06-MPLS Configuration Guide

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04-MPLS TE configuration
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Contents

Configuring MPLS TE·· 1

About MPLS TE· 1

TE and MPLS TE· 1

MPLS TE basic concepts· 1

Static CRLSP establishment 2

Dynamic CRLSP establishment 2

CRLSP establishment using PCE path calculation· 4

Traffic forwarding· 5

Make-before-break· 6

Route pinning· 7

Tunnel reoptimization· 7

CRLSP backup· 7

FRR· 7

DiffServ-aware TE· 8

CBTS· 11

Protocols and standards· 12

MPLS TE tasks at a glance· 12

Establishing a static CRLSP· 12

Establishing a CRLSP dynamically· 13

Establishing a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs· 14

Prerequisites for MPLS TE· 15

Enabling MPLS TE· 15

Configuring a tunnel interface· 15

Configuring DS-TE· 16

Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a static CRLSP· 18

Configuring MPLS TE attributes for a link· 18

Advertising link TE attributes by using IGP TE extension· 19

About IGP TE extension· 19

Restrictions and guidelines for advertising link TE attributes by using IGP TE extension· 19

Configuring OSPF TE· 19

Configuring IS-IS TE· 20

Configuring MPLS TE tunnel constraints· 21

Configuring bandwidth constraints for an MPLS TE tunnel 21

Configuring the affinity attribute for an MPLS TE tunnel 21

Setting a setup priority and a holding priority for an MPLS TE tunnel 21

Configuring an explicit path for an MPLS TE tunnel 22

Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE· 23

Controlling CRLSP path selection· 23

About CRLSP path selection· 23

Restrictions and guidelines for CRLSP path selection control 23

Configuring the metric type for path selection· 24

Specifying the attribute usage preference for MPLS TE tunnel setup· 25

Configuring route pinning· 25

Configuring tunnel reoptimization· 26

Setting TE flooding thresholds and interval 26

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic to the new CRLSP· 27

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before deleting the old CRLSP· 27

Controlling MPLS TE tunnel setup· 28

About MPLS TE tunnel setup control 28

Restrictions and guidelines for MPLS TE tunnel setup control 28

Enabling loop detection· 28

Enabling route and label recording· 28

Setting tunnel setup retry· 29

Configuring RSVP resource reservation style· 29

Configuring path verification· 30

Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a CRLSP calculated by PCEs· 30

Configuring a PCE· 30

Discovering PCEs· 31

Establishing a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs· 31

Configuring stateful PCEP· 32

Configuring PCEP session parameters· 34

Configuring unequal load sharing for an MPLS TE tunnel 35

Configuring tunnel bundle interface-based unequal load sharing· 35

Configuring tunnel interface-based unequal load sharing· 35

Configuring traffic forwarding· 36

Configuring static routing to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel 36

Configuring PBR to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel 37

Configuring automatic route advertisement to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel 37

Configuring CRLSP/SRLSP backup· 39

About CRLSP/SRLSP backup· 39

Restrictions and guidelines for CRLSP/SRLSP backup· 39

Enabling CRLSP/SRLSP backup for an MPLS TE tunnel 39

Configuring the backup path setup mode· 39

Configuring CSPF to include the SRLG constraint in backup path compuation· 40

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic back to the primary path· 40

Configuring MPLS TE FRR· 41

Restrictions and guidelines for MPLS TE FRR· 41

Enabling FRR· 41

Configuring a bypass tunnel on the PLR· 41

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic back to the primary CRLSP· 42

Configuring node fault detection· 43

Setting the optimal bypass tunnel selection interval 44

Configuring CBTS· 44

Configuring MPLS TE tunnel statistics· 44

Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS TE· 45

Display and maintenance commands for MPLS TE· 45

MPLS TE configuration examples· 47

Example: Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel over a static CRLSP· 47

Example: Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel with RSVP-TE· 52

Example: Establishing an inter-AS MPLS TE tunnel with RSVP-TE· 58

Example: Establishing an inter-area MPLS TE tunnel over a CRLSP calculated by PCEs· 65

Example: Configuring CRLSP backup· 69

Example: Configuring manual bypass tunnel for FRR· 73

Example: Configuring IETF DS-TE· 79

Example: Configuring CBTS· 86

Troubleshooting MPLS TE· 91

No TE LSA generated· 91

 


Configuring MPLS TE

About MPLS TE

TE and MPLS TE

Network congestion can degrade the network backbone performance. It might occur when network resources are inadequate or when load distribution is unbalanced. Traffic engineering (TE) is intended to avoid the latter situation where partial congestion might occur because of improper resource allocation.

TE can make the best use of network resources and avoid uneven load distribution by using the following functionalities:

·     Real-time monitoring of traffic and traffic load on network elements.

·     Dynamic tuning of traffic management attributes, routing parameters, and resources constraints.

MPLS TE combines the MPLS technology and traffic engineering. It reserves resources by establishing LSP tunnels along the specified paths, allowing traffic to bypass congested nodes to achieve appropriate load distribution.

With MPLS TE, a service provider can deploy traffic engineering on the existing MPLS backbone to provide various services and optimize network resources management.

MPLS TE basic concepts

CRLSP

To establish a Constraint-based Routed Label Switched Path (CRLSP), you must configure routing, and specify constraints, such as the bandwidth and explicit paths.

SRLSP

A Segment Routing Label Switched Path (SRLSP) is the path along which SR uses MPLS labels as segment identifiers (SIDs) to forward packets.

You can manually configure SRLSPs or configure a controller to dynamically create SRLSPs. For more information, see MPLS SR configuration in Segment Routing Configuration Guide.

MPLS TE tunnel

An MPLS TE tunnel is a virtual point-to-point connection from the ingress node to the egress node. Typically, an MPLS TE tunnel consists of one CRLSP or SRLSP. To deploy forwarding path backup or transmit traffic over multiple paths, you need to establish multiple CRLSPs or SRLSPs for one class of traffic. In this case, an MPLS TE tunnel consists of a set of CRLSPs or SRLSPs.

An MPLS TE tunnel is identified by an MPLS TE tunnel interface on the ingress node. When the outgoing interface of a traffic flow is an MPLS TE tunnel interface, the traffic flow is forwarded through the CRLSP or SRLSP of the MPLS TE tunnel. For information about configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use static SRLSPs, see MPLS SR configuration in Segment Routing Configuration Guide.

 

 

NOTE:

The type of an MPLS TE tunnel interface is CRLSP no matter whether the tunnel consists of CRLSPs or SRLSPs.

 

Static CRLSP establishment

A static CRLSP is established by manually specifying the incoming label, outgoing label, and other constraints on each hop along the path that the traffic travels. Static CRLSPs feature simple configuration, but they cannot automatically adapt to network changes.

For more information about static CRLSPs, see "Configuring a static CRLSP."

Dynamic CRLSP establishment

Dynamic CRLSPs are dynamically established as follows:

1.     An IGP advertises TE attributes for links.

2.     MPLS TE uses the CSPF algorithm to calculate the shortest path to the tunnel destination.

The path must meet constraints such as bandwidth and explicit routing.

3.     A label distribution protocol (such as RSVP-TE) advertises labels to establish CRLSPs and reserves bandwidth resources on each node along the calculated path.

Dynamic CRLSPs adapt to network changes and support CRLSP backup and fast reroute, but they require complicated configurations.

Advertising TE attributes

MPLS TE uses extended link state IGPs, such as OSPF and IS-IS, to advertise TE attributes for links.

TE attributes include the maximum bandwidth, maximum reservable bandwidth, non-reserved bandwidth for each priority, and the link attribute. The IGP floods TE attributes on the network. Each node collects the TE attributes of all links on all routers within the local area or at the same level to build up a TE database (TEDB).

Calculating paths

Based on the TEDB, MPLS TE uses the Constraint-based Shortest Path First (CSPF) algorithm, an improved SPF algorithm, to calculate the shortest, TE constraints-compliant path to the tunnel destination.

CSPF first prunes TE constraints-incompliant links from the TEDB, and then it performs SPF calculation to identify the shortest path (a set of LSR addresses) to an egress. CSPF calculation is usually performed on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel.

TE constraints are configured on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel. The constraints include the following:

·     Bandwidth

Bandwidth constraints specify the class of service and the required bandwidth for the traffic to be forwarded along the MPLS TE tunnel. A link complies with the bandwidth constraints when the reservable bandwidth for the class type is greater than or equal to the bandwidth required by the class type.

·     Affinity

Affinity determines which links a tunnel can use. The affinity attribute and its mask, and the link attribute are all 32-bit long. A link is available for a tunnel if the link attribute meets the following requirements:

¡     The link attribute bits corresponding to the affinity attribute's 1 bits whose mask bits are 1 must have a minimum of one bit set to 1.

¡     The link attribute bits corresponding to the affinity attribute's 0 bits whose mask bits are 1 must have no bit set to 1.

The link attribute bits corresponding to the 0 bits in the affinity mask are not checked.

For example, if the affinity attribute is 0xFFFFFFF0 and its mask is 0x0000FFFF, a link is available for the tunnel when its link attribute bits meet the following requirements:

¡     The highest 16 bits each can be 0 or 1 (no requirements).

