

Statistics of incoming error packets.

runts

Number of inbound frames meeting the following conditions:

·     Shorter than 64 bytes.

·     In correct format.

·     Containing valid CRCs.

giants

Number of inbound giants. Giants refer to frames larger than the maximum frame length supported on the interface.

For an Ethernet interface that does not permit jumbo frames, the maximum frame length is as follows:

·     1518 bytes (without VLAN tags).

·     1522 bytes (with VLAN tags).

For an Ethernet interface that permits jumbo frames, the maximum Ethernet frame length is set when you configure jumbo frame support on the interface.

throttles

Number of inbound frames that had a non-integer number of bytes.

CRC

Total number of inbound frames that had a normal length, but contained CRC errors.

frame

Total number of inbound frames that contained CRC errors and a non-integer number of bytes.

overruns

Number of packets dropped because the input rate of the port exceeded the queuing capability.

aborts

Total number of illegal inbound packets:

·     Fragment frames—CRC error frames shorter than 64 bytes. The length (in bytes) can be an integral or non-integral value.

·     Jabber frames—CRC error frames greater than the maximum frame length supported on the Ethernet interface (with an integral or non-integral length).

¡     For an Ethernet interface that does not permit jumbo frames, the maximum frame length is 1518 bytes (without VLAN tags) or 1522 bytes (with VLAN tags).

¡     For an Ethernet interface that permits jumbo frames, the maximum Ethernet frame length is set when you configure jumbo frame support on the interface.

·     Symbol error frames—Frames that contained a minimum of one undefined symbol.

·     Unknown operation code frames—Non-pause MAC control frames.

·     Length error frames—Frames whose 802.3 length fields did not match the actual frame length (46 to 1500 bytes).

ignored

Number of inbound frames dropped because the receiving buffer of the port ran low.

parity errors

Total number of frames with parity errors.

Output(total): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

The two fields on the first line represent the outbound traffic statistics (in packets and bytes) for the interface. All outbound normal packets, abnormal packets, and normal pause frames were counted.

The four fields on the second line represent:

·     Number of outbound unicast packets.

·     Number of outbound broadcasts.

·     Number of outbound multicasts.

·     Number of outbound pause frames.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

Output(normal): 0 packets, 0 bytes

          0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

The two fields on the first line represent the outbound normal traffic and pause frame statistics (in packets and bytes) for the interface.

The four fields on the second line represent:

·     Number of outbound normal unicast packets.

·     Number of outbound normal broadcasts.

·     Number of outbound normal multicasts.

·     Number of outbound normal pause frames.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

output errors

Number of outbound packets with errors.

underruns

Number of packets dropped because the output rate of the interface exceeded the output queuing capability. This is a low-probability hardware anomaly.

buffer failures

Number of packets dropped because the transmitting buffer of the interface ran low.

aborts

Number of packets that failed to be transmitted, for example, because of Ethernet collisions.

deferred

Number of frames that the interface deferred to transmit because of detected collisions.

collisions

Number of frames that the interface stopped transmitting because Ethernet collisions were detected during transmission.

late collisions

Number of frames that the interface deferred to transmit after transmitting their first 512 bits because of detected collisions.

lost carrier

Number of carrier losses during transmission. This counter increases by one when a carrier is lost, and applies to serial WAN interfaces.

no carrier

Number of times that the port failed to detect the carrier when attempting to send frames. This counter increases by one when a port failed to detect the carrier, and applies to serial WAN interfaces.

Peak input rate

Peak rate of inbound traffic in Bps, and the time when the peak inbound traffic rate occurred.

Peak output rate

Peak rate of outbound traffic in Bps, and the time when the peak outbound traffic rate occurred.

IPv4 traffic statistics

IPv4 packet statistics.

IPv6 traffic statistics

IPv6 packet statistics.

Last 300 seconds input rate: 300 packets/sec, 230000 bytes/sec

Average inbound traffic rate (in pps and Bps) in the last 300 seconds.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

Last 300 seconds output rate: 200 packets/sec, 220000 bytes/sec

Average outbound traffic rate (in pps and Bps) in the last 300 seconds.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

Input: 12 packets, 1968 bytes

Inbound traffic statistics (in packets and bytes) for the interface.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes

Outbound traffic statistics (in packets and bytes) for the interface.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the statistical item is not supported.

# Display brief information about all interfaces.

<Sysname> display interface brief

Brief information on interfaces in route mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Protocol: (s) – spoofing

 

Interface            Link Protocol Primary IP      Description

HGE1/0/1             DOWN DOWN     --

Loop0                UP   UP(s)    2.2.2.9

NULL0                UP   UP(s)    --

Vlan1                UP   DOWN     --

Vlan999              UP   UP       192.168.1.42

 

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Speed: (a) - auto

Duplex: (a)/A - auto; H - half; F - full

Type: A - access; T - trunk; H - hybrid

Interface            Link Speed   Duplex Type PVID Description

HGE1/0/2             DOWN auto    A      A    1

HGE1/0/3             UP   auto    F(a)   A    1    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

# Display brief information about HundredGigE 1/0/3, including the complete description of the interface.

<Sysname> display interface hundredgige 1/0/3 brief description

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Speed: (a) - auto

Duplex: (a)/A - auto; H - half; F - full

Type: A - access; T - trunk; H - hybrid

Interface            Link Speed   Duplex Type PVID Description

HGE1/0/3             UP   auto    F(a)   A    1    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

# Display information about interfaces in DOWN state and the causes.

<Sysname> display interface brief down

Brief information on interfaces in route mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Interface            Link Cause

HGE1/0/1             DOWN Not connected

Vlan2                DOWN Not connected

 

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Interface            Link Cause

HGE1/0/2             DOWN Not connected

Table 5 Command output

Field

Description

Brief information on interfaces in route mode:

Brief information about Layer 3 interfaces.

Interface

Interface name.

Link

Physical link state of the interface:

·     UP—The interface is physically up.

·     DOWN—The interface is physically down.

·     ADM—The interface has been shut down by using the shutdown command. To restore the physical state of the interface, use the undo shutdown command.

·     Stby—The interface is a backup interface in standby state.

Protocol

Data link layer protocol state of the interface:

·     UP—The data link layer protocol of the interface is up.

·     DOWN—The data link layer protocol of the interface is down.

·     UP(s)—The data link layer protocol of the interface is up, but the link is an on-demand link or does not exist. The (s) attribute represents the spoofing flag. This value is typical of null interfaces and loopback interfaces.

Primary IP

Primary IP address of the interface. This field displays two hyphens (--) if the interface does not have an IP address.

Description

Description of the interface.

Brief information of interfaces in bridge mode:

Brief information about Layer 2 interfaces.

Type: A - access; T - trunk; H – hybrid

Link type options for interfaces.

Speed

Speed of the interface, in bps.

This field displays the (a) flag next to the speed if the speed is automatically negotiated.

This field displays auto if the interface is configured to autonegotiate its speed but the autonegotiation has not started.

Duplex

Duplex mode of the interface:

·     A—Autonegotiation. The interface is configured to autonegotiate its duplex mode but the autonegotiation has not started.

·     F—Full duplex.

·     F(a)—Autonegotiated full duplex.

·     H—Half duplex.

·     H(a)—Autonegotiated half duplex.

Type

Link type of the interface:

·     A—Access.

·     H—Hybrid.

·     T—Trunk.

PVID

Port VLAN ID.

Cause

Cause for the physical link state of an interface to be DOWN:

·     Administratively—The interface has been manually shut down by using the shutdown command. To restore the physical state of the interface, use the undo shutdown command.

·     DOWN ( Link-Aggregation interface down )—The interface is a member port of an aggregate interface, and the aggregate interface is down.

·     DOWN (Loopback detection down)—The loopback detection module has detected loops.

·     DOWN ( Monitor-Link uplink down )—The monitor link module has detected that the uplink is down.

·     Not connected—No physical connection exists (possibly because the network cable is disconnected or faulty).

·     Storm-Constrain—The storm control feature has detected that unknown unicast traffic, multicast traffic, or broadcast traffic exceeded the upper threshold.

·     STP DOWN—The interface has been shut down by the BPDU guard feature.

·     OFP DOWN—The interface has been shut down by OpenFlow.

Related commands

reset counters interface

display interface split-capable

Use display interface split-capable to display interfaces capable of being split.

Syntax

display interface split-capable [ slot slot-number ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies a card by its slot number. If you do not specify a card, this command displays interfaces capable of being split for all cards.

Examples

# Display interfaces capable of being split.

<Sysname> display interface split-capable

slot 7:

100-GE interfaces capable of being split into multiple 10-GE or 25-GE interfaces:

 HundredGigE5/0/1       HundredGigE5/0/2       HundredGigE5/0/3

 HundredGigE5/0/4       HundredGigE5/0/5       HundredGigE5/0/7

 HundredGigE5/0/8       HundredGigE5/0/9       HundredGigE5/0/10

 HundredGigE5/0/11      HundredGigE5/0/12      HundredGigE5/0/13

 HundredGigE5/0/14      HundredGigE5/0/15      HundredGigE5/0/16

 HundredGigE5/0/17      HundredGigE5/0/18      HundredGigE5/0/19

 HundredGigE5/0/20      HundredGigE5/0/21      HundredGigE5/0/22

 HundredGigE5/0/23      HundredGigE5/0/24      HundredGigE5/0/25

 HundredGigE5/0/26      HundredGigE5/0/27      HundredGigE5/0/28

 HundredGigE5/0/29      HundredGigE5/0/30      HundredGigE5/0/31

 HundredGigE5/0/32      HundredGigE5/0/33      HundredGigE5/0/34

 HundredGigE5/0/35      HundredGigE5/0/36

40-GE interfaces capable of being split into four 10-GE interfaces:

display interface link-info

Use display interface link-info to display the status and packet statistics of interfaces.

Syntax

display interface link-info [ main ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

main: Specifies all interfaces except subinterfaces. If you do not specify this keyword, this command displays status and packet statistics of all interfaces.

Examples

# Display status and statistics of all interfaces.

<Sysname> display interface link-info

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Protocol: (s) - spoofing

Interface        Link Protocol  InUsage OutUsage         InErrs        OutErrs

HGE1/0/1         UP   UP            10%       0%              0              0

NULL0            UP   UP(s)          0%       0%              0              0

 

 Overflow: More than 7 digits.

       --: Not supported.

Table 6 Command output

Field

Description

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Physical link state of the interface:

·     ADM—The interface has been shut down by using the shutdown command. To restore the physical state of the interface, use the undo shutdown command.

·     Stby—The interface is a backup interface in standby state. To see the primary interface, use the display interface-backup state command.

Protocol: (s) – spoofing

The data link layer protocol of the interface is up, but the link is an on-demand link or does not exist. The (s) attribute represents the spoofing flag. This value is typical of null interfaces, loopback interfaces, and InLoopback interfaces.

Interface

Abbreviated interface name.

Link

Physical link state of the interface:

·     UP—The interface is physically up.

·     DOWN—The interface is physically down.

·     ADM—The interface has been shut down by using the shutdown command. To restore the physical state of the interface, use the undo shutdown command.