¡     The 17th through 28th bits must have a minimum of one bit whose value is 1.

¡     The lowest four bits must be 0.

·     Setup priority and holding priority

If MPLS TE cannot find a qualified path to set up an MPLS TE tunnel, it removes an existing MPLS TE tunnel and preempts its bandwidth.

MPLS TE uses the setup priority and holding priority to make preemption decisions. For a new MPLS TE tunnel to preempt an existing MPLS TE tunnel, the setup priority of the new tunnel must be higher than the holding priority of the existing tunnel. Both setup and holding priorities are in the range of 0 to 7. A smaller value represents a higher priority.

To avoid flapping caused by improper preemptions, the setup priority value of a tunnel must be equal to or greater than the holding priority value.

·     Explicit path

Explicit path specifies the nodes to pass and the nodes to not pass for a tunnel.

Explicit paths include the following types:

¡     Strict explicit path—Among the nodes that the path must traverse, a node and its previous hop must be directly connected. Strict explicit path precisely specifies the path that an MPLS TE tunnel must traverse.

¡     Loose explicit path—Among the nodes that the path must traverse, a node and its previous hop can be indirectly connected. Loose explicit path vaguely specifies the path that an MPLS TE tunnel must traverse.

Strict explicit path and loose explicit path can be used together to specify that some nodes are directly connected and some nodes have other nodes in between.

·     SRLG

A Shared Risk Link Group (SRLG) is a set of links that share a resource. If one link in the group fails, all other links also fail. For example, if the primary and backup SRLSPs are establish on links that belong to the same SRLG, the backup path cannot protect the primary path.

To improve TE tunnel availability, you can configure the device to include the SRLG constraint in backup path computation by using the following methods:

¡     Configure CSPF to include the SRLG constraint in the computation of a backup path. This ensures that the primary and backup paths of a tunnel does not use links in the same SRLG.

¡     Exclude SRLG links from an explicit path. The MPLS TE tunnel that uses the explicit path will avoid using the links that are in the same SRLG as the interface it is protecting.

Currently, only SRLSPs support SRLG settings. For more information about SRLSPs, see MPLS SR in Segment Routing Configuration Guide.

Setting up a CRLSP through RSVP-TE

After calculating a path by using CSPF, MPLS TE uses a label distribution protocol to set up the CRLSP and reserves resources on each node of the path.

The device supports the label distribution protocol of RSVP-TE for MPLS TE. Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) reserves resources on each node along a path. Extended RSVP can support MPLS label distribution and allow resource reservation information to be transmitted with label bindings. This extended RSVP is called RSVP-TE.

For more information about RSVP, see "Configuring RSVP."

CRLSP establishment using PCE path calculation

On an MPLS TE network, a Path Computation Client (PCC), usually an LSR, uses the path calculated by Path Computation Elements (PCEs) to establish a CRLSP through RSVP-TE.

Basic concepts

·     PCE—An entity that provides intra-area or inter-area path calculation. A PCE can be stateless (the default) or stateful.

¡     Stateless PCE—Provides only path calculation.

¡     Stateful PCE—Knows all CRLSPs maintained by a PCC, and performs intra-area CRLSP recalculation and optimization. A stateful PCE can be active or passive.

-     Active stateful PCE—Accepts CRLSP delegation requests sent by a PCC and optimizes the CRLSPs.

-     Passive stateful PCE—Only maintains CRLSP information for a PCC. A passive stateful PCE does not accept CRLSP delegation requests sent by a PCC or optimize the CRLSPs.

·     PCC—A PCC sends a request to PCEs for path calculation and uses the path information returned by PCEs to establish a CRLSP. By default, a PCC is a stateless PCC. For a PCC to establish a stateful PCEP session with an active or passive stateful PCE, the PCC must also be configured as active stateful or passive stateful.

·     PCEP—Path Computation Element Protocol. PCEP runs between a PCC and a PCE, or between PCEs. It is used to establish PCEP sessions to exchange PCEP messages over TCP connections.

PCE discovery mechanism

A PCE can be manually specified on a PCC or automatically discovered through the PCE information advertised by OSPF TE.

PCE path calculation

PCE path calculation has the following types:

·     EPC—External Path Computation. EPC path calculation is performed by one PCE. It is applicable to intra-area path calculation.

·     BRPC—Backward-Recursive PCE-Based Computation. BRPC path calculation is performed by multiple PCEs. It is applicable to inter-area path calculation.

As shown in Figure 1, PCE 1 is the ABR that can calculate paths in Area 0 and Area 1. PCE 2 is the ABR that can calculate paths in Area 1 and Area 2. The CRLSP that PCC uses to reach a destination in Area 2 is established as follows:

1.     PCC sends a path calculation request to PCE 1 to request the path to the CRLSP destination.

2.     PCE 1 forwards the request to PCE 2.

PCE 1 cannot calculate paths in Area 2, so it forwards the request to PCE 2, the PCE responsible for Area 2 that contains the CRLSP destination.

3.     After receiving the request from PCE 1, PCE 2 calculates potential paths to the CRLSP destination and sends the path information back to PCE 1 in a reply.

4.     PCE 1 uses the local and received path information to select an end-to-end path for the PCC to reach the CRLSP destination, and sends the path to PCC as a reply.

5.     PCC uses the path calculated by PCEs to establish the CRLSP through RSVP-TE.

Figure 1 BRPC path calculation

 

Traffic forwarding

After an MPLS TE tunnel is established, traffic is not forwarded on the tunnel automatically. You must direct the traffic to the tunnel by using one of the following methods:

Static routing

You can direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel by creating a static route that reaches the destination through the tunnel interface. This is the easiest way to implement MPLS TE tunnel forwarding. When traffic to multiple networks is to be forwarded through the MPLS TE tunnel, you must configure multiple static routes, which are complicated to configure and difficult to maintain.

For more information about static routing, see Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Policy-based routing

You can configure PBR on the ingress interface of traffic to direct the traffic that matches an ACL to the MPLS TE tunnel interface.

PBR can match the traffic to be forwarded on the tunnel not only by destination IP address, but also by source IP address, protocol type, and other criteria. Compared with static routing, PBR is more flexible but requires more complicated configuration.

For more information about policy-based routing, see Layer 3IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Automatic route advertisement

You can also configure automatic route advertisement to forward traffic through an MPLS TE tunnel. Automatic route advertisement distributes the MPLS TE tunnel to the IGP (OSPF or IS-IS), so the MPLS TE tunnel can participate in IGP routing calculation. Automatic route advertisement is easy to configure and maintain.

Automatic route advertisement can be implemented by using the following methods:

·     IGP shortcut—Also known as AutoRoute Announce. It considers the MPLS TE tunnel as a link that directly connects the tunnel ingress node and the egress node. Only the ingress node uses the MPLS TE tunnel during IGP route calculation.

·     Forwarding adjacency—Considers the MPLS TE tunnel as a link that directly connects the tunnel ingress node and the egress node, and advertises the link to the network through an IGP. Every node in the network uses the MPLS TE tunnel during IGP route calculation.

As shown in Figure 2, an MPLS TE tunnel exists from Device D to Device C. IGP shortcut enables only the ingress node Device D to use the MPLS TE tunnel in the IGP route calculation. Device A cannot use this tunnel to reach Device C. With forwarding adjacency enabled, Device A can learn this MPLS TE tunnel and transfer traffic to Device C by forwarding the traffic to Device D.

Figure 2 IGP shortcut and forwarding adjacency diagram

 

Make-before-break

Make-before-break is a mechanism to change an MPLS TE tunnel with minimum data loss and without using extra bandwidth.

In cases of tunnel reoptimization, traffic forwarding is interrupted if the existing CRLSP is removed before a new CRLSP is established. The make-before-break mechanism ensures that a new CRLSP is established to take over traffic forwarding before tearing down the existing CRLSP.. However, this wastes bandwidth resources if some links on the old and new CRLSPs are the same. This is because you need to reserve bandwidth on these links for the old and new CRLSPs separately. The make-before-break mechanism uses the SE resource reservation style to address this problem.

The resource reservation style refers to the style in which RSVP-TE reserves bandwidth resources during CRLSP establishment. The resource reservation style used by an MPLS TE tunnel is determined by the ingress node, and is advertised to other nodes through RSVP.

The device supports the following resource reservation styles:

·     FF—Fixed-filter, where resources are reserved for individual senders and cannot be shared among senders on the same session.

·     SE—Shared-explicit, where resources are reserved for senders on the same session and shared among them. SE is mainly used for make-before-break.

As shown in Figure 3, a CRLSP with 30 M reserved bandwidth has been set up from Device A to Device D through the path Device A—Device B—Device C—Device D.

To increase the reserved bandwidth to 40 M, a new CRLSP must be set up through the path Device A—Device E—Device C—Device D. To achieve this purpose, RSVP-TE needs to reserve 30 M bandwidth for the old CRLSP and 40 M bandwidth for the new CRLSP on the link Device C—Device D. However, there is not enough bandwidth.

After the make-before-break mechanism is used, the new CRLSP can share the bandwidth reserved for the old CRLSP. After the new CRLSP is set up, traffic is switched to the new CRLSP without service interruption, and then the old CRLSP is removed.

Figure 3 Diagram for make-before-break

 

Route pinning

Route pinning enables CRLSPs to always use the original optimal path even if a new optimal route has been learned.

On a network where route changes frequently occur, you can use route pinning to avoid re-establishing CRLSPs upon route changes.

Tunnel reoptimization

Tunnel reoptimization allows you to manually or dynamically trigger the ingress node to recalculate a path. If the ingress node recalculates a better path, it creates a new CRLSP, switches traffic from the old CRLSP to the new, and then deletes the old CRLSP.

MPLS TE uses the tunnel reoptimization feature to implement dynamic CRLSP optimization. For example, if a link on the optimal path does not have enough reservable bandwidth, MPLS TE sets up the tunnel on another path. When the link has enough bandwidth, the tunnel optimization feature can switch the MPLS TE tunnel to the optimal path.

CRLSP backup

CRLSP backup uses a CRLSP to back up a primary CRLSP. When the ingress detects that the primary CRLSP fails, it switches traffic to the backup CRLSP. When the primary CRLSP recovers, the ingress switches traffic back.

CRLSP backup has the following modes:

·     Hot standby—A backup CRLSP is created immediately after a primary CRLSP is created.

·     Ordinary—A backup CRLSP is created after the primary CRLSP fails.

FRR

Fast reroute (FRR) protects CRLSPs from link and node failures. FRR can implement 50-millisecond CRLSP failover.

After FRR is enabled for an MPLS TE tunnel, once a link or node fails on the primary CRLSP, FRR reroutes the traffic to a bypass tunnel. The ingress node attempts to set up a new CRLSP. After the new CRLSP is set up, traffic is forwarded on the new CRLSP.

CRLSP backup provides end-to-end path protection for a CRLSP without time limitation. FRR provides quick but temporary protection for a link or node on a CRLSP.

Basic concepts

·     Primary CRLSP—Protected CRLSP.

·     Bypass tunnel—An MPLS TE tunnel used to protect a link or node of the primary CRLSP.

·     Point of local repair—A PLR is the ingress node of the bypass tunnel. It must be located on the primary CRLSP but must not be the egress node of the primary CRLSP.

·     Merge point—An MP is the egress node of the bypass tunnel. It must be located on the primary CRLSP but must not be the ingress node of the primary CRLSP.

Protection modes

FRR provides the following protection modes:

·     Link protection—The PLR and the MP are connected through a direct link and the primary CRLSP traverses this link. When the link fails, traffic is switched to the bypass tunnel. As shown in Figure 4, the primary CRLSP is Device A—Device B—Device C—Device D, and the bypass tunnel is Device B—Device F—Device C. This mode is also called next-hop (NHOP) protection.

Figure 4 FRR link protection

 

·     Node protection—The PLR and the MP are connected through a device and the primary CRLSP traverses this device. When the device fails, traffic is switched to the bypass tunnel. As shown in Figure 5, the primary CRLSP is Device A—Device B—Device C—Device D—Device E, and the bypass tunnel is Device B—Device F—Device D. Device C is the protected device. This mode is also called next-next-hop (NNHOP) protection.

Figure 5 FRR node protection

 

DiffServ-aware TE

DiffServ is a model that provides differentiated QoS guarantees based on class of service. MPLS TE is a traffic engineering solution that focuses on optimizing network resources allocation.

DiffServ-aware TE (DS-TE) combines DiffServ and TE to optimize network resources allocation on a per-service class basis. DS-TE defines different bandwidth constraints for class types. It maps each traffic class type to the CRLSP that is constraint-compliant for the class type.

The device supports the following DS-TE modes:

·     Prestandard mode—H3C proprietary DS-TE.

·     IETF mode—Complies with RFC 4124, RFC 4125, and RFC 4127.

Basic concepts

·     CT—Class Type. DS-TE allocates link bandwidth, implements constraint-based routing, and performs admission control on a per-class type basis. A given traffic flow belongs to the same CT on all links.

·     BC—Bandwidth Constraint. BC restricts the bandwidth for one or more CTs.

·     Bandwidth constraint model—Algorithm for implementing bandwidth constraints on different CTs. A BC model contains two factors, the maximum number of BCs (MaxBC) and the mappings between BCs and CTs. DS-TE supports the following BC models: Russian Dolls Model (RDM), Maximum Allocation Model (MAM), and Extended Maximum Allocation Model (Extended-MAM).

·     TE class—Defines a CT and a priority. The setup priority or holding priority of an MPLS TE tunnel for a CT must be the same as the priority of the TE class.

The prestandard and IETF modes of DS-TE have the following differences:

·     The prestandard mode supports 2 CTs (CT 0 and CT 1), 8 priorities, and a maximum of 16 TE classes. The IETF mode supports 8 CTs (CT 0 through CT 7), 8 priorities, and a maximum of 16 TE classes.

·     The prestandard mode does not allow you to configure TE classes. The IETF mode allows for TE class configuration.

·     The prestandard mode supports only RDM. The IETF mode supports RDM, MAM, and Extended-MAM.

·     A device operating in prestandard mode cannot communicate with devices from some vendors. A device operating in IETF mode can communicate with devices from other vendors.

How DS-TE operates

A device takes the following steps to establish an MPLS TE tunnel for a CT:

1.     Determines the CT.

A device classifies traffic according to your configuration:

¡     When configuring a dynamic MPLS TE tunnel, you can use the mpls te bandwidth command on the tunnel interface to specify a CT for the traffic to be forwarded by the tunnel.

¡     When configuring a static MPLS TE tunnel, you can use the bandwidth keyword to specify a CT for the traffic to be forwarded along the tunnel.

2.     Verifies that bandwidth is enough for the CT.

You can use the mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth command on an interface to configure the bandwidth constraints of the interface. The device determines whether the bandwidth is enough to establish an MPLS TE tunnel for the CT.

The relation between BCs and CTs varies by BC model.

In RDM model, a BC constrains the total bandwidth of multiple CTs, as shown in Figure 6:

¡     BC 2 is for CT 2. The total bandwidth for CT 2 cannot exceed BC 2.

¡     BC 1 is for CT 2 and CT 1. The total bandwidth for CT 2 and CT 1 cannot exceed BC 1.

¡     BC 0 is for CT 2, CT 1, and CT 0. The total bandwidth for CT 2, CT 1, and CT 0 cannot exceed BC 0. In this model, BC 0 equals the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link.

In cooperation with priority preemption, the RDM model can also implement bandwidth isolation between CTs. RDM is suitable for networks where traffic is unstable and traffic bursts might occur.

Figure 6 RDM bandwidth constraints model

 

In MAM model, a BC constrains the bandwidth for only one CT. This ensures bandwidth isolation among CTs no matter whether preemption is used or not. Compared with RDM, MAM is easier to configure. MAM is suitable for networks where traffic of each CT is stable and no traffic bursts occur. Figure 7 shows an example:

¡     BC 0 is for CT 0. The bandwidth occupied by the traffic of CT 0 cannot exceed BC 0.

¡     BC 1 is for CT 1. The bandwidth occupied by the traffic of CT 1 cannot exceed BC 1.

¡     BC 2 is for CT 2. The bandwidth occupied by the traffic of CT 2 cannot exceed BC 2.

¡     The total bandwidth occupied by CT 0, CT 1, and CT 2 cannot exceed the maximum reservable bandwidth.

Similar to MAM, Extended MAM constrains the bandwidth for only one CT on an interface, and CTs do not share bandwidth. Extended MAM can reserve bandwidth for multiple CTs on one LSP. Extended MAM supports eight CTs (CT 0 through CT 7) and 16 TE classes (TE class 0 through TE class 15). The default mappings of the first eight TE classes are the same as MAM TE classes. The last eight TE classes define the mappings between CT 0 and priorities 0 to 7, and they are not configurable.

Figure 7 MAM/Extended-MAM bandwidth constraints model

 

3.     Verifies that the CT and the LSP setup/holding priority match an existing TE class.

An MPLS TE tunnel can be established for the CT only when the following conditions are met:

¡     Every node along the tunnel has a TE class that matches the CT and the LSP setup priority.

¡     Every node along the tunnel has a TE class that matches the CT and the LSP holding priority.

CBTS

 

About this task

Class Based Tunnel Selection (CBTS) enables dynamic routing and forwarding of traffic with service class values over different MPLS TE tunnels between the same tunnel headend and tailend. Unlike load sharing that selects multiple tunnels to forward the matching traffic, CBTS uses a dedicated tunnel for a certain class of service.

How CBTS works

CBTS processes incoming traffic on the device as follows:

1.     Uses a traffic behavior to set a service class value for the traffic. For more information about traffic behaviors, see QoS configuration in ACL and QoS Configuration Guide.

2.     Compares the service class value of the traffic with the service class values of the MPLS TE tunnels and forwards the traffic to a matching tunnel.

MPLS TE tunnel selection rules

CBTS uses the following rules to select an MPLS TE tunnel for the incoming traffic:

·     If the traffic matches an MPLS TE tunnel, CBTS uses this tunnel.

·     If the traffic matches multiple MPLS TE tunnels, CBTS selects a tunnel based on the flow forwarding mode set on the tunnel interface:

¡     If there is only one flow and flow-based forwarding is set, CBTS randomly selects a matching tunnel for packets of the same flow.