·     Stby—The interface is a backup interface in standby state.

Protocol

Data link layer protocol state of the interface:

·     UP—The data link layer protocol of the interface is up.

·     DOWN—The data link layer protocol of the interface is down.

·     UP(s)—The data link layer protocol of the interface is up, but the link is an on-demand link or does not exist. The (s) attribute represents the spoofing flag. This value is typical of null interfaces, loopback interfaces, and InLoopback interfaces.

InUsage

Inbound bandwidth usage within the most recent statistics polling interval. It is calculated by this formula: Average inbound speed of the interface within the most recent statistics polling interval/interface bandwidth. To set the statistics polling interval, use the flow-interval command.

OutUsage

Outbound bandwidth usage within the most recent statistics polling interval. It is calculated by this formula: Average outbound speed of the interface within the most recent statistics polling interval/interface bandwidth. To set the statistics polling interval, use the flow-interval command.

InErrs

Number of error packets received.

OutErrs

Number of error packets sent.

Overflow: More than 7 digits.

The data length of a statistical item value is greater than 7 decimal digits.

--: Not supported.

A hyphen (-) indicates that the corresponding statistical item is not supported.

 

Related commands

flow-interval

display interface main

Use display interface main to display operating status and information of all interfaces except subinterfaces.

Syntax

display interface [ interface-type ] [ brief [ description | down ] ] main

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type. If you do not specify this argument, the command displays information about interfaces of all types.

brief: Displays brief interface information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays detailed interface information.

description: Displays complete interface descriptions. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays only the first 27 characters of each interface description.

down: Displays information about interfaces in down state and the causes. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays information about interfaces in all states.

Examples

# Display operating status and information of all interfaces except subinterfaces.

<Sysname> display interface main

HundredGigE1/0/1

Current state: Administratively DOWN

Line protocol state: DOWN

IP packet frame type: Ethernet II, hardware address: 4005-6538-0100

Description: HundredGigE1/0/1 Interface

Bandwidth: 1000000 kbps

Loopback is not set

Unknown-speed mode, unknown-duplex mode

Link speed type is autonegotiation, link duplex type is autonegotiation

Flow-control is not enabled

Maximum frame length: 9216

Allow jumbo frames to pass

Broadcast max-ratio: 100%

Multicast max-ratio: 100%

Unicast max-ratio: 100%

PVID: 1

MDI type: Automdix

Port link-type: Access

 Tagged VLANs:   None

 Untagged VLANs: 1

Port priority: 2

Last link flapping: Never

Last clearing of counters: Never

Current system time:2018-04-11 10:20:24

Last time when physical state changed to up:-

Last time when physical state changed to down:2018-04-11 09:11:09

 Peak input rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 00-00-00 00:00:00

 Peak output rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 00-00-00 00:00:00

 Last 300 seconds input: 0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec -%

 Last 300 seconds output: 0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec -%

 Input (total):  0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input (normal):  0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input:  0 input errors, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

         0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overruns, 0 aborts

         0 ignored, 0 parity errors

 Output (total): 0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output (normal): 0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output: 0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 buffer failures

         0 aborts, 0 deferred, 0 collisions, 0 late collisions

         0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier

 

HundredGigE1/0/2

Current state: Administratively DOWN

Line protocol state: DOWN

Description: HundredGigE1/0/2 Interface

Bandwidth: 1000000 kbps

Flow-control is not enabled

Maximum transmission unit: 1500

Allow jumbo frames to pass

Broadcast max-ratio: 100%

Multicast max-ratio: 100%

Unicast max-ratio: 100%

Internet protocol processing: Disabled

IP packet frame type: Ethernet II, hardware address: 4005-6538-0107

IPv6 packet frame type: Ethernet II, hardware address: 4005-6538-0107

Output queue - Urgent queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/100/0

Output queue - Protocol queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/500/0

Output queue - FIFO queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/75/0

Last link flapping: Never

Last clearing of counters: Never

Current system time:2018-04-11 10:20:24

Last time when physical state changed to up:-

Last time when physical state changed to down:2018-04-11 09:33:52

 Peak input rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 00-00-00 00:00:00

 Peak output rate: 0 bytes/sec, at 00-00-00 00:00:00

 Last 300 seconds input: 0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec -%

 Last 300 seconds output: 0 packets/sec 0 bytes/sec -%

 Input (total):  0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input (normal):  0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Input:  0 input errors, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

         0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overruns, 0 aborts

         0 ignored, 0 parity errors

 Output (total): 0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output (normal): 0 packets, 0 bytes

         0 unicasts, 0 broadcasts, 0 multicasts, 0 pauses

 Output: 0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 buffer failures

         0 aborts, 0 deferred, 0 collisions, 0 late collisions

         0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier

# Display brief information of all interfaces except subinterfaces.

<Sysname> display interface brief main

Brief information on interfaces in route mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Protocol: (s) – spoofing

 

Interface            Link Protocol Primary IP      Description

HGE1/0/1             DOWN DOWN     --

Loop0                UP   UP(s)    2.2.2.9

NULL0                UP   UP(s)    --

Vlan1                UP   DOWN     --

Vlan999              UP   UP       192.168.1.42

 

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Speed: (a) - auto

Duplex: (a)/A - auto; H - half; F - full

Type: A - access; T - trunk; H - hybrid

Interface            Link Speed   Duplex Type PVID Description

HGE1/0/2             DOWN auto    A      A    1

# Display brief information about all interfaces, including the complete interface descriptions.

<Sysname> display interface  brief description main

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Speed: (a) - auto

Duplex: (a)/A - auto; H - half; F - full

Type: A - access; T - trunk; H - hybrid

Interface            Link Speed   Duplex Type PVID Description

HGE1/0/3             UP   auto    F(a)   A    1    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

# Display information about interfaces in DOWN state and the causes.

<Sysname> display interface brief down main

Brief information on interfaces in route mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Interface            Link Cause

HGE1/0/1             DOWN Not connected

Vlan2                DOWN Not connected

 

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Interface            Link Cause

HGE1/0/2             DOWN Not connected

For description on the display interface main command output, see Table 4 and Table 5.

display link-flap protection

Use display link-flap protection to display information about link flapping protection on an interface.

Syntax

display link-flap protection [ interface interface-type [ interface-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type. If you do not specify an interface type, the command displays information about link flapping protection on all interfaces.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number. If you do not specify an interface number, the command displays information about link flapping protection on all interfaces of the specified type.

Examples

# Display information about link flapping protection on all interfaces.

<Sysname> display link-flap protection

Link-flap protection: Enabled

Interface            Link-flap  Status  Interval  Threshold

HGE1/0/1             Enabled    Down    10        5

HGE1/0/2             Disabled   N/A     --        --

 

Table 7 Command output

Field

Description

Link-flap protection

Status of global link flapping protection:

·     Enabled—Link flapping protection is enabled globally.

·     Disabled—Link flapping protection is disabled globally.

Link-flap

Status of link flapping protection on an interface:

·     Enabled—Link flapping protection is enabled on an interface.

·     Disabled—Link flapping protection is disabled on an interface.

Status

Status of an interface:

·     Down—The interface has been shut down by the link flapping protection feature.

·     N/A—The interface status is not affected by the link flapping protection feature.

Interval

Link flapping detection interval for an interface.

Threshold

Link flapping detection threshold for an interface.

Related commands

link-flap protect enable

port link-flap protect enable

display packet-drop

Use display packet-drop to display information about packets dropped on an interface.

Syntax

display packet-drop { interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ] | summary }

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number.

summary: Displays the summary of dropped packets on only interfaces that support this command.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify an interface type, this command displays information about dropped packets on only interfaces that support this command on the device.

If you specify an interface type but do not specify an interface number, this command displays information about dropped packets on only interfaces of the specified type that support this command.

Examples

# Display information about dropped packets on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> display packet-drop interface hundredgige 1/0/1

HundredGigE1/0/1:

  Packets dropped due to Fast Filter Processor (FFP): 261

  Packets dropped due to Egress Filter Processor (EFP): 0

  Packets dropped due to STP non-forwarding state: 0

  Packets dropped due to insufficient data buffer. Input dropped: 0 Output dropped:0

  Packets of ECN marked: 0

  Packets of WRED dropped: 0

# Display the summary of dropped packets on only interfaces that support this command.

<Sysname> display packet-drop summary

All interfaces:

  Packets dropped due to Fast Filter Processor (FFP): 261

  Packets dropped due to Egress Filter Processor (EFP): 0

  Packets dropped due to STP non-forwarding state: 0

  Packets dropped due to insufficient data buffer. Input dropped: 0 Output dropped:0

  Packets of ECN marked: 0

  Packets of WRED dropped: 0

Table 8 Command output

Field

Description

Packets dropped due to Fast Filter Processor (FFP)

Packets that are dropped due to FFP in the inbound direction.

Packets dropped due to Egress Filter Processor (EFP)

Packets that are dropped due to EFP in the outbound direction.

Packets dropped due to STP non-forwarding state

Packets that are dropped because STP is in the non-forwarding state.

Packets dropped due to insufficient data buffer. Input dropped: 0 Output dropped:0

Inbound and outbound packets that are dropped due to insufficient data buffer.

Packets of ECN marked

Packets with the ECN field set to 11 because WRED queue thresholds are reached. For more information about WRED and ECN, see ACL and QoS Configuration Guide.

Packets of WRED dropped

Packets that are dropped because the WRED queue thresholds are reached.

display priority-flow-control

Use display priority-flow-control to display the PFC information for an interface.

Syntax

display priority-flow-control interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type. If you do not specify an interface type, the command displays the PFC information for all Ethernet interfaces.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number. If you do not specify an interface number, the command displays the PFC information for all Ethernet interfaces of the specified type.

Examples

# Display the PFC information for all Ethernet interfaces.

<Sysname> display priority-flow-control interface

Conf -- Configured mode   Ne -- Negotiated mode   P -- Priority

Interface     Conf Ne  Dot1pList   P Recv       Sent       Inpps      Outpps

HGE1/0/1      Auto On  0,2-3,5-6   0 178        43         12         15

Table 9  Command output

Field

Description

Conf -- Configured mode

Locally configured PFC status.

Ne -- Negotiated mode

Negotiated PFC status.

P -- Priority

802.1p priority value for which PFC is enabled.

Interface

Abbreviated name of the interface.

Conf

Locally configured PFC status:

·     Auto—The interface is configured to autonegotiate the PFC status with the remote end.

·     Off—PFC is disabled for the interface.

·     On—PFC is enabled for the interface.

Ne

Negotiated PFC status:

·     Off—PFC is disabled.

·     On—PFC is enabled.

Dot1pList

802.1p priorities that are enabled with PFC. 802.1p priority values 0 through 7 are available.

P

An 802.1p priority is displayed only when the 802.1p priority is enabled with PFC and the interface has received or sent packets with the 802.1p priority.

Recv

Number of received PFC pause frames.

Sent

Number of sent PFC pause frames.

Inpps

Incoming PFC frame rate in pps for the 802.1p priority.