¡     If there are multiple flows or if there is only one flow but packet-based forwarding is set, CBTS uses all matching tunnels to load share the packets.

·     If the traffic does not match any MPLS TE tunnels, CBTS randomly selects a tunnel from all tunnels with the smallest service class value.

CBTS application scenario

As shown in Figure 8, CBTS selects MPLS TE tunnels for the incoming traffic as follows:

·     Uses Tunnel 2 to forward traffic with service class value 3.

·     Uses Tunnel 3 to forward traffic with service class value 6.

·     Uses Tunnel 1 to forward traffic with no service class value.

Figure 8 CBTS application scenario

 

Protocols and standards

·     RFC 2702, Requirements for Traffic Engineering Over MPLS

·     RFC 3564, Requirements for Support of Differentiated Service-aware MPLS Traffic Engineering

·     RFC 3812, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineering (TE) Management Information Base (MIB)

·     RFC 4124, Protocol Extensions for Support of Diffserv-aware MPLS Traffic Engineering

·     RFC 4125, Maximum Allocation Bandwidth Constraints Model for Diffserv-aware MPLS Traffic Engineering

·     RFC 4127, Russian Dolls Bandwidth Constraints Model for Diffserv-aware MPLS Traffic Engineering

·     ITU-T Recommendation Y.1720, Protection switching for MPLS networks

·     RFC 4655, A Path Computation Element (PCE)-Based Architecture

·     RFC 5088, OSPF Protocol Extensions for Path Computation Element Discovery

·     RFC 5440, Path Computation Element (PCE) Communication Protocol (PCEP)

·     RFC 5441, A Backward-Recursive PCE-Based Computation (BRPC) Procedure to Compute Shortest Constrained Inter-Domain Traffic Engineering LSP

·     RFC 5455, Diffserv-Aware Class-Type Object for the Path Computation Element Communication Protocol

·     RFC 5521, Extensions to the Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) for Route Exclusions

·     RFC 5886, A Set of Monitoring Tools for Path Computation Element (PCE)-Based Architecture

·     draft-ietf-pce-stateful-pce-07

·     draft-ietf-pce-pce-initiated-lsp-09

·     draft-minei-diffserv-te-multi-class-02.txt

MPLS TE tasks at a glance

Establishing a static CRLSP

1.     Enabling MPLS TE

Perform this task on all nodes and interfaces that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

2.     Configuring a tunnel interface

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

3.     (Optional.) Configuring DS-TE

This task is configurable on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

4.     Establishing a static CRLSP

This task is required on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

For more information, see "Configuring a static CRLSP."

5.     Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a static CRLSP

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

6.     (Optional.) Configuring unequal load sharing for an MPLS TE tunnel

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

7.     Configuring traffic forwarding

Choose one of the following tasks:

¡     Configuring static routing to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

¡     Configuring PBR to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

¡     Configuring automatic route advertisement to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

Perform the tasks on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

8.     (Optional.) Configuring CBTS

9.     (Optional.) Configuring MPLS TE tunnel statistics

10.     (Optional.) Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS TE

Establishing a CRLSP dynamically

1.     Enabling MPLS TE and RSVP

¡     Enabling MPLS TE

¡     Enabling RSVP

For more information about enabling RSVP, see "Configuring RSVP."

Perform this task on all nodes and interfaces that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

2.     Configuring a tunnel interface

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

3.     (Optional.) Configuring DS-TE

This task is configurable on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

4.     Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a CRLSP dynamically established by RSVP-TE

a.     Configuring MPLS TE attributes for a link

Perform this task on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

b.     Advertising link TE attributes by using IGP TE extension

Perform this task on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

c.     Configuring MPLS TE tunnel constraints

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

d.     Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

e.     (Optional.) Controlling CRLSP path selection

f.     (Optional.) Controlling MPLS TE tunnel setup

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

5.     (Optional.) Configuring unequal load sharing for an MPLS TE tunnel

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

6.     Configuring traffic forwarding

Choose one of the following tasks:

¡     Configuring static routing to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

¡     Configuring PBR to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

¡     Configuring automatic route advertisement to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

Perform the tasks on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

7.     (Optional.) Enhancing MPLS TE availability

¡     Configuring CRLSP/SRLSP backup

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

¡     Configuring MPLS TE FRR

Enable FRR on the ingress node of the primary CRLSP.

8.     (Optional.) Configuring CBTS

9.     (Optional.) Configuring MPLS TE tunnel statistics

10.     (Optional.) Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS TE

Establishing a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs

1.     Enabling MPLS TE and RSVP

¡     Enabling MPLS TE

¡     Enabling RSVP

For more information about enabling RSVP, see "Configuring RSVP."

Perform this task on all nodes and interfaces that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

2.     Configuring a tunnel interface

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

3.     (Optional.) Configuring DS-TE

This task is configurable on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

4.     Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a CRLSP dynamically established by RSVP-TE

a.     Configuring MPLS TE attributes for a link

Perform this task on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

b.     Advertising link TE attributes by using IGP TE extension

Perform this task on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

c.     Configuring MPLS TE tunnel constraints

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

5.     Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a CRLSP calculated by PCEs

a.     Configuring a PCE

Perform this task on a device that acts as a PCE, regardless of whether the device is on the MPLS TE tunnel.

b.     Discovering PCEs

Perform this task on PCCs.

c.     Establishing a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs

Perform this task on PCCs.

d.     Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

e.     (Optional.) Configuring stateful PCE

Perform this task on PCCs.

f.     Configuring PCEP session parameters

Perform this task on PCCs.

6.     (Optional.) Configuring unequal load sharing for an MPLS TE tunnel

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

7.     Configuring traffic forwarding

Choose one of the following tasks:

¡     Configuring static routing to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

¡     Configuring PBR to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

¡     Configuring automatic route advertisement to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

Perform the tasks on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

8.     (Optional.) Enhancing MPLS TE availability

¡     Configuring CRLSP/SRLSP backup

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

¡     Configuring MPLS TE FRR

Enable FRR on the ingress node of the primary CRLSP.

9.     (Optional.) Configuring CBTS

10.     (Optional.) Configuring MPLS TE tunnel statistics

11.     (Optional.) Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS TE

Prerequisites for MPLS TE

Before you enable MPLS TE, perform the following tasks:

·     Configure static routing or IGP to ensure that all LSRs can reach each other.

·     Enable MPLS. For information about enabling MPLS, see "Configuring basic MPLS."

Enabling MPLS TE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable MPLS TE on the node and enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

By default, MPLS TE is disabled.

3.     Return to system view.

quit

4.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

5.     Enable MPLS TE for the interface.

mpls te enable

By default, MPLS TE is disabled on an interface.

Configuring a tunnel interface

About this task

To configure an MPLS TE tunnel, you must create an MPLS TE tunnel interface and enter tunnel interface view. All MPLS TE tunnel attributes are configured in tunnel interface view. For more information about tunnel interfaces, see tunneling configuration in Layer 3—IP Services Configuration Guide.

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

Restrictions and guidelines

On an up MPLS TE tunnel interface, perform the following operations with caution because they can cause interface down/up flappings:

·     Modifying the affinity attribute of the MPLS TE tunnel.

·     Modifying the setup priority and holding priority of the MPLS TE tunnel.

·     Modifying the MPLS TE tunnel configuration when the resources reservation style is FF.

·     Modifying the CT of the MPLS TE tunnel.

·     Specifying a primary or backup traffic processing slot for the tunnel interface.

·     Restarting or swapping the specified primary or backup traffic processing slot.

For more information about specifying traffic processing slots for an interface, see tunneling configuration in Layer 3—IP Services Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create an MPLS TE tunnel interface and enter tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number mode mpls-te

3.     Configure an IP address for the tunnel interface.

ip address ip-address { mask-length | mask }

By default, a tunnel interface does not have an IP address.

4.     Specify the tunnel destination address.

destination ip-address

By default, no tunnel destination address is specified.

5.     (Optional.) Configure the tunnel name of the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te signaled-name name

By default, an MPLS TE tunnel is named tunneltunnel-id, where tunnel-id is the tunnel ID.

Configuring DS-TE

About this task

DS-TE is configurable on any node that an MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Configure the DS-TE mode.

¡     Configure the DS-TE mode as IETF.

ds-te mode ietf

¡     Configure the DS-TE mode as prestandard.

undo ds-te mode ietf

By default, the DS-TE mode is prestandard.

4.     Configure the BC model of IETF DS-TE.

¡     Configure the BC model of IETF DS-TE as MAM.

ds-te bc-model mam

¡     Configure the BC model of IETF DS-TE as Extended-MAM.

ds-te bc-model extended-mam

¡     Configure the BC model of IETF DS-TE as RDM.

undo ds-te bc-model mam

By default, the BC model of IETF DS-TE is RDM.

5.     Configure a TE class used in IETF DS-TE mode.

ds-te te-class te-class-index class-type class-type-number priority priority

The default TE classes for IETF mode are shown in Table 1 and Table 2.

Table 1 Default TE classes in IETF MAM model

TE Class

CT

Priority

0

0

7

1

1

7

2

2

7

3

3

7

4

0

0

5

1

0

6

2

0

7

3

0

 

Table 2 Default TE classes in IETF Extended MAM model

TE Class

CT

Priority

0

0

7

1

1

7

2

2

7

3

3

7

4

0

0

5

1

0

6

2

0

7

3

0

8

0

0

9

0

1

10

0

2

11

0

3

12

0

4

13

0

5

14

0

6

15

0

7

 

TE class 8 through TE class 15 are implicit TE classes, which cannot be configured or displayed by commands.

Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a static CRLSP

About this task

Perform this task on the ingress node of the MPLS TE tunnel.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Specify the MPLS TE tunnel establishment mode as static.

mpls te signaling static

By default, MPLS TE uses RSVP-TE to establish a tunnel.

4.     Apply the static CRLSP to the tunnel interface.

mpls te static-cr-lsp lsp-name

By default, a tunnel does not use any static CRLSP.

Make sure the static CRLSP already exists. For more information about configuring a static CRLSP, see "Configuring a static CRLSP."

Configuring MPLS TE attributes for a link

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Set the maximum link bandwidth for MPLS TE traffic.

mpls te max-link-bandwidth { bandwidth-value | percent percent-bandwidth }

By default, the maximum link bandwidth for MPLS TE traffic is 0.

4.     Set the maximum reservable bandwidth. Use one of the following methods according to the DS-TE mode and BC model configured in "Configuring DS-TE."

¡     Configure the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link (BC 0) and BC 1 in RDM model of the prestandard DS-TE.

mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth { bandwidth-value [ bc1 bc1-bandwidth ] | percent percent-bandwidth [ bc1 bc1-percent-bandwidth ] }

¡     Configure the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link and the BCs in MAM or Extended-MAM model of the IETF DS-TE.

mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth mam { bandwidth-value { bc0 bc0-bandwidth | bc1 bc1-bandwidth | bc2 bc2-bandwidth | bc3 bc3-bandwidth | bc4 bc4-bandwidth | bc5 bc5-bandwidth | bc6 bc6-bandwidth | bc7 bc7-bandwidth } * | percent percent-bandwidth { bc0 bc0-percent-bandwidth | bc1 bc1-percent-bandwidth | bc2 bc2-percent-bandwidth | bc3 bc3-percent-bandwidth | bc4 bc4-percent-bandwidth | bc5 bc5-percent-bandwidth | bc6 bc6-percent-bandwidth | bc7 bc7-percent-bandwidth } * }

¡     Configure the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link and the BCs in RDM model of the IETF DS-TE.

mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm { bandwidth-value [ bc1 bc1-bandwidth ] [ bc2 bc2-bandwidth ] [ bc3 bc3-bandwidth ] | percent percent-bandwidth [ bc1 bc1-percent-bandwidth ] [ bc2 bc2-percent-bandwidth ] [ bc3 bc3-percent-bandwidth ] }

By default, the maximum reservable bandwidth of a link is 0 kbps and each BC is 0 kbps.

In RDM model, BC 0 is the maximum reservable bandwidth of a link.

5.     Set the link attribute.

mpls te link-attribute attribute-value

By default, the link attribute value is 0x00000000.

6.     Configure the SRLG membership of the interface.

mpls te srlg srlg-number

By default, an interface does not belong to an SRLG.

Advertising link TE attributes by using IGP TE extension

About IGP TE extension

Both OSPF and IS-IS are extended to advertise link TE attributes. The extensions are called OSPF TE and IS-IS TE. If both OSPF TE and IS-IS TE are available, OSPF TE takes precedence.

Restrictions and guidelines for advertising link TE attributes by using IGP TE extension

You must configure the IGP TE extension to establish a TEDB. Otherwise, the path is created based on IGP routing rather than computed by CSPF.

Configuring OSPF TE

About this task

OSPF TE uses Type-10 opaque LSAs to carry the TE attributes for a link. Before you configure OSPF TE, you must enable opaque LSA advertisement and reception by using the opaque-capability enable command. For more information about opaque LSA advertisement and reception, see OSPF configuration in Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Restrictions and guidelines

MPLS TE cannot reserve resources and distribute labels for an OSPF virtual link, and cannot establish a CRLSP through an OSPF virtual link. Therefore, make sure no virtual link exists in an OSPF area before you configure MPLS TE.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter OSPF view.

ospf [ process-id ]

3.     Enable opaque LSA advertisement and reception.

opaque-capability enable

By default, opaque LSA advertisement and reception are enabled.

For more information about this command, see OSPF commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

4.     Enter area view.

area area-id

5.     Enable MPLS TE for the OSPF area.

mpls te enable

By default, MPLS TE is disabled for an OSPF area.

Configuring IS-IS TE

About this task

IS-IS TE uses a sub-TLV of the extended IS reachability TLV (type 22) to carry TE attributes. Because the extended IS reachability TLV carries wide metrics, specify a wide metric-compatible metric style for the IS-IS process before enabling IS-IS TE. Available metric styles for IS-IS TE include wide, compatible, or wide-compatible. For more information about IS-IS, see IS-IS configuration in Layer 3—IP Routing Configuration Guide.

Restrictions and guidelines

On IS-IS enabled interfaces, set the MTU to a minimum of 512 bytes to ensure that IS-IS LSPs of different lengths can be flooded to the network.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create an IS-IS process and enter IS-IS view.

isis [ process-id ]

By default, no IS-IS process exists.

3.     Specify a metric style.

cost-style { narrow | wide | wide-compatible | { compatible | narrow-compatible } [ relax-spf-limit ] }

By default, only narrow metric style packets can be received and sent.

For more information about this command, see IS-IS commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

4.     Enable MPLS TE for the IS-IS process.

mpls te enable [ Level-1 | Level-2 ]

By default, MPLS TE is disabled for an IS-IS process.

5.     Specify the types of the sub-TLVs for carrying DS-TE parameters.

te-subtlv { bw-constraint value | unreserved-subpool-bw value } *

By default, the bw-constraint parameter is carried in sub-TLV 252, and the unreserved-bw-sub-pool parameter is carried in sub-TLV 251.

Configuring MPLS TE tunnel constraints

Configuring bandwidth constraints for an MPLS TE tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Configure bandwidth required for the tunnel, and specify a CT for the tunnel's traffic.

mpls te bandwidth { bandwidth | { ct0 ct0-bandwidth | ct1 ct1-bandwidth | ct2 ct2-bandwidth | ct3 ct3-bandwidth | ct4 ct4-bandwidth | ct5 ct5-bandwidth | ct6 ct6-bandwidth | ct7 ct7-bandwidth } * } * }

By default, no bandwidth is assigned, and the class type is CT 0.

If you specify multiple CTs for a tunnel, the tunnel will use the extended-MAM model to select links for the traffic.

Configuring the affinity attribute for an MPLS TE tunnel

About this task

The associations between the link attribute and the affinity attribute might vary by vendor. To ensure the successful establishment of a tunnel between two devices from different vendors, correctly configure their respective link attribute and affinity attribute.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Set an affinity for the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te affinity-attribute attribute-value [ mask mask-value ]

By default, the affinity is 0x00000000, and the mask is 0x00000000. The default affinity matches all link attributes.

Setting a setup priority and a holding priority for an MPLS TE tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Set a setup priority and a holding priority for the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te priority setup-priority [ hold-priority ]

By default, the setup priority and the holding priority are both 7 for an MPLS TE tunnel.

Configuring an explicit path for an MPLS TE tunnel

About this task

An explicit path is a set of nodes. The relationship between any two neighboring nodes on an explicit path can be either strict or loose.

·     Strict—The two nodes must be directly connected.

·     Loose—The two nodes can have devices in between.

Restrictions and guidelines

When establishing an MPLS TE tunnel between areas or ASs, you must perform the following tasks:

·     Use a loose explicit path.

·     Specify the ABR or ASBR as the next hop of the explicit path.

·     Make sure the tunnel's ingress node and the ABR or ASBR can reach each other.

For information about using an explicit path to establish an SR-signaled MPLS TE tunnel, see MPLS SR in Segment Routing Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create an explicit path and enter its view.

explicit-path path-name

3.     Enable the explicit path.

undo disable

By default, an explicit path is enabled.

4.     Add or modify a node in the explicit path.

¡     Specify a node by its IP address.

nexthop [ index index-number ] ip-address [ exclude | include [ [ loose | strict ] | [ incoming | outgoing ] ] * ]

You can specify the include keyword to have the CRLSP traverse the specified node or the exclude keyword to have the CRLSP bypass the specified node.

The incoming and outgoing keywords are supported only for explicit paths of MPLS TE tunnels signaled by using Segment Routing. For more information about MPLS SR, see Segment Routing Configuration Guide.

¡     Specify a node by its label.

nextsid [ index index-number ] label label-value type { adjacency | binding-sid | prefix }

Use this command only to set up an explicit path for MPLS TE tunnels signaled by using Segment Routing.

¡     Exclude all links that are in the same SRLG as the specified interface (identified by the specified IP address) from the explict path.

exclude-srlg [ index index-number] ip-address

Use this command only for setup of an explicit path for MPLS TE tunnels signaled by using Segment Routing.

By default, an explicit path does not include a node.