Outpps

Outgoing PFC frame rate in pps for the 802.1p priority.

Related commands

priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

duplex

Use duplex to set the duplex mode for an Ethernet interface.

Use undo duplex to restore the default.

Syntax

duplex { auto | full }

undo duplex

Default

Ethernet interfaces operate in autonegotiation mode.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

auto: Configures the interface to autonegotiate the duplex mode with the peer.

full: Configures the interface to operate in full duplex mode. In this mode, the interface can receive and transmit packets simultaneously.

Examples

# Configure HundredGigE 1/0/1 to operate in full duplex mode.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] duplex full

flow-control

Use flow-control to enable TxRx-mode generic flow control on an Ethernet interface.

Use undo flow-control to disable TxRx-mode generic flow control on the Ethernet interface.

Syntax

flow-control

undo flow-control

Default

TxRx-mode generic flow control is disabled on an Ethernet interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

With TxRx-mode generic flow control configured, an interface can both send and receive flow control frames:

·     When congested, the interface sends a flow control frame to its peer.

·     Upon receiving a flow control frame from the peer, the interface suspends sending packets.

To implement flow control on a link, enable generic flow control at both ends of the link.

Examples

# Enable TxRx-mode generic flow control on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] flow-control

flow-control receive enable

Use flow-control receive enable to enable Rx-mode generic flow control on an Ethernet port.

Use undo flow-control to disable Rx-mode generic flow control on an Ethernet port.

Syntax

flow-control receive enable

undo flow-control

Default

Rx-mode generic flow control is disabled on Ethernet interfaces.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

With Rx-mode flow control enabled, an interface can receive but cannot send flow control frames.

·     When the interface receives a flow control frame from its peer, it suspends sending packets to the peer.

·     When traffic congestion occurs on the interface, it cannot send flow control frames to the peer.

To handle unidirectional traffic congestion on a link, configure the flow-control receive enable command at one end, and the flow-control command at the other. To enable both ends of the link to handle traffic congestion, configure the flow-control command at both ends.

This command, the priority-flow-control command, and the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command are mutually exclusive.

Examples

# Enable Rx-mode generic flow control on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-hundredgige 1/0/1] flow-control receive enable

Related commands

flow-control

flow-interval

Use flow-interval to set the statistics polling interval.

Use undo flow-interval to restore the default.

Syntax

flow-interval interval

undo flow-interval

Default

The statistics polling interval is 300 seconds.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

interval: Sets the statistics polling interval in seconds. The interval is in the range of 5 to 300 and must be a multiple of 5.

Examples

# Set the statistics polling interval to 100 seconds on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] flow-interval 100

interface

Use interface to enter interface view, create a subinterface and enter its view, or enter the view of an existing subinterface.

Syntax

interface interface-type { interface-number | interface-number.subnumber }

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number.

interface-number.subnumber: Specifies a subinterface number. The interface-number argument is an interface number. The subnumber argument is the number of a subinterface created under the interface. The value range for the subnumber argument is 1 to 4094.

Examples

# Enter the view of HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1]

# Create Ethernet subinterface HundredGigE 1/0/1.1 and enter its view.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1.1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1]

jumboframe enable

Use jumboframe enable to allow jumbo frames within the specified length to pass through.

Use undo jumboframe enable to prevent jumbo frames from passing through.

Use undo jumboframe enable size to restore the default.

Syntax

jumboframe enable [ size ]

undo jumboframe enable [ size ]

Default

The device allows jumbo frames within 9416 bytes to pass through.

Views

Layer 2 Ethernet interface view

Layer 3 Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

size: Sets the maximum length (in bytes) of Ethernet frames that are allowed to pass through. The value range for this argument is 1536 to 9416.

Usage guidelines

If you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Allow jumbo frames to pass through HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] jumboframe enable

link-delay

Use link-delay to set the physical state change suppression interval on an Ethernet interface.

Use undo link-delay to restore the default.

Syntax

link-delay { down | up } [ msec ] delay-time

undo link-delay { down | up }

Default

Each time the physical link of a port goes up or comes down, the interface immediately reports the change to the CPU.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

down: Suppresses link-down events.

up: Suppresses link-up events.

msec: Enables the physical state change suppression interval to be accurate to milliseconds. If you do not specify this keyword, the suppression interval is accurate to seconds.

delay-time: Sets the physical state change suppression interval on the Ethernet interface. A value of 0 means that physical state changes are immediately reported to the CPU and are not suppressed.

·     If you do not specify the msec keyword, the value range is 0 to 30 seconds.

·     If you specify the msec keyword, the value range is 0 to 10000 milliseconds, and the value must be a multiple of 100.

Usage guidelines

You can configure this feature to suppress only link-down events, only link-up events, or both. If an event of the specified type still exists when the suppression interval expires, the system reports the event.

When you configure this feature, follow these guidelines:

·     To suppress link-down events, configure the link-delay down command.

·     To suppress link-up events, configure the link-delay up command.

On an interface, you can configure different suppression intervals for link-up and link-down events. If you execute the link-delay command multiple times on an interface, the following rules apply:

·     You can configure the suppression intervals for link-up and link-down events separately.

·     If you configure the suppression interval multiple times for link-up or link-down events, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Do not configure this command on an interface that has RRPP, spanning tree protocols, or Smart Link enabled.

This command, the dampening command, and the port link-flap protect enable command are mutually exclusive on an Ethernet interface.

Examples

# Set the link-down event suppression interval to 8 seconds on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] link-delay down 8

# Set the link-up event suppression interval to 800 milliseconds on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] link-delay up msec 800

Related commands

dampening

port link-flap protect enable

link-flap protect enable

Use link-flap protect enable to enable link flapping protection globally.

Use undo link-flap protect enable to disable link flapping protection globally.

Syntax

link-flap protect enable

undo link-flap protect enable

Default

Link flapping protection is disabled globally.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

Link flapping on any interface changes network topology and increases the system overhead. For example, in an active/standby link scenario, when the interface status on the active link changes between UP and DOWN, traffic switches between active and standby links. To solve this problem, execute this command.

With link flapping protection enabled on an interface, when the interface goes down, the system enables link flapping detection on the interface. During the link flapping detection interval, if the number of detected flaps reaches or exceeds the link flapping detection threshold, the system shuts down the interface.

Link flapping protection takes effect only when it is enabled in both system view and interface view.

Examples

# Enable link flapping protection globally.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] link-flap protect enable

Related commands

port link-flap protect enable

loopback

Use loopback to enable loopback testing on an Ethernet interface.

Syntax

loopback internal

Default

Loopback testing is disabled on an Ethernet interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

internal: Enables internal loopback testing on the Ethernet interface.

Usage guidelines

After you enable loopback testing on an Ethernet interface, the Ethernet interface switches to full duplex mode. After you disable loopback testing, the Ethernet interface restores to its duplex setting.

An Ethernet interface in a loopback test cannot correctly forward data packets.

You cannot perform a loopback test on the following Ethernet interfaces:

·     Ethernet interfaces manually brought down (displayed as in ADM or Administratively DOWN state).

·     Ethernet interfaces configured with the port up-mode command.

The speed, duplex, and shutdown commands cannot be configured on an Ethernet interface in a loopback test.

Examples

# Enable internal loopback testing on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] loopback internal

multicast-suppression

Use multicast-suppression to enable multicast storm suppression and set the multicast storm suppression threshold.

Use undo multicast-suppression to disable multicast storm suppression.

Syntax

multicast-suppression { ratio | pps max-pps | kbps max-kbps }

undo multicast-suppression

Default

Ethernet interfaces do not suppress multicast traffic.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

ratio: Sets the multicast suppression threshold as a percentage of the interface bandwidth. The value range for this argument (in percentage) is 0 to 100. A smaller value means that less multicast traffic is allowed to pass through.

pps max-pps: Specifies the maximum number of multicast packets that the interface can forward per second. The value range for the max-pps argument (in pps) is 0 to 1.4881 × the interface bandwidth.

kbps max-kbps: Specifies the maximum number of kilobits of multicast traffic that the Ethernet interface can forward per second. The value range for this argument (in kbps) is 0 to the interface bandwidth.

Usage guidelines

The multicast storm suppression feature limits the size of multicast traffic to a threshold on an interface. When the multicast traffic on the interface exceeds this threshold, the system drops packets until the traffic drops below this threshold.

Both the storm-constrain command and the multicast-suppression command can suppress multicast storms on a port. The multicast-suppression command uses the chip to physically suppress multicast traffic. It has less influence on the device performance than the storm-constrain command, which uses software to suppress multicast traffic.

For the traffic suppression result to be determined, do not configure both the storm-constrain multicast command and the multicast-suppression command on an interface.

When you configure the suppression threshold in kbps, the actual suppression threshold might be different from the configured one as follows:

·     If the configured value is smaller than 64, the value of 64 takes effect.

·     If the configured value is greater than 64 but not an integer multiple of 64, the integer multiple of 64 that is greater than and closest to the configured value takes effect.

To determine the suppression threshold that takes effect, see the prompts on the switch.

Set the same type of thresholds for each interface.

Examples

# Set the multicast storm suppression threshold to 10000 kbps on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] multicast-suppression kbps 10000

The actual value is 10048 on port HundredGigE1/0/1 currently.

The output shows that the value that takes effect is 10048 kbps (157 times of 64), because the chip only supports step 64.

Related commands

broadcast-suppression

unicast-suppression

port fec mode

Use port fec mode to set the forward error correction (FEC) mode of an interface.

Use undo port fec mode to restore the default.

Syntax

port fec mode { auto | base-r | none | rs-fec }

undo port fec mode

Default

The FEC mode of an interface is autonegotiation.

Views

25-GE interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

auto: Specifies the FEC autonegotiation mode.

base-r: Specifies the BASE-R FEC mode.

none: Performs no FEC.

rs-fec: Specifies the RS-FEC mode.

Usage guidelines

The FEC feature corrects packet errors to improve transmission quality. It attaches correction information to a packet at the sending end, and corrects error codes generated during transmission at the receiving end based on the correction information. You can set the FEC mode as needed.

Make sure you set the same FEC mode for both interfaces of a link.

Examples

# Set the FEC mode of Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1 to autonegotiation.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface twenty-fivegige 1/0/1

[Sysname-Twenty-FiveGigE1/0/1] port fec mode auto

 

 

port ifmonitor crc-error

Use port ifmonitor crc-error to configure CRC error packet alarm parameters for an interface.

Use undo port ifmonitor crc-error to restore the default.

Syntax

port ifmonitor crc-error [ ratio ] high-threshold high-value low-threshold low-value interval interval [ shutdown ]

undo port ifmonitor crc-error

Default

The upper threshold is 1000, the lower threshold is 100, and the statistics collection and comparison interval is 10 seconds.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

ratio: Specifies the alarm thresholds in percentage. If you do not specify this keyword, you configure the alarm thresholds in absolute value.

high-threshold high-value: Specifies the upper threshold for CRC error packet alarms. If you specify the ratio keyword, the value range is 1 to 100. If you do not specify the ratio keyword, the value range is 1 to 4294967295 packets.

low-threshold low-value: Specifies the lower threshold for CRC error packet alarms. If you specify the ratio keyword, the value range is 1 to 100. If you do not specify the ratio keyword, the value range is 1 to 4294967295 packets.

interval interval: Specifies the statistics collection and comparison interval for CRC error packets, in the range of 1 to 65535 seconds.

shutdown: Shuts down an interface when the number of incoming CRC error packets on the interface exceeds the upper threshold. Then, the interface stops forwarding all packets. To recover the interface, execute the undo shutdown command on the interface. If you do not specify this keyword, an upper threshold exceeding alarm is generated and the interface enters the alarm state when the number of incoming CRC error packets exceeds the upper threshold on the interface.

Usage guidelines

With the CRC error packet alarm function enabled, when the number of incoming CRC error packets on an interface in normal state within the specified interval exceeds the upper threshold, the interface generates an upper threshold exceeding alarm and enters the alarm state. When the number of incoming CRC error packets on an interface in the alarm state within the specified interval drops below the lower threshold, the interface generates a recovery alarm and restores to the normal state.

When you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the upper threshold to 5000, lower threshold to 400, and statistics collection and comparison interval to 6 seconds for CRC error packet alarms on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1

[Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port ifmonitor crc-error high-threshold 5000 low-threshold 400 interval 6

Related commands

snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor

port ifmonitor input-error

Use port ifmonitor input-error to configure input error packet alarm parameters for an interface.

Use undo port ifmonitor input-error to restore the default.

Syntax

port ifmonitor input-error high-threshold high-value low-threshold low-value interval interval [ shutdown ]

undo port ifmonitor input-error

Default

The upper threshold is 1000, the lower threshold is 100, and the statistics collection and comparison interval is 10 seconds.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

high-threshold high-value: Specifies the upper threshold for input error packet alarms, in the range of 1 to 4294967295 packets.

low-threshold low-value: Specifies the lower threshold for input error packet alarms, in the range of 1 to 4294967295 packets.

interval interval: Specifies the statistics collection and comparison interval for input error packets, in the range of 1 to 65535 seconds.

shutdown: Shuts down an interface when the number of input error packets on the interface exceeds the upper threshold. Then, the interface stops forwarding all packets. To recover the interface, execute the undo shutdown command on the interface. If you do not specify this keyword, an upper threshold exceeding alarm is generated and the interface enters the alarm state when the number of input error packets exceeds the upper threshold on the interface.

Usage guidelines

With the input error packet alarm function enabled, when the number of input error packets on an interface in normal state within the specified interval exceeds the upper threshold, the interface generates an upper threshold exceeding alarm and enters the alarm state. When the number of input error packets on an interface in the alarm state within the specified interval drops below the lower threshold, the interface generates a recovery alarm and restores to the normal state.

When you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the upper threshold to 5000, lower threshold to 400, and statistics collection and comparison interval to 6 seconds for input error packet alarms on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1

[Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port ifmonitor input-error high-threshold 5000 low-threshold 400 interval 6

Related commands

snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor

port ifmonitor output-error

Use port ifmonitor output-error to configure output error packet alarm parameters for an interface.

Use undo port ifmonitor output-error to restore the default.

Syntax

port ifmonitor output-error high-threshold high-value low-threshold low-value interval interval [ shutdown ]

undo port ifmonitor output-error

Default

The upper threshold is 1000, the lower threshold is 100, and the statistics collection and comparison interval is 10 seconds.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

high-threshold high-value: Specifies the upper threshold for output error packet alarms, in the range of 1 to 4294967295 packets.

low-threshold low-value: Specifies the lower threshold for output error packet alarms, in the range of 1 to 4294967295 packets.

interval interval: Specifies the statistics collection and comparison interval for output error packets, in the range of 1 to 65535 seconds.

shutdown: Shuts down an interface when the number of output error packets on the interface exceeds the upper threshold. Then, the interface stops forwarding all packets. To recover the interface, execute the undo shutdown command on the interface. If you do not specify this keyword, an upper threshold exceeding alarm is generated and the interface enters the alarm state when the number of output error packets exceeds the upper threshold on the interface.

Usage guidelines

With the output error packet alarm function enabled, when the number of output error packets on an interface in normal state within the specified interval exceeds the upper threshold, the interface generates an upper threshold exceeding alarm and enters the alarm state. When the number of output error packets on an interface in the alarm state within the specified interval drops below the lower threshold, the interface generates a recovery alarm and restores to the normal state.

When you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the upper threshold to 5000, lower threshold to 400, and statistics collection and comparison interval to 6 seconds for output error packet alarms on GigabitEthernet 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/1

[Sysname-GigabitEthernet1/0/1] port ifmonitor output-error high-threshold 5000 low-threshold 400 interval 6

Related commands

snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor

port link-flap protect enable

Use port link-flap protect enable to enable link flapping protection on an interface.

Use undo port link-flap protect enable to disable link flapping protection on an interface.

Syntax

port link-flap protect enable [ interval interval | threshold threshold ] *

undo port link-flap protect enable [ interval | threshold ]

Default

Link flapping protection is disabled on an interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

interval: Specifies the link flapping detection interval in seconds. The value range for this argument is 10 to 60. The default value for this argument is 10.

threshold: Specifies the link flapping detection threshold in the range of 5 to 10. The default value for this argument is 5.

Usage guidelines

Link flapping protection takes effect only when it is enabled in both system view and interface view.

If you do not specify the interval interval or threshold threshold option when you execute the port link-flap protect enable command, the command uses the default settings.

If you specify the interval or threshold keyword when you execute the undo port link-flap protect enable command, the command restores the default setting for the keyword.

With link flapping protection enabled on an interface, when the interface goes down, the system enables link flapping detection on the interface. During the link flapping detection interval, if the number of detected flaps reaches or exceeds the link flapping detection threshold, the system shuts down the interface.

To bring up an interface that has been shut down by link flapping protection, execute the undo shutdown command.

This command, the dampening command, and the link-delay command are mutually exclusive on an Ethernet interface.

Examples

# Enable link flapping protection on an interface. Set the link flapping detection interval to 10 seconds, and set the link flapping detection threshold to 5.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE 1/0/1] port link-flap protect enable interval 10 threshold 5

Related commands

dampening

link-delay

link-flap protect enable

port link-mode

Use port link-mode to change the link mode of an Ethernet interface.

Use undo port link-mode to restore the default.

Syntax

port link-mode { bridge | route }

undo port link-mode

Default

Interfaces operate in bridge mode.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

bridge: Specifies the Layer 2 mode.

route: Specifies the Layer 3 mode.

Usage guidelines

Interfaces on the device can operate either as Layer 2 or Layer 3 Ethernet interfaces.

You can use commands to set the link mode to bridge or route.

Changing the link mode of an Ethernet interface also restores all commands (except speed, shutdown) on the Ethernet interface to their defaults in the new link mode.

Examples

# Configure HundredGigE 1/0/1 to operate in Layer 2 mode.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] port link-mode bridge

port training

Use port training to configure link compensation on an interface.

Use undo port training to restore the default.

Syntax

port training { disable | enable }

undo port training

Default

Link compensation is disabled on an interface.

Views

25-GE interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

disable: Disables link compensation.

enable: Enables link compensation.

Usage guidelines

Link compensation enables the sending and receiving ends to exchange pre-emphasis and equalization parameters through frames. This feature improves the performance of pre-emphasis and equalization.

Only 25-GE Ethernet interfaces connected through copper cables support this command. For 25-GE interfaces connected through copper cables to operate properly, you must enable link compensation.

You must enable or disable link compensation on both interfaces of a link.

Typically, the link compensation status is controlled by the software, and do not adjust the link compensation status as a best practice. Use this command to adjust the link compensation status only when the interface cannot come up.

Examples

# Enable link compensation on Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface twenty-fivegige 1/0/1

[Sysname-Twenty-FiveGigE1/0/1] port training enable

port up-mode

Use port up-mode to forcibly bring up a fiber Ethernet port.

Use undo port up-mode to restore the default.

Syntax

port up-mode

undo port up-mode

Default

A fiber Ethernet port is not forcibly brought up. The physical state of a fiber port depends on the physical state of the fibers.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

This command forcibly brings up a fiber Ethernet port and enables the port to forward packets unidirectionally over a single link. In this way, transmission links are well utilized.

The following operations on a fiber port will cause link updown events before the port finally stays up:

·     Configure both the port up-mode command and the speed or duplex command.

·     Install or remove fiber links or transceiver modules after you forcibly bring up the fiber port.

The shutdown and port up-mode commands are mutually exclusive.

A fiber Ethernet port does not support this command if the port is shut down by a protocol or by using the shutdown command.

A fiber Ethernet port does not support this command if the port joins an aggregation group.

Examples

# Forcibly bring up fiber port HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] port up-mode

priority-flow-control (Ethernet interface view)

Use priority-flow-control to enable PFC on an Ethernet interface.

Use undo priority-flow-control to disable PFC on an Ethernet interface.

Syntax

priority-flow-control enable

undo priority-flow-control

Default

PFC is disabled on an Ethernet interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

enable: Forcibly enables PFC.

Usage guidelines

The local device notifies the remote end to stop sending packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority if all of the following conditions exist:

·     Both the local end and the remote end have PFC enabled.

·     Both the local end and the remote end have the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command configured.

·     The specified 802.1p priority is in the 802.1p priority list specified by the dot1p-list argument.

·     The local end receives packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority, and the received packets cause congestion.

When congestion is eliminated, the local end notifies the remote end to continue to send packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority. In this way, the local device can forward packets carrying 802.1p priorities in the specified 802.1p priority list without packet drops.

If you execute this command in system view and Ethernet interface view multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Enable PFC on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control enable

Related commands

display priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control (system view)

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control (system view)

Use priority-flow-control to enable PFC on all Ethernet interfaces.

Use undo priority-flow-control to disable PFC on all Ethernet interfaces.

Syntax

priority-flow-control enable

undo priority-flow-control

Default

PFC is disabled on Ethernet interfaces.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

enable: Forcibly enables PFC.

Usage guidelines

The local device notifies the remote end to stop sending packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority if all of the following conditions exist:

·     Both the local end and the remote end have PFC enabled.

·     Both the local end and the remote end have the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command configured.

·     The specified 802.1p priority is in the 802.1p priority list specified by the dot1p-list argument.

·     The local end receives packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority, and the received packets cause congestion.

When congestion is eliminated, the local end notifies the remote end to continue to send packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority. In this way, the local device can forward packets carrying 802.1p priorities in the specified 802.1p priority list without packet drops.

If you execute this command in system view and Ethernet interface view multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Enable PFC on all Ethernet interfaces.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control enable

Related commands

display priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control (Ethernet interface view)

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action

Use priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action to configure the action to take on packets during the delay timer period for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action { discard | forwarding }

undo priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action

Default

The device forwards received data packets during the delay timer period for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

discard: Drops the received data packets.

forwarding: Forwards the received data packets.