5.     Return to system view.

quit

6.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

7.     Configure the MPLS TE tunnel interface to use the explicit path, and specify a preference value for the explicit path.

mpls te path preference value explicit-path path-name [ no-cspf ]

By default, MPLS TE uses the calculated path to establish a CRLSP.

8.     (Optional.) Specify a BSID for the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te binding-sid label label-value

By default, an MPLS TE tunnel is not associated with a BSID.

This command is required when the nextsid command specifies the binding-sid keyword.

Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE

Restrictions and guidelines

To establish an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE, you must enable both MPLS TE and RSVP on the related interfaces. MPLS TE enables the link of the interfaces to participate in path computation. RSVP enables the interfaces to receive and send RSVP-TE protocol packets.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

mpls te signaling rsvp-te

By default, MPLS TE uses RSVP-TE to establish a tunnel.

4.     Specify an explicit path for the MPLS TE tunnel, and specify the path preference value.

mpls te path preference value { dynamic | explicit-path path-name } [ no-cspf ]

By default, MPLS TE uses the calculated path to establish a CRLSP.

Controlling CRLSP path selection

About CRLSP path selection

MPLS TE uses CSPF to calculate a path according to the TEDB and constraints and sets up the CRLSP through RSVP-TE. MPLS TE provides measures that affect the CSPF calculation. You can use these measures to tune the path selection for CRLSP.

Restrictions and guidelines for CRLSP path selection control

Before performing the configuration tasks in this section, be aware of each configuration objective and its impact on your device.

Configuring the metric type for path selection

About this task

Each MPLS TE link has two metrics: IGP metric and TE metric. By planning the two metrics, you can select different tunnels for different classes of traffic. For example, use the IGP metric to represent a link delay (a smaller IGP metric value indicates a lower link delay), and use the TE metric to represent a link bandwidth value (a smaller TE metric value indicates a bigger link bandwidth value).

You can establish two MPLS TE tunnels: Tunnel 1 for voice traffic and Tunnel 2 for video traffic. Configure Tunnel 1 to use IGP metrics for path selection, and configure Tunnel 2 to use TE metrics for path selection. As a result, the video service (with larger traffic) travels through the path that has larger bandwidth, and the voice traffic travels through the path that has lower delay.

The metric type can be explicitly specified for path selection of a tunnel or globally specified. To specify a global metric type, perform the task on the ingress node of the tunnels. To specify a metric type for a tunnel, perform the task on the tunnel interface. The metric type for a tunnel takes precedence over the global setting.

Configuring the global metric type for tunnel path selection

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Specify the global metric type for tunnel path selection.

path-metric-type { igp | te }

By default, a tunnel uses TE metrics of links for path selection when no global metric type is specified.

Configuring the metric type for path selection of a tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Specify the metric type for path selection.

mpls te path-metric-type { igp | te }

By default, no link metric type is specified for the tunnel and the tunnel uses the global metric type.

Assigning a TE metric to a link

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Assign a TE metric to the link.

mpls te metric value

By default, the link uses its IGP metric as the TE metric.

This command is available on every interface that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

Specifying the attribute usage preference for MPLS TE tunnel setup

About this task

The device can use the locally configured attributes or the attributes carried in Update or Initial messages received from a PCE to establish MPLS TE tunnels. This feature allows you to specify the attribute usage preference for establishing MPLS TE tunnels.

Usage guidelines

This feature takes effect on the following attributes: bandwidth, affinity, setup and holding priorities, explicit path, link metric type, TE metric of a link, and BSID. For other attributes, the device always uses the locally configured values.

This feature can be configured in both tunnel interface view and MPLS TE view. The configuration in MPLS TE view applies to all MPLS TE tunnels. The configuration in tunnel interface view applies only to the current MPLS TE tunnel. For an MPLS TE tunnel, the configuration in tunnel interface view has a higher priority than the configuration in MPLS TE view.

Configure the global attribute usage preference for MPLS TE tunnel setup

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls-te

3.     Specify the global attribute usage preference for establishing the MPLS TE tunnel.

tunnel-attribute prefer { local | pce }

By default, the device uses the attributes received from a PCE to establish MPLS TE tunnels.

Configure the attribute usage preference for an MPLS TE tunnel interface

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Configure the attribute usage preference for establishing the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te tunnel-attribute prefer { local | pce }

By default, the attribute usage preference configured in MPLS TE view applies.

Configuring route pinning

About this task

Perform this task on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel.

Restrictions and guidelines

When route pinning is enabled, you cannot configure MPLS TE tunnel reoptimization.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable route pinning.

mpls te route-pinning

By default, route pinning is disabled.

Configuring tunnel reoptimization

About this task

Perform this task on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel. This feature allows you to manually or dynamically trigger the ingress node to recalculate a path. If the ingress node recalculates a better path, it creates a new CRLSP, switches the traffic from the old CRLSP to the new CRLSP, and then deletes the old CRLSP.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable tunnel reoptimization.

mpls te reoptimization [ frequency seconds ]

By default, tunnel reoptimization is disabled.

4.     (Optional.) Immediately reoptimize all MPLS TE tunnels that are enabled with the tunnel reoptimization feature:

a.     Return to user view.

return

b.     Immediately reoptimize all MPLS TE tunnels that are enabled with the tunnel reoptimization feature.

mpls te reoptimization

Setting TE flooding thresholds and interval

About this task

This task is configurable on all nodes that the MPLS TE tunnel traverses.

When the bandwidth of an MPLS TE link changes, IGP floods the new bandwidth information, so the ingress node can use CSPF to recalculate the path.

To prevent such recalculations from consuming too many resources, you can configure IGP to flood only significant bandwidth changes by setting the following flooding thresholds:

·     Up threshold—When the percentage of the reservable-bandwidth increase to the maximum reservable bandwidth reaches the threshold, IGP floods the TE information.

·     Down threshold—When the percentage of the reservable-bandwidth decrease to the maximum reservable bandwidth reaches the threshold, IGP floods the TE information.

You can also set the flooding interval at which bandwidth changes that cannot trigger immediate flooding are flooded.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Set the bandwidth up/down threshold for the IGP to flood TE information.

mpls te bandwidth change thresholds { down | up } percent

By default, the up/down threshold is 10% of the link reservable bandwidth.

4.     Return to system view.

quit

5.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

6.     Set the flooding interval.

link-management periodic-flooding timer interval

By default, the flooding interval is 180 seconds.

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic to the new CRLSP

About this task

The CRLSP switching delay time refers to the time that MPLS TE must wait before it switches traffic from the old CRLSP to the new CRLSP.

When the upstream is idle but the downstream is busy, the new CRLSP might not be able to come up on every LSR within the switching delay time. If the upstream switches traffic to the new CRLSP but the CRLSP is not up at the downstream, traffic forwarding is interrupted.

To prevent this problem, perform this task to tune the switching delay time. A proper switching delay time ensures that the new CRLSP has enough time to come up on the entire path before traffic is switched to it.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Set the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic to the new CRLSP.

switch-delay time-value

By default, MPLS TE must wait 10000 milliseconds before switching the traffic to the new CRLSP.

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before deleting the old CRLSP

About this task

After the new CRLSP is established, MPLS TE must wait a period of time (called the CRLSP deletion delay time) before it deletes the old CRLSP. If the new CRLSP fails during the delay time, the old CRLSP will not be deleted, so that the traffic can be switched back to the old CRLSP.

MPLS TE uses a PathErr message to report the failure of the new CRLSP from downstream to upstream. The message might not be able to reach the upstream nodes before the old CRLSP is deleted because the downstream nodes are too busy to deliver it.

To prevent this problem, perform this task to tune the CRLSP deletion delay time. A proper deletion delay time ensures enough time for the new CRLSP's failure to be reported before the old CRLSP is deleted.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Set the time that MPLS TE must wait before deleting the old CRLSP.

delete-delay time-value

By default, MPLS TE must wait 10000 milliseconds before deleting the old CRLSP.

Controlling MPLS TE tunnel setup

About MPLS TE tunnel setup control

Perform the tasks on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel.

Restrictions and guidelines for MPLS TE tunnel setup control

When you perform the tasks, be aware of each configuration objective and its impact on your device.

Enabling loop detection

About this task

Enabling loop detection also enables the route recording feature, regardless of whether you have configured the mpls te record-route command. Loop detection enables each node of the tunnel to detect whether a loop has occurred according to the recorded route information.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable loop detection.

mpls te loop-detection

By default, loop detection is disabled.

Enabling route and label recording

About this task

Perform this task to record the nodes that an MPLS TE tunnel traverses and the label assigned by each node. The recorded information helps you know about the path used by the MPLS TE tunnel and the label distribution information, and when the tunnel fails, it helps you locate the fault.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Record routes or record both routes and labels.

¡     Record routes.

mpls te record-route

¡     Record both routes and labels.

mpls te record-route label

By default, both route recording and label recording are disabled.

Setting tunnel setup retry

About this task

If the ingress node fails to establish an MPLS TE tunnel, it waits for the retry interval, and then tries to set up the tunnel again. It repeats this process until the tunnel is established or until the number of attempts reaches the maximum. If the tunnel cannot be established when the number of attempts reaches the maximum, the ingress waits for a longer period and then repeats the previous process.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Set the maximum number of tunnel setup attempts.

mpls te retry retries

By default, the maximum number of attempts is 3.