Usage guidelines

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

Examples

# Configure the device to drop received data packets during the delay timer period for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover action discard

Related commands

priority-flow-control deadlock cos

priority-flow-control deadlock enable

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover cos

Use priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover cos to configure the delay timer for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover cos to delete the delay timer for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery.

Syntax

In standalone mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover slot slot-number cos cos-value delay delay-time

undo priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover slot slot-number cos [ cos-value ]

In IRF mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cos cos-value delay delay-time

undo priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cos [ cos-value ]

Default

The delay timer for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery is not configured.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

cos cos-value: Specifies the CoS value of packets, in the range of 0 to 7. Different CoS values correspond to different 802.1p priority values. To see the CoS-to-802.1p mapping, execute the display qos map-table dot1p-lp command.

delay delay-time: Specifies the delay timer for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery in the range of 1 to 15.

slot slot-number: Specifies a card by its slot number. (In standalone mode.)

chassis chassis-number slot slot-number: Specifies a card on an IRF member device. The chassis-number argument represents the member ID of the IRF member device. The slot-number argument represents the slot number of the card. (In IRF mode.)  

Usage guidelines

PFC deadlock detection periodically detects whether deadlock occurs to packets carrying the specified CoS value. If the device enters the PFC deadlock state and PFC deadlock detection is recovered in automatic mode, the device automatically recovers PFC deadlock detection after the delay timer expires. The delay timer is determined by this command and the PFC deadlock detection timer precision.

This command takes effect only in automatic recovery mode. This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

The specified CoS value must be within the 802.1p priority values configured by using the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command.

You can set the same delay timer for different CoS values.

If you execute this command multiple times for the same CoS value, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the delay timer for PFC deadlock detection automatic recovery to 5 for packets carrying CoS value 7.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control deadlock auto-recover cos 7 delay 5

Related commands

display qos map-table dot1p-lp (ACL and QoS Command Reference)

priority-flow-control deadlock precision

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control deadlock cos

Use priority-flow-control deadlock cos to set the PFC deadlock detection interval for the specified CoS value.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock cos to delete the PFC deadlock detection interval for the specified CoS value or all CoS values.

Syntax

In standalone mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock slot slot-number cos cos-value interval interval

undo priority-flow-control deadlock slot slot-number cos [ cos-value ]

In IRF mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cos cos-value interval interval

undo priority-flow-control deadlock chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cos [ cos-value ]

 Default

The PFC deadlock detection interval for a CoS value is not set.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

cos cos-value: Specifies the CoS value of packets, in the range of 0 to 7.

interval interval: Specifies the PFC deadlock detection interval in the range of 1 to 15.

chassis chassis-number slot slot-number: Specifies a card on an IRF member device. The chassis-number argument represents the member ID of the IRF member device. The slot-number argument represents the slot number of the card. (In IRF mode.)

Usage guidelines

The PFC deadlock detection feature periodically detects whether deadlock occurs to packets that carry the specified CoS value. To obtain the length of time for the detection interval, multiply the detection interval by the precision of the PFC deadlock detection timer.

The specified CoS value must be within the 802.1p priority list specified by using the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command. To view the 802.1p priority for each CoS value, execute the display qos map-table dot1p-lp command.

You can set the same detection interval for different CoS values.

If you execute this command for the same CoS value multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

Examples

# (In standalone mode.) Set the PFC deadlock detection interval to 5 for packets carrying CoS value 7 on slot 1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control deadlock slot 1 cos 7 interval 5

Related commands

display qos map-table dot1p-lp (ACL and QoS Command Reference)

priority-flow-control deadlock precision

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control deadlock enable

Use priority-flow-control deadlock enable to enable PFC deadlock detection on an interface.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock enable to disable PFC deadlock detection on an interface.

Syntax

priority-flow-control deadlock enable

undo priority-flow-control deadlock enable

Default

PFC deadlock detection is disabled on an interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

The device enters the PFC deadlock state if the following conditions exist on an interface:

·     PFC for 802.1p priorities is enabled by using the priority-flow-control and priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p commands.

·     Packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority are transmitted in a loop.

·     No packets in the data buffer can be forwarded.

This command enables periodically detecting whether the device is in PFC deadlock state.

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

Examples

# Enable PFC deadlock detection on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control deadlock enable

Related commands

priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control deadlock cos

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control deadlock precision

Use priority-flow-control deadlock precision to set the precision for the PFC deadlock detection timer.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock precision to restore the default.

Syntax

In standalone mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock slot slot-number precision { high | low | normal }

undo priority-flow-control deadlock slot slot-number precision

In IRF mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock chassis chassis-number slot slot-number precision { high | low | normal }

undo priority-flow-control deadlock chassis chassis-number slot slot-number precision

 Default

The PFC deadlock detection timer uses normal precision.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

high: Specifies the high precision for the PFC deadlock detection timer.

low: Specifies the low precision for the PFC deadlock detection timer. This keyword is not supported in the current software version.

normal: Specifies the normal precision for the PFC deadlock detection timer.

chassis chassis-number slot slot-number: Specifies a card on an IRF member device. The chassis-number argument represents the member ID of the IRF member device. The slot-number argument represents the slot number of the card. (In IRF mode.)

Usage guidelines

Use this command to adjust the precision for the PFC deadlock detection timer and change the PFC deadlock detection interval. For the PFC deadlock detection timer of the device, the high precision represents 10 ms and the normal precision represents 100 ms.

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

If you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# (In standalone mode.) Set the high precision for the PFC deadlock detection timer on slot 1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control deadlock slot 1 precision high

priority-flow-control deadlock recover

Use priority-flow-control deadlock recover to recover PFC deadlock detection on an interface.

Syntax

priority-flow-control deadlock recover

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

Before executing this command, you must use the priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode command to set the recovery mode for PFC deadlock detection.

The device can automatically release the deadlock state, but both the PFC deadlock detection and PFC features are disabled on the interface at the same time. To manually recover PFC deadlock detection on the interface, execute this command after setting the manual recovery mode for PFC deadlock detection on the interface. The PFC feature is also enabled again when you execute this command.

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

Examples

# Recover PFC deadlock detection on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control deadlock recover

Related commands

priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode

priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode

Use priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode to set the recovery mode for PFC deadlock detection on an interface.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode { auto | manual }

undo priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode

Default

PFC deadlock detection recovers in automatic mode on an interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

auto: Specifies the automatic recovery mode.

manual: Specifies the manual recovery mode.

Usage guidelines

When the PFC deadlock state is detected and PFC deadlock detection is recovered in automatic mode, the device automatically releases the deadlock state and recovers PFC and PFC deadlock detection after the delay timer expires. Within the delay timer period, the device disables PFC and PFC deadlock detection on the interface, so that packets can be forwarded properly. PFC deadlock detection can be recovered in automatic or manual mode on the interface. Recovering this feature enables the PFC feature again at the same time. Use the automatic recovery mode when no serious failures occur.

When a packet loop cannot be resolved and the device enters the PFC deadlock state frequently, manually recover PFC deadlock detection on the interface as follows:

1.     Perform troubleshooting and set the manual recovery mode for PFC deadlock detection.

2.     Execute the priority-flow-control deadlock recover command to recover the PFC deadlock detection and PFC features.

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

Examples

# Set the manual recovery mode for PFC deadlock detection on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control deadlock recover-mode manual

Related commands

priority-flow-control deadlock recover

priority-flow-control deadlock threshold

Use priority-flow-control deadlock threshold to configure the upper threshold for PFC deadlock times within the specified period.

Use undo priority-flow-control deadlock threshold to restore the default.

Syntax

In standalone mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock threshold slot slot-number cos cos-value period period count count

undo priority-flow-control deadlock threshold slot slot-number cos [ cos-value ]

In IRF mode:

priority-flow-control deadlock threshold chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cos cos-value period period count count

undo priority-flow-control deadlock threshold chassis chassis-number slot slot-number cos [ cos-value ]

Default

The upper threshold for PFC deadlock times within the specified period is not configured.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

cos cos-value: Specifies the CoS value of packets, in the range of 0 to 7. Different CoS values correspond to different 802.1p priority values. To see the CoS-to-802.1p mapping, execute the display qos map-table dot1p-lp command.

period period: Specifies the period for detecting PFC deadlock times, in the range of 1 to 60 seconds.

count count: Specifies the upper threshold for PFC deadlock times within the specified period, in the range of 1 to 500.

slot slot-number: Specifies a card by its slot number. (In standalone mode.)

chassis chassis-number slot slot-number: Specifies a card on an IRF member device. The chassis-number argument represents the member ID of the IRF member device. The slot-number argument represents the slot number of the card. (In IRF mode.)  

Usage guidelines

With this command configured, when the PFC deadlock times within the specified period exceed the upper threshold on an interface, the device disables PFC for the corresponding 802.1p priority on the interface. To recover the PFC feature on the interface in this case, execute the undo priority-flow-control deadlock threshold command.

The detection period specified in this command must be longer than the PFC deadlock detection interval configured by using the priority-flow-control deadlock cos command, so that you can determine whether the device frequently enters the PFC deadlock state.

This command is not supported on devices in PFC deadlock state.

The specified CoS value must be within the 802.1p priority values configured by using the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command.

You can set the same detection period for different CoS values.

If you execute this command multiple times for the same CoS value, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the upper threshold for PFC deadlock times to 100 within the period of 5 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control deadlock threshold cos 7 period 5 count 100

Related commands

priority-flow-control deadlock cos

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control dot1p headroom

Use priority-flow-control dot1p headroom to set the headroom buffer threshold.

Use undo priority-flow-control dot1p headroom to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p headroom headroom-number

undo priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p headroom

Default

The headroom buffer threshold is 8192.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p: Specifies an 802.1p priority in the range of 0 to 7.

headroom-number: Specifies the headroom buffer threshold in the range of 1 to 131072.

Usage guidelines

Before executing this command, you must use the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command to enable PFC for the specified 802.1p priority.

If you execute this command multiple times for the same 802.1p priority, the most recent configuration takes effect.

When two directly connected interfaces transmit data, the buffers of interfaces are used for buffering received data. A longer transmission distances needs a large buffer size. You can use this command to set the headroom buffer threshold to implement zero packet loss.

·     For a 100-GE interface:

¡     When the transmission distance is 300 meters, you only need to execute the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command on the interface. This command automatically sets the default headroom buffer threshold, which is adequate for implementing zero packet loss for the transmission distance.

¡     When the transmission distance is 10000 meters, you must use the priority-flow-control dot1p headroom command on the interface to set the headroom buffer threshold. As a best practice, set the headroom buffer threshold to 9984. You can adjust the threshold as needed to ensure zero packet loss for the transmission distance.

¡     When the transmission distance is longer than 10000 meters, the device series does not support transceiver modules with the transmission distance in the current software version.

·     For a non-100-GE interface:

¡     When the transmission distance is 300, 10000, or 20000 meters, you only need to execute the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command on the interface. This command automatically sets the default headroom buffer threshold, which is adequate for implementing zero packet loss for the transmission distance.

¡     When the transmission distance is 40000 meters, you must use the priority-flow-control dot1p headroom command on the interface to set the headroom buffer threshold. As a best practice, set the headroom buffer threshold to 9984. You can adjust the threshold as needed to ensure zero packet loss for the transmission distance.

Examples

# Set the headroom buffer threshold to 1000 for 802.1p priority 1 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control dot1p 1 headroom 1000

Related commands

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer dynamic

Use priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer dynamic to set the dynamic back pressure frame triggering threshold.

Use undo priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p ingress-buffer dynamic ratio

undo priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p ingress-buffer

Default

No dynamic back pressure frame triggering thresholds are set.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p: Specifies an 802.1p priority in the range of 0 to 7.

ratio: Specifies the dynamic back pressure frame triggering threshold in percentage. The value range for this argument is 1 to 100.

Usage guidelines

Before executing this command, you must use the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command to enable PFC for the specified 802.1p priority.

If you execute this command multiple times for the same 802.1p priority, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the dynamic back pressure frame triggering threshold to 30 for 802.1p priority 1 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control dot1p 1 ingress-buffer dynamic 30

Related commands

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer static

Use priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer static to set the static back pressure frame triggering threshold.

Use undo priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-buffer to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p ingress-buffer static threshold

undo priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p ingress-buffer

Default

The static back pressure frame triggering threshold is 512.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p-list: Specifies an 802.1p priority in the range of 0 to 7.

threshold: Specifies the static back pressure frame triggering threshold in the range of 1 to 131072.

Usage guidelines

Before executing this command, you must use the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command to enable PFC for the specified 802.1p priority.

If you execute this command for the same 802.1p priority multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the static back pressure frame triggering threshold to 1000 for 802.1p priority 1 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control dot1p 1 ingress-buffer static 1000

Related commands

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-threshold-offset

Use priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-threshold-offset to set the offset between the back pressure frame stopping threshold and triggering threshold.

Use undo priority-flow-control dot1p ingress-threshold-offset to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p ingress-threshold-offset offset-number

undo priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p ingress-threshold-offset

Default

The offset between the back pressure frame stopping threshold and triggering threshold is 48.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p: Specifies an 802.1p priority in the range of 0 to 7.

offset-number: Specifies the offset between the back pressure frame stopping threshold and triggering threshold in the range of 1 to 131072.

Usage guidelines

Before executing this command, you must use the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command to enable PFC for the specified 802.1p priority.

If you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the offset between the back pressure frame stopping threshold and triggering threshold to 1000 for 802.1p priority 1 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control dot1p 1 ingress-threshold-offset 1000

Related commands

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control dot1p reserved-buffer

Use priority-flow-control dot1p reserved-buffer to set the PFC reserved threshold.

Use undo priority-flow-control dot1p reserved-buffer to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p reserved-buffer reserved-number

undo priority-flow-control dot1p dot1p reserved-buffer

Default

The PFC reserved threshold is 6.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p: Specifies an 802.1p priority in the range of 0 to 7.

reserved-number: Specifies the PFC reserved threshold in the range of 1 to 131072.

Usage guidelines

Before executing this command, you must use the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command to enable PFC for the specified 802.1p priority.

If you execute this command multiple times for the same 802.1p priority, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the PFC reserved threshold to 1000 for 802.1p priority 1 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control dot1p 1 reserved-buffer 1000

Related commands

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

priority-flow-control early-warning inpps

Use priority-flow-control early-warning inpps to configure the early warning threshold for incoming PFC packets.

Use undo priority-flow-control early-warning inpps to delete the early warning threshold for incoming PFC packets.

Syntax

priority-flow-control early-warning dot1p dot1p-list inpps pps-value

undo priority-flow-control early-warning [ dot1p dot1p-list ] inpps

Default

No early warning threshold is configured for incoming PFC packets.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p-list: Specifies an 802.1p priority (or dot1p priority) list to identify flows that are subject to PFC (for example: 1,3-5). A hyphen (-) connects two numeric values, which together indicate a continuous value range. Different values or value ranges are separated with commas (,). You can configure up to 16 characters for this argument.

inpps pps-value: Specifies the number of PFC frames that an interface can receive in pps. The value range for this argument is 1 to 159783010.

Usage guidelines

You can configure the early warning threshold for incoming or outgoing PFC packets of an interface as needed. The early warning threshold notifies a situation where the PFC packet transmission rate is still within a normal range but needs attention.

When the rate of PFC packets that an interface sends or receives reaches the early warning threshold, the system generates traps and logs to notify the user. According to the traps and logs, the user can discover some exceptions in the network, for example:

·     The NIC of the peer device fails and continuously sends PFC packets at a high speed. In this case, you can set the early warning threshold for incoming PFC packets.

·     The device fails and continuously sends PFC frames. In this case, you can set the early warning threshold for outgoing PFC packets.

To monitor bidirectional PFC packets, you can set the early warning thresholds for incoming packets and outgoing packets separately.

The number of PFC pause frames that an interface receives is counted and the early warning threshold configuration takes effect only when PFC is enabled.

If you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the early warning threshold to 80 pps for incoming PFC packets with 802.1p priority value 7 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control early-warning dot1p 7 inpps 80

priority-flow-control early-warning outpps

Use priority-flow-control early-warning outpps to configure the early warning threshold for outgoing PFC packets.

Use undo priority-flow-control early-warning outpps to delete the early warning threshold for outgoing PFC packets.

Syntax

priority-flow-control early-warning dot1p dot1p-list outpps pps-value

undo priority-flow-control early-warning [ dot1p dot1p-list ] outpps

Default

No early warning threshold is configured for outgoing PFC packets.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p-list: Specifies an 802.1p priority (or dot1p priority) list to identify flows that are subject to PFC (for example: 1,3-5). A hyphen (-) connects two numeric values, which together indicate a continuous value range. Different values or value ranges are separated with commas (,). You can configure up to 16 characters for this argument.

outpps pps-value: Specifies the number of PFC frames that an interface can send in pps. The value range for this argument is 1 to 159783010.

Usage guidelines

You can configure the early warning threshold for incoming or outgoing PFC packets of an interface as needed. The early warning threshold notifies a situation where the PFC packet transmission rate is still within a normal range but needs attention.

When the rate of PFC packets that an interface sends or receives reaches the early warning threshold, the system generates traps and logs to notify the user. According to the traps and logs, the user can discover some exceptions in the network, for example:

·     The NIC of the peer device fails and continuously sends PFC packets at a high speed. In this case, you can set the early warning threshold for incoming PFC packets.

·     The device fails and continuously sends PFC frames. In this case, you can set the early warning threshold for outgoing PFC packets.

To monitor bidirectional PFC packets, you can set the early warning thresholds for incoming packets and outgoing packets separately.

The number of PFC pause frames that an interface sends is counted and the early warning threshold configuration takes effect only when PFC is enabled.

If you execute this command multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Set the early warning threshold to 50 pps for outgoing PFC packets with 802.1p priority value 1 on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control early-warning dot1p 1 outpps 50

priority-flow-control inner-port enable

Use priority-flow-control inner-port enable to enable PFC on inner interfaces.

Use undo priority-flow-control inner-port enable to disable PFC on inner interfaces.

Syntax

priority-flow-control inner-port enable

undo priority-flow-control inner-port enable

Default

PFC is disabled on inner interfaces.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

An inner interface is the inner Ethernet interface through which a card communicates with the device, and is invisible for users.

With PFC enabled on an inner interface, when the traffic from an LPU to a switching fabric module is congested, the inner interface on the switching fabric module sends PFC pause frames to the inner interface on the LPU to notify the LPU to stop sending packets to the switching fabric module. When congestion is eliminated, the inner interface on the switching fabric module notifies the LPU to continue to send packets to the switching fabric module. This rule also applies to the traffic from a switching fabric module to an LPU.

Examples

# Enable PFC on inner interfaces.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control inner-port enable

Related commands

priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop

priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop

Use priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop to enable PFC for 802.1p priorities on inner interfaces.

Use undo priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop to disable PFC for 802.1p priorities on inner interfaces.

Syntax

priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop dot1p dot1p-list

undo priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop dot1p dot1p-list

Default

PFC is disabled for all 802.1p priorities on inner interfaces.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p-list: Specifies an 802.1p priority (or dot1p priority) list to identify flows that are subject to PFC (for example: 1,3-5). A hyphen (-) connects two numeric values, which together indicate a continuous value range. Different values or value ranges are separated with commas (,). You can configure up to 16 characters for this argument.

Usage guidelines

With PFC enabled and this command configured on inner interfaces, when an inner interface is congested, the inner interface will send PFC pause frames to notify the peer inner interface to stop sending packets carrying the specified 802.1p priorities to prevent these packets from being dropped due to congestion. For more information about 802.1p priorities, see ACL and QoS Configuration Guide.

Examples

# Enable PFC for 802.1p priority 1 on inner interfaces.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control inner-port no-drop dot1p 1

Related commands

priority-flow-control inner-port enable

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p (Ethernet interface view)

Use priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p to enable PFC for 802.1p priorities on an Ethernet interface.

Use undo priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p to disable PFC for 802.1p priorities on an Ethernet interface.

Syntax

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p dot1p-list

undo priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

Default

PFC is disabled for all 802.1p priorities on an Ethernet interface.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p-list: Specifies an 802.1p priority (or dot1p priority) list to identify flows that are subject to PFC (for example: 1,3-5). A hyphen (-) connects two numeric values, which together indicate a continuous value range. Different values or value ranges are separated with commas (,). You can configure up to 16 characters for this argument.

Usage guidelines

The local device notifies the remote end to stop sending packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority if all of the following conditions exist:

·     Both the local end and the remote end have PFC enabled.

·     Both the local end and the remote end have the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command configured.

·     The specified 802.1p priority is in the 802.1p priority list specified by the dot1p-list argument.

·     The local end receives packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority, and the received packets cause congestion.

When congestion is eliminated, the local end notifies the remote end to continue to send packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority. In this way, the local device can forward packets carrying 802.1p priorities in the specified 802.1p priority list without packet drops. For more information about the 802.1p priority, see ACL and QoS Configuration Guide.

This command, the flow-control command, and the flow-control receive enable command are mutually exclusive.

If you execute this command in system view and Ethernet interface view multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Enable PFC in auto mode on HundredGigE 1/0/1, and enable PFC for 802.1p priority 5.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control auto

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p 5

Related commands

display priority-flow-control

flow-control

flow-control receive enable

priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p (system view)

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p (system view)

Use priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p to enable PFC for 802.1p priorities on all Ethernet interfaces.

Use undo priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p to disable PFC for 802.1p priorities on all Ethernet interfaces.

Syntax

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p dot1p-list

undo priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p

Default

PFC is disabled for all 802.1p priorities on all Ethernet interfaces.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dot1p-list: Specifies an 802.1p priority (or dot1p priority) list to identify flows that are subject to PFC (for example: 1,3-5). A hyphen (-) connects two numeric values, which together indicate a continuous value range. Different values or value ranges are separated with commas (,). You can configure up to 16 characters for this argument.