4.     Set the retry interval.

mpls te timer retry seconds

By default, the retry interval is 2 seconds.

Configuring RSVP resource reservation style

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Configure the resources reservation style for the tunnel.

mpls te resv-style { ff | se }

By default, the resource reservation style is SE.

In current MPLS TE applications, tunnels are established usually by using the make-before-break mechanism. As a best practice, use the SE style.

Configuring path verification

About this task

The path verification feature examines the label and route mapping for an SRLSP. If the configured label has been occupied or the corresponding route does not exist, the system sets the SRLSP's state to down to avoid traffic forwarding failure.

The following path verification configuration modes are available:

·     Global path verification—The system examines label and route mappings for all SRLSPs.

·     Path verification for an MPLS TE tunnel—The system examines the label and route mapping for the SRLSP used by the tunnel .

In the current software version, only MPLS TE tunnels that use explicit-path SRLSPs support this feature.

Enabling global path verification

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Enable global path verification.

path verification enable

By default, global path verification is enabled.

Configring path verification for an MPLS TE tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Configure path verification for the tunnel.

mpls te path verification { enable | disable }

By default, the path verification configuration for an MPLS TE tunnel is the same as the global path verification configuration.

Configuring an MPLS TE tunnel to use a CRLSP calculated by PCEs

Configuring a PCE

About this task

An LSR acts as a PCC if no PCE IP address is specified for it. It uses its LSR ID to communicate with PCEs. To configure the LSR as a PCE, perform this task.

Restrictions and guidelines

If the device cannot act as both a PCE and a stateful PCC, do not execute both the pcep type command and the pce address command on the device.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Configure a PCE IP address.

pce address ip-address

By default, no PCE address is configured.

4.     (Optional.) Enable the SR capability for the PCE device.

pce capability segment-routing

By default, a PCE device does not have the SR capability.

To establish an SR-capable stateful PCEP session, you need to enable the SR capability on both peers of the PCEP session.

Discovering PCEs

 

About this task

A PCE can be manually specified on a PCC by using the pce static command or automatically discovered through the PCE information advertised by OSPF TE. A PCC sends PCEP connection requests to discovered PCEs but does not accept requests from the PCEs.

Manually specifying a PCE

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Specify the IP address of the PCE.

pce static ip-address

Dynamically discovering PCEs

OSPF TE advertises PCE IP addresses for PCCs and other PCEs to dynamically discover the PCEs and establish PCEP sessions to them. For OSPF TE configuration, see "Configuring OSPF TE."

Establishing a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs

About this task

If you configure the mpls te path command for an LSR, it uses the path calculated by PCEs to establish a CRLSP. The LSR acts as a PCC.

If you specify PCE addresses by using the mpls te path or mpls te backup-path command, the LSR establishes PCEP sessions to the specified PCEs. If you do not specify any PCE addresses, the LSR establishes PCEP sessions to all discovered PCEs.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Establish a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs.

mpls te path preference value dynamic pce [ ip-address ]&<0-8>

By default, the automatically calculated path is used to establish a CRLSP.

Configuring stateful PCEP

About this task

For a PCC and a PCE to establish a stateful PCEP session, you must specify the same device type (active stateful or passive stateful) for the two devices.

·     If they are configured as passive-stateful devices, the PCE knows all CRLSPs maintained by the PCC but does not accept delegation requests sent by the PCC.

·     If they are configured as active-stateful devices, the PCC can delegate CRLSPs to the PCE. If multiple PCEs are available for CRLSP delegation in the network, the PCC chooses the PCE with the highest delegation priority.

If a PCEP session between a PCC and a PCE terminates, the PCC waits for the redelegation timeout interval before it redelegates the CRLSP.

·     If the PCEP session is re-established within the redelegation timeout interval, the PCC redelegates the CRLSP to the PCE.

·     If the PCEP session fails to be re-established within the interval, the PCC redelegates the CRLSP to another PCE that has a lower delegation priority.

If the redelegation fails and the CRLSP state timeout expires, the PCC uses the path calculated locally to establish the CRLSP.

If an ingress needs to delegate only part of its CRLSPs to the PCE, the PCE does not have complete CRLSP information to calculate global bandwidth information. In this case, you can configure the ingress to report information about the undelegated CRLSPs to the PCE without delegating the CRLSPs to the PCE.

If Segment Routing (SR) is used to establish a tunnel, the PCC delegates the SRLSP to the SR-capable PCE, and establishes the SRLSP by using the update messages sent by the PCE.

Restrictions and guidelines

The CRLSP state timeout interval must be greater than or equal to the redelegation timeout interval.

To use SR to establish a tunnel, you must enable the SR capability on the active stateful PCEP devices (by using the pce capability segment-routing command).

If you configure both the mpls te passive-delegate report-only and mpls te delegation commands for a tunnel, the mpls te passive-delegate report-only command takes effect.

Enabling delegation

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Configure the PCEP device type as active stateful or passive stateful.

pcep type { active-stateful | passive-stateful }

By default, the PCEP device type is stateless.

4.     Enable the SR capability of the PCEP device.

pce capability segment-routing

By default, the device does not have the SR capability.

To establish an SR-capable stateful PCEP session, enable the SR capability on both peers of the session.

5.     Enable the multi-delegation feature on the PCC to delegate CRLSPs and SRLSPs to all PCEs.

pce multi-delegate enable

By default, the multi-delegation feature is disabled.

6.     Return to system view.

quit

7.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

8.     Enable CRLSP/SRLSP delegation.

mpls te delegation

By default, CRLSP/SRLSP delegation is disabled.

9.     (Optional.) Configure the PCC to report CRLSP information to the PCE without delegating the CRLSP to the PCE.

mpls te passive-delegate report-only

By default, this feature is disabled.

10.     (Optional.) Configure MPLS TE to use SR and stateful PCE to establish the tunnel.

mpls te signaling segment-routing

By default, MPLS TE uses RSVP-TE to establish a tunnel.

Execute this command to configure CRLSP delegation that supports SR.

Configuring delegation parameters

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Configure the PCEP device type as active stateful or passive stateful.

pcep type { active-stateful | passive-stateful }

By default, the PCEP device type is stateless.

4.     Set the delegation priority of a PCE.

pce peer ip-address delegation-priority priority

By default, the delegation priority of a PCE is 65535.

A smaller value represents a higher priority.

5.     (Optional.) Set the redelegation timeout interval.

pce redelegation-timeout value

By default, the redelegation timeout interval is 30 seconds.

6.     (Optional.) Set the state timeout interval on the PCC.

pce state-timeout value

By default, the state timeout interval is 60 seconds.

7.     Enable the SR capability.

pce capability segment-routing

By default, the device does not have the SR capability.

To establish an SR-capable stateful PCEP session, enable the SR capability on both peers of the session.

8.     (Optional.) Configure the PCC to retain PCE-updated LSP states.

pce retain lsp-state

By default, a PCC restores the original LSP states when the state timeout interval expires.

9.     (Optional.) Configure the PCC to retain PCE-initiated LSPs.

pce retain initiated-lsp

By default, a PCC deletes PCE-initiated LSPs when the state timeout interval expires.

Configuring PCEP session parameters

About this task

This task allows you to configure parameters for PCCs or PCEs to establish PCEP sessions to manually specified or dynamically discovered PCEs.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Set the path calculation request timeout time.

pce request-timeout value

By default, the request timeout time is 10 seconds.

4.     Set the PCEP session deadtimer.

pce deadtimer value

By default, the PCEP session deadtimer is 120 seconds.

5.     Set the keepalive interval for PCEP sessions.

pce keepalive interval

By default, the keepalive interval is 30 seconds.

6.     Set the minimum acceptable keepalive interval and the maximum number of allowed unknown messages received from the peer.

pce tolerance { min-keepalive value | max-unknown-messages value }

By default, the minimum acceptable keepalive interval is 10 seconds, and the maximum number of allowed unknown messages in a minute is 5.

7.     Configure PCEP session authentication for a peer.

pce peer ip-address keychain keychain-name

By default, PCEP session authentication is not configured.

For two devices to establish a PCEP session, you must configure the same keychain authentication settings on both devices.

For more information about keychains, see keychain configuration in Security Configuration Guide.

Configuring unequal load sharing for an MPLS TE tunnel

Configuring tunnel bundle interface-based unequal load sharing

About this task

Tunnel bundle interface-based unequal load sharing specifies multiple member interfaces (MPLS TE tunnel interfaces) for a tunnel bundle interface in load sharing mode. The member interfaces form an MPLS TE tunnel bundle. Outgoing traffic on the tunnel bundle interface is shared on the member interfaces in proportion of their weights.

For example, a tunnel bundle interface has three member interfaces. The weights for the member interfaces are 1, 1, and 2, respectively. The proportions of traffic forwarded by the member interfaces are 1/4, 1/4, and 1/2, respectively. If you configure the weights as 2, 2, and 4 for the member interfaces, the traffic forwarding proportions of the member interfaces are still 1/4, 1/4, and 1/2.

Perform this task on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel.