Usage guidelines

The local device notifies the remote end to stop sending packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority if all of the following conditions exist:

·     Both the local end and the remote end have PFC enabled.

·     Both the local end and the remote end have the priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p command configured.

·     The specified 802.1p priority is in the 802.1p priority list specified by the dot1p-list argument.

·     The local end receives packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority, and the received packets cause congestion.

When congestion is eliminated, the local end notifies the remote end to continue to send packets carrying the specified 802.1p priority. In this way, the local device can forward packets carrying 802.1p priorities in the specified 802.1p priority list without packet drops. For more information about the 802.1p priority, see ACL and QoS Configuration Guide.

If you execute this command in system view and Ethernet interface view multiple times, the most recent configuration takes effect.

Examples

# Enable PFC for 802.1p priority 5 globally.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p 5

Related commands

display priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control

priority-flow-control no-drop dot1p (Ethernet interface view)

priority-flow-control poolID headroom

Use priority-flow-control poolID headroom to set the maximum number of cell resources that can be used in a headroom storage space.

Use undo priority-flow-control poolID headroom to restore the default.

Syntax

priority-flow-control poolID pool-number headroom headroom-number

undo priority-flow-control poolID pool-number headroom

Default

The maximum number of cell resources that can be used in a headroom storage space is 12288.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

pool-number: Specifies a headroom storage space by its number in the range of 0 to 3.

headroom-number: Specifies the maximum number of cell resources, in the range of 1 to 131072.

Examples

# Set the headroom buffer threshold to 1000 for headroom storage space 1.

<sysname> system-view

[Sysname] priority-flow-control poolID 1 headroom 1000

reset counters interface

Use reset counters interface to clear the interface statistics.

Syntax

reset counters interface [ interface-type [ interface-number | interface-number.subnumber ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

interface-type: Specifies an interface type.

interface-number: Specifies an interface number.

interface-number.subnumber: Specifies a subinterface number. The interface-number argument is an interface number. The subnumber argument is the number of a subinterface created under the interface. The value range for the subnumber argument is 1 to 4094.

Usage guidelines

Use this command to clear history statistics if you want to collect traffic statistics for a specific time period.

If you do not specify an interface type, this command clears statistics for all interfaces.

If you specify an interface type but do not specify an interface number, this command clears statistics for all interfaces of the specified type.

Examples

# Clear the statistics for HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> reset counters interface hundredgige 1/0/1

Related commands

display counters interface

display counters rate interface

display interface

reset ethernet statistics

Use reset ethernet statistics to clear the Ethernet module statistics.

Syntax

In standalone mode:

reset ethernet statistics [ slot slot-number ]

In IRF mode:

reset ethernet statistics [ chassis chassis-number slot slot-number ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies a card by its slot number. If you do not specify a card, this command clears statistics for all cards. (In standalone mode.)  

chassis chassis-number slot slot-number: Specifies a card on an IRF member device. The chassis-number argument represents the member ID of the IRF member device. The slot-number argument represents the slot number of the card. If you do not specify a card, this command clears statistics for all cards of all IRF member devices. (In IRF mode.)

Examples

# (In standalone mode.) Clear the Ethernet module statistics for the specified slot.

<Sysname> reset ethernet statistics slot 1

Related commands

display ethernet statistics

reset packet-drop interface

Use reset packet-drop interface to clear the dropped packet statistics for an interface.

Syntax

reset packet-drop interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

interface-type: Specify an interface type.

interface-number: Specify an interface number.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify an interface type, this command clears dropped packet statistics for all interfaces on the device.

If you specify an interface type but do not specify an interface number, the command clears dropped packet statistics for all interfaces of the specified type.

Examples

# Clear dropped packet statistics for HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> reset packet-drop interface hundredgige 1/0/1

# Clear dropped packet statistics for all interfaces.

<Sysname> reset packet-drop interface

Related commands

display packet-drop

shutdown

Use shutdown to shut down an Ethernet interface or subinterface.

Use undo shutdown to bring up an Ethernet interface or subinterface.

Syntax

shutdown

undo shutdown

Default

Ethernet interfaces are in down state and Ethernet subinterfaces are in up state.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Ethernet subinterface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

Some interface configurations might require an interface restart before taking effect.

The shutdown and port up-mode commands are mutually exclusive.

The shutdown command cannot be configured on an interface in a loopback test.

Examples

# Shut down and then bring up HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] shutdown

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] undo shutdown

# Shut down and then bring up HundredGigE 1/0/1.1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1.1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1] shutdown

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1] undo shutdown

snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor

Use snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor to enable interface alarm functions.

Use undo snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor to disable interface alarm functions.

Syntax

snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor { crc-error | input-error | output-error } *

undo snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor { crc-error | input-error | output-error } *

Default

Interface alarm functions are enabled.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

crc-error: Enables the CRC error packet alarm function for interfaces.

input-error: Enables the input error packet alarm function for interfaces.

output-error: Enables the output error packet alarm function for interfaces.

Examples

# Enable the CRC error packet alarm function for interfaces.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] snmp-agent trap enable ifmonitor crc-error

speed

Use speed to set the speed of an Ethernet interface.

Use undo speed to restore the default.

Syntax

speed { 10 | 100 | 1000 | 10000 | 25000 | 40000 | 100000 | auto }

undo speed

Default

An Ethernet interface negotiates a speed with its peer.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

10: Sets the interface speed to 10 Mbps.

100: Sets the interface speed to 100 Mbps.

1000: Sets the interface speed to 1000 Mbps.

10000: Sets the interface speed to 10000 Mbps.

25000: Sets the interface speed to 25000 Mbps.

40000: Sets the interface speed to 40000 Mbps.

100000: Sets the interface speed to 100000 Mbps.

auto: Enables the interface to negotiate a speed with its peer.

Usage guidelines

For an Ethernet copper port, use the speed command to set its speed to match the speed of the peer interface.

For a fiber port, use the speed command to set its speed to match the rate of a transceiver module.

Support of an interface for the keywords depends on the interface type. For more information, use the speed ? command in interface view.

Examples

# Configure HundredGigE 1/0/1 to autonegotiate the speed.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] speed auto

unicast-suppression

Use unicast-suppression to enable unknown unicast storm suppression and set the unknown unicast storm suppression threshold.

Use undo unicast-suppression to disable unknown unicast storm suppression.

Syntax

unicast-suppression { ratio | pps max-pps | kbps max-kbps }

undo unicast-suppression

Default

Ethernet interfaces do not suppress unknown unicast traffic.

Views

Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

ratio: Sets the unknown unicast suppression threshold as a percentage of the interface bandwidth. The value range for this argument (in percentage) is 0 to 100. A smaller value means that less unknown unicast traffic is allowed to pass through.

pps max-pps: Specifies the maximum number of unknown unicast packets that the interface can forward per second. The value range for the max-pps argument (in pps) is 0 to 1.4881 × the interface bandwidth.

kbps max-kbps: Specifies the maximum number of kilobits of unknown unicast traffic that the Ethernet interface can forward per second. The value range for this argument (in kbps) is 0 to the interface bandwidth.

Usage guidelines

The unknown unicast storm suppression feature limits the size of unknown unicast traffic to a threshold on an interface. When the unknown unicast traffic on the interface exceeds this threshold, the system discards packets until the unknown unicast traffic drops below this threshold.

Both the storm-constrain command and the unicast-suppression command can suppress unknown unicast storms on a port. The unicast-suppression command uses the chip to physically suppress unknown unicast traffic. It has less influence on the device performance than the storm-constrain command, which uses software to suppress unknown unicast traffic.

For the unknown unicast traffic suppression result to be determined, do not configure both the storm-constrain unicast command and the unicast-suppression command on an interface.

When you configure the suppression threshold in kbps, the actual suppression threshold might be different from the configured one as follows:

·     If the configured value is smaller than 64, the value of 64 takes effect.

·     If the configured value is greater than 64 but not an integer multiple of 64, the integer multiple of 64 that is greater than and closest to the configured value takes effect.

For the suppression threshold that takes effect, see the prompt on the device.

Set the same type of thresholds for each interface.

Examples

# Set the unknown unicast storm suppression threshold to 10000 kbps on HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] unicast-suppression kbps 10000

The actual value is 10048 on port HundredGigE1/0/1 currently.

The output shows that the value that takes effect is 10048 kbps (157 times of 64), because the chip only supports step 64.

Related commands

broadcast-suppression

multicast-suppression

using hundredgige

Use using hundredgige to combine 10-GE or 25-GE breakout interfaces split from a 100-GE interface into a 100-GE interface.

Syntax

using hundredgige

Default

The 10-GE or 25-GE breakout interfaces are not combined and operate as single interfaces.

Views

10-GE breakout interface view

25-GE breakout interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

If you need higher bandwidth on a single interface, perform the following tasks as needed:

·     After a 100-GE interface has a split-capable 40-GE transceiver module or cable installed, you can combine the four 10-GE breakout interfaces into a 100-GE interface. To do so, execute this command on any of these 10-GE breakout interfaces.

·     You can combine four 25-GE breakout interfaces split from a 100-GE interface into a 100-GE interface. To do so, execute this command on any of these 25-GE breakout interfaces.

Device reboot is not required for this command to take effect. You can view the split or combined interface by using the display interface brief command.

When interfaces are being split or combined, you cannot reboot the MPU or perform active/standby MPU switchover.

Examples

# Combine Ten-GigabitEthernet 1/0/1:1 through Ten-GigabitEthernet 1/0/1:4 into an interface.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface ten-gigabitethernet 1/0/1:1

[Sysname-Ten-GigabitEthernet1/0/1:1]using hundredgige

The interfaces Ten-GigabitEthernet1/0/1:1 through Ten-GigabitEthernet1/0/1:10 will be deleted. Continue? [Y/N]:y

# Combine Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1:1 through Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1:4 into a 100-GE interface.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface twenty-fivegige 1/0/1:1

[Sysname-Twenty-FiveGigE1/0/1:1] using hundredgige

The interfaces Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1:1 through Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1:4 will be deleted. Continue? [Y/N]:y

Related commands

using tengige

using twenty-fivegige

using tengige

Use using tengige to split a high bandwidth interface into multiple 10-GE breakout interfaces.

Syntax

using tengige

Default

A high bandwidth interface is not split and operates as a single interface.

Views

100-GE interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

To improve port density, reduce costs, and improve network flexibility, you can split a high bandwidth interface into multiple 10-GE breakout interfaces. For example:

·     The 100-GE interface HundredGigE 1/0/1 with a split-capable 40-GE transceiver module or cable installed can be split into four 10-GE breakout interfaces Ten-GigabitEthernet 1/0/1:1 through Ten-GigabitEthernet 1/0/1:4.

Device reboot is not required for this command to take effect. You can view the split or combined interface by using the display interface brief command.

When interfaces are being split or combined, you cannot reboot the MPU or perform active/standby MPU switchover.

Examples

# Split HundredGigE 1/0/1 into 10-GE breakout interfaces.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] using tengige

The interface HundredGigE1/0/1 will be deleted. Continue? [Y/N]:y

Related commands

using twenty-fivegige

Use using twenty-fivegige to split a 100-GE interface into four 25-GE breakout interfaces.

Syntax

using twenty-fivegige

Default

A 100-GE interface is not split and operates as a single interface.

Views

100-GE interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Usage guidelines

To improve port density, reduce costs, and improve network flexibility, you can split a 100-GE interface into four 25-GE breakout interfaces. For example, you can split the 100-GE interface HundredGigE 1/0/1 into four 25-GE breakout interfaces Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1:1 through Twenty-FiveGigE 1/0/1:4.

Device reboot is not required for this command to take effect. You can view the split or combined interface by using the display interface brief command.

When interfaces are being split or combined, you cannot reboot the MPU or perform active/standby MPU switchover.

Examples

# Split HundredGigE 1/0/1 into four 25-GE breakout interfaces.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] using twenty-fivegige

The interface HundredGigE1/0/1 will be deleted. Continue? [Y/N]:y

Related commands

using hundredgige

Layer 2 Ethernet interface commands

display storm-constrain

Use display storm-constrain to display storm control settings and statistics.

Syntax

display storm-constrain [ broadcast | multicast | unicast ] [ interface interface-type interface-number ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

broadcast: Displays broadcast storm control settings and statistics.

multicast: Displays multicast storm control settings and statistics.

unicast: Displays unknown unicast storm control settings and statistics.

interface interface-type interface-number: Specifies an interface by its type and number. If you do not specify this option, the command displays storm control settings and statistics for all storm control-enabled interfaces.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify any keywords, this command displays all storm control settings on all storm control-enabled interfaces.

Examples

# Display the storm control settings on all storm control-enabled ports.

<Sysname> display storm-constrain

 Abbreviation: BC - broadcast; MC - multicast; UC - unknown unicast;

               FW - forwarding

 Flow Statistic Interval: 5 (in seconds)

Port          Type Lower     Upper     Unit  Mode     Status   Trap Log StateChg

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HGE1/0/1      MC   100       200       kbps  shutdown shutdown off  on  10

Table 10 Command output

Field

Description

Flow Statistic Interval

Traffic polling interval (in seconds) of the storm control module.

Port

Abbreviated interface name.

Type

Type of traffic subjected to storm control:

·     BC—Broadcast packets.

·     MC—Multicast packets.

·     UC—Unknown unicast packets.

·     KNUC—Known unicast packets. This field is not supported in the current software version.

Lower

Lower storm control threshold, in pps, kbps, or percentage.

Upper

Upper storm control threshold, in pps, kbps, or percentage.

Unit

Storm control threshold unit:

·     pps.

·     kbps.

·     percentage.

Mode

Action (block or shutdown) taken on the interface when the upper threshold is reached. N/A indicates that no action is configured.

Status

Packet forwarding status:

·     FW—The port is forwarding traffic correctly.

·     shutdown—The port has been shut down.

·     block—The port drops the type of traffic.

Trap

Status of the storm control threshold event trap switch:

·     on—The port sends threshold event traps.

·     off—The port does not send threshold event traps.

Log

Status of the storm control threshold event log switch:

·     on—The port sends threshold event log messages.

·     off—The port does not send threshold event log messages.

StateChg

Number of forwarding state changes of the interface.

When the StateChg field reaches 65535, it resets automatically.

storm-constrain

Use storm-constrain to enable storm control and set thresholds for broadcast, multicast, or unknown unicast packets on an Ethernet interface.

Use undo storm-constrain to disable storm control for broadcast, multicast, unknown unicast, or all types of traffic.

Syntax

storm-constrain { broadcast | multicast | unicast } { pps | kbps | ratio } upperlimit lowerlimit

undo storm-constrain { all | broadcast | multicast | unicast }

Default

Traffic storm control is disabled.

Views

Layer 2 Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

all: Disables storm control for all types of traffic: broadcast, multicast, and unknown unicast.

broadcast: Enables or disables broadcast storm control.

multicast: Enables or disables multicast storm control.

unicast: Enables or disables unknown unicast storm control.

pps: Sets storm control thresholds in pps.

kbps: Sets storm control thresholds in kbps.

ratio: Sets storm control thresholds as a percentage of the transmission capacity of the interface.

upperlimit: Sets the upper threshold, in pps, kbps, or percentage.

·     If you specify the pps keyword, the value range for the upperlimit argument is 0 to 1.4881 × the interface bandwidth.

·     If you specify the kbps keyword, the value range for the upperlimit argument is 0 to the interface bandwidth.

·     If you specify the ratio keyword, the value range for the upperlimit argument is 0 to 100.

lowerlimit: Sets the lower threshold, in pps, kbps, or percentage.

·     If you specify the pps keyword, the value range for the lowerlimit argument is 0 to 1.4881 × the interface bandwidth.

·     If you specify the kbps keyword, the value range for the lowerlimit argument is 0 to the interface bandwidth.

·     If you specify the ratio keyword, the value range for the lowerlimit argument is 0 to 100.

Usage guidelines

After you configure storm control for a type of traffic, the device collects the statistics for the type of traffic at the interval configured by using the storm-constrain interval command. When the type of traffic exceeds its upper threshold, the interface takes an action configured by using the storm-constrain control command.

The storm-constrain, broadcast-suppression, multicast-suppression, and unicast-suppression commands can suppress storms on an interface. The broadcast-suppression, multicast-suppression, and unicast-suppression commands use the chip to physically suppress traffic. They have less influence on the device performance than the storm-constrain command, which uses software to suppress traffic.

For the traffic suppression result to be determined, do not configure both storm control and storm suppression for the same type of traffic.

When configuring this command, make sure upperlimit is greater than lowerlimit.

Examples

# Enable unknown unicast storm control on HundredGigE 1/0/1 and set the upper and lower thresholds to 200 pps and 150 pps, respectively.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] storm-constrain unicast pps 200 150

# Enable broadcast storm control on HundredGigE 1/0/2, and set the upper and lower thresholds to 2000 kbps and 1500 kbps, respectively.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/2] storm-constrain broadcast kbps 2000 1500

# Enable multicast storm control on HundredGigE 1/0/3, and set the upper and lower thresholds to 80% and 15%, respectively.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/3

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/3] storm-constrain multicast ratio 80 15

Related commands

storm-constrain control

storm-constrain interval

storm-constrain control

Use storm-constrain control to set the action to take on an Ethernet interface when a type of traffic (unknown unicast, multicast, or broadcast) exceeds the upper storm control threshold.

Use undo storm-constrain control to restore the default.

Syntax

storm-constrain control { block | shutdown }

undo storm-constrain control

Default

No action is taken on an Ethernet interface when a type of traffic exceeds the upper storm control threshold.

Views

Layer 2 Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

block: Blocks this type of traffic and forwards other types of traffic. Even though the interface does not forward the blocked traffic, it still counts the traffic. When the blocked traffic drops below the lower threshold, the port begins to forward the traffic.

shutdown: Goes down automatically. The interface goes down automatically and stops forwarding any traffic. When the blocked traffic drops below the lower threshold, the interface does not forward the traffic. To bring up the interface, use the undo shutdown command or disable storm control on the interface.

Examples

# Configure HundredGigE 1/0/1 to block a specific type of traffic when the type of traffic exceeds the upper storm control threshold.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] storm-constrain control block

Related commands

storm-constrain

storm-constrain control

storm-constrain enable log

Use storm-constrain enable log to enable an Ethernet interface to output log messages when it detects storm control threshold events.

Use undo storm-constrain enable log to disable an Ethernet interface from outputting log messages for storm control threshold events.

Syntax

storm-constrain enable log

undo storm-constrain enable log

Default

An Ethernet interface outputs log messages when monitored traffic exceeds the upper threshold or drops below the lower threshold from a value above the upper threshold.

Views

Layer 2 Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Examples

# Enable HundredGigE 1/0/1 to output log messages when it detects storm control threshold events.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] storm-constrain enable log

storm-constrain enable trap

Use storm-constrain enable trap to enable an Ethernet interface to send storm control threshold event traps.

Use undo storm-constrain enable trap to disable an Ethernet interface from sending storm control threshold event traps.

Syntax

storm-constrain enable trap

undo storm-constrain enable trap

Default

An interface sends out storm control threshold event traps when monitored traffic exceeds the upper threshold or drops below the lower threshold from a value above the upper threshold.

Views

Layer 2 Ethernet interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Examples

# Enable HundredGigE 1/0/1 to send traps when it detects storm control threshold events.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] storm-constrain enable trap

storm-constrain interval

Use storm-constrain interval to set the traffic polling interval of the storm control module.

Use undo storm-constrain interval to restore the default.

Syntax

storm-constrain interval interval

undo storm-constrain interval

Default

The storm control module polls traffic statistics every 10 seconds.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

interval: Sets the traffic polling interval of the storm control module. The value range is 1 to 300 seconds. To ensure network stability, as a best practice, do not use a traffic polling interval shorter than 10 seconds.

Usage guidelines

The traffic polling interval set by using the storm-constrain interval command is specific to storm control. To set the statistics polling interval of an interface, use the flow-interval command.

Examples

# Set the traffic statistics polling interval of the storm control module to 60 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] storm-constrain interval 60

Related commands

storm-constrain

storm-constrain control

Layer 3 Ethernet interface or subinterface commands

mac-address

Use mac-address to set the MAC address of an Ethernet interface.

Use undo mac-address to restore the default.

Syntax

mac-address mac-address

undo mac-address

Default

No MAC address is set for a Layer 3 Ethernet interface.

Views

Layer 3 Ethernet interface view

Layer 3 Ethernet subinterface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

mac-address: Specifies a MAC address in the format of H-H-H.

Usage guidelines

When you set a MAC address for a Layer 3 Ethernet subinterface, select a MAC address different from that of the main interface.

Do not set a VRRP-reserved MAC address for a Layer 3 Ethernet subinterface.

Examples

# Set the MAC address of HundredGigE 1/0/1 to 0001-0001-0001.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] mac-address 1-1-1

mtu

Use mtu to set the MTU for an Ethernet interface or subinterface.

Use undo mtu to restore the default.

Syntax

mtu size

undo mtu

Default

The MTU of an Ethernet interface or subinterface is 1500 bytes.

Views

Layer 3 Ethernet interface view

Layer 3 Ethernet subinterface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

size: Sets the MTU in bytes. The value range for this argument is 46 to 9008.

Usage guidelines

The MTU configured on an interface takes effect only on packets sent to the CPU for software forwarding. Configure the MTU as appropriate for interfaces in the network to avoid fragmentation.

If an interface supports both the mtu and ip mtu commands, the device fragments an IPv4 packet based on the MTU set by using the ip mtu command. For more information about the ip mtu command, see Layer 3—IP Services Command Reference.

Examples

# Set the MTU to 1430 bytes for HundredGigE 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1] mtu 1430

# Set the MTU to 1430 bytes for HundredGigE 1/0/1.1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface hundredgige 1/0/1.1

[Sysname-HundredGigE1/0/1.1] mtu 1430

 

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