Restrictions and guidelines

As a best practice, configure the same destination address for a tunnel bundle interface and its member interfaces. Otherwise, traffic cannot be forwarded unless the tunnel bundle interface's destination address can be reached through the member interfaces.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a tunnel bundle interface and enter tunnel bundle interface view.

interface tunnel-bundle number

3.     Configure an IP address for the tunnel bundle interface.

ip address ip-address { mask-length | mask }

By default, no IP address is configured for a tunnel bundle interface.

4.     Configure the destination address for the tunnel bundle interface.

destination ip-address

By default, no destination address is configured for a tunnel bundle interface.

5.     Specify a member interface for the tunnel bundle interface.

member interface tunnel tunnel-number [ load-share value ]

By default, no member interface is configured for a tunnel bundle interface.

You can execute this command multiple times to specify more member interfaces.

Configuring tunnel interface-based unequal load sharing

About this task

Tunnel interface-based unequal load sharing assigns bandwidth to multiple equal-cost MPLS TE tunnels that have the same destination. Traffic to that destination is shared over the tunnels in proportion of their bandwidths.

For example, Tunnel 1, Tunnel 2, and Tunnel 3 are three equal-cost MPLS TE tunnels destined for the same address. The bandwidths of Tunnel 1, Tunnel 2, and Tunnel 3 are 10000 kbps, 10000 kbps, and 20000 kbps, respectively. The proportions of traffic forwarded over the tunnels are 1/4, 1/4, and 1/2, respectively. If you change the bandwidths of the tunnels to 1 kbps, 1 kbps, and 2 kbps, the traffic forwarding proportions of the tunnels are still 1/4, 1/4, and 1/2.

Perform this task on the ingress node of an MPLS TE tunnel.

Restrictions and guidelines

When adjacency forwarding is enabled, bandwidth assigned by the mpls te load-share command participates in IGP link cost calculation. As a result, the IGP link costs of the MPLS TE tunnels for unequal load sharing might be different. In this case, tune the IGP costs of the tunnels with the ospf cost or isis cost command to ensure that their IGP link costs are equal. For information about the ospf cost and isis cost commands, see Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Assign bandwidth to the MPLS TE tunnel for unequal load sharing.

mpls te load-share value

By default, no bandwidth is assigned to an MPLS TE tunnel for unequal load sharing. The proportion of traffic forwarded over the MPLS TE tunnel is based on the bandwidth assigned by the mpls te bandwidth command.

Configuring traffic forwarding

Configuring static routing to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

Creating a static route to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel/tunnel bundle

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Configure a static route to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel.

ip route-static { dest-address { mask-length | mask } | group group-name } { interface-type interface-number [ next-hop-address ] [ backup-interface interface-type interface-number [ backup-nexthop backup-nexthop-address ] [ permanent ] | bfd { control-packet | echo-packet } | permanent | track track-entry-number ] | next-hop-address [ bfd control-packet bfd-source ip-address | permanent | track track-entry-number ] | vpn-instance d-vpn-instance-name next-hop-address [ bfd control-packet bfd-source ip-address | permanent | track track-entry-number ] } [ preference preference ] [ tag tag-value ] [ description text ]

The interface specified in this command can be an MPLS TE tunnel interface or an MPLS TE tunnel bundle interface.

For more information about this command, see static routing commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Configuring automatic static route advertisement to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Configure automatic static route advertisement.

tunnel route-static [ preference preference-value ]

By default, automatic static route advertisement is not configured.

This command creates a static route whose destination address and output interface are the tunnel destination address and the tunnel interface, respectively.

Configuring PBR to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

About this task

For more information about the commands in this task, see policy-based routing commands in Layer 3—IP Routing Command Reference.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a PBR policy node and enter policy node view.

policy-based-route policy-name [ deny | permit ] node node-number

3.     Configure an ACL match criterion.

if-match acl { acl-number | name acl-name }

By default, no ACL match criterion is configured.

4.     Specify a tunnel interface or a tunnel bundle interface as the packet output interface.

apply output-interface { tunnel tunnel-number | tunnel-bundle number } [ track track-entry-number ]

5.     Return to system view.

quit

6.     Apply the PBR policy.

Choose one option as needed:

¡     Apply the policy to the local device.

ip local policy-based-route policy-name

¡     Execute the following commands in sequence to apply the policy to an interface:

interface interface-type interface-number

ip policy-based-route policy-name

By default, no policy is applied.

Configuring automatic route advertisement to direct traffic to an MPLS TE tunnel

Restrictions and guidelines for automatic route advertisement

The destination address of the MPLS TE tunnel can be the LSR ID of the egress node or the primary IP address of an interface on the egress node. As a best practice, configure the destination address of the MPLS TE tunnel as the LSR ID of the egress node.

If you configure the tunnel destination address as the primary IP address of an interface on the egress node, you must enable MPLS TE, and configure OSPF or IS-IS on that interface. This makes sure the primary IP address of the interface can be advertised to its peer.

The route to the tunnel interface address (or the tunnel bundle interface address) and the route to the tunnel destination must be in the same OSPF area or at the same IS-IS level.

To use forwarding adjacency, you must establish two MPLS TE tunnels in opposite directions between two nodes, and configure forwarding adjacency on both the nodes.

MPLS TE tunnels that consist of SRLSPs do not support forwarding adjacency.

Prerequisites for automatic route advertisement

Before configuring automatic route advertisement, perform the following tasks:

·     Enable OSPF or IS-IS on the tunnel interface or tunnel bundle interface to advertise the interface address to OSPF or IS-IS.

·     Enable MPLS TE for an OSPF area or an IS-IS process by executing the mpls te enable command in OSPF area view or IS-IS view.

Configuring IGP shortcut

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

¡     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

¡     Enter MPLS TE tunnel bundle interface view.

interface tunnel-bundle number

3.     Enable IGP shortcut.

mpls te igp shortcut [ isis | ospf ]

By default, IGP shortcut is disabled.

If no IGP is specified, both OSPF and IS-IS will include the MPLS TE tunnel or tunnel bundle in route calculation.

4.     Assign a metric to the MPLS TE tunnel or tunnel bundle.

mpls te igp metric { absolute value | relative value }

By default, the metric of an MPLS TE tunnel or tunnel bundle equals its IGP metric.

 

Metric type

Metric of the MPLS TE tunnel or tunnel bundle

Absolute metric

Equals the absolute metric.

Relative metric

Equals the relative metric plus the IGP metric of the tunnel or tunnel bundle.

 

Configuring forwarding adjacency in tunnel interface view

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable forwarding adjacency.

mpls te igp advertise [ hold-time value ]

By default, forwarding adjacency is disabled.

Configuring forwarding adjacency in tunnel bundle interface view

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel bundle interface view.

interface tunnel-bundle number

3.     Enable forwarding adjacency.

mpls te igp advertise

By default, forwarding adjacency is disabled.

Configuring CRLSP/SRLSP backup

About CRLSP/SRLSP backup

This feature provides end-to-end CRLSP/SRLSP protection for an MPLS TE tunnel.

Restrictions and guidelines for CRLSP/SRLSP backup

Static CRLSPs or SRLSPs do not support the backup feature.

SRLSPs support only the hot-standby backup mode.

Enabling CRLSP/SRLSP backup for an MPLS TE tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable tunnel backup and specify the backup mode.

mpls te backup { hot-standby [ wtr delay-time ] | ordinary }

By default, tunnel backup is disabled.

MPLS TE tunnels that use SRLSPs do not support the ordinary keyword.

Configuring the backup path setup mode

Restrictions and guidelines

The primary path and backup paths of a tunnel can be established in different modes.

If both the primary and backup paths are automatically calculated, make sure there are at least two paths to reach the tunnel destination. Otherwise, the backup CRLSP/SRLSP cannot be used.

When you use the mpls te path preference command to establish an SRLSP, do not specify both the dynamic and no-cspf keyword.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Specify the backup path setup mode. Choose one option as needed:

¡     Specify the back path and set the preference of the path.

mpls te backup-path preference value { dynamic [ pce [ ip-address ]&<0-8> ] | explicit-path path-name } [ no-cspf ]

By default, the automatically calculated path is used to establish a backup CRLSP/SRLSP.

If you specify the PCE option, the device acts as a PCC and establishes PCEP sessions to the specified PCEs. The PCC uses the paths computed by the PCEs to establish backup CRLSPs or SRLSPs.

¡     Enable LSP delegation to a PCE to establish backup SRLSPs or CRLSPs.

mpls te delegation

By default, CRLSP/SRLSP delegation is disabled.

Configuring CSPF to include the SRLG constraint in backup path compuation

About this task

If the SRLG constraint is included in path computation, CSPF excludes all links with interfaces which belong to the same SRLG as the protected interface.

Restrictions and guidelines

Only SRLSPs support this feature.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Configure CSPF to include the SRLG constraint in the computation of a backup path.

backup-path exclude-srlg [ preferred ]

By default, CSPF does not include the SRLG constraint in the computation of a backup path.

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic back to the primary path

About this task

When the primary path recovers, MPLS TE must wait a period of time before switching the traffic back to the primary path. This task allows you to tune the delay time.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Set the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic back to the primary path.

switch-delay time-value

By default, MPLS TE must wait 10000 milliseconds before switching the traffic back to the primary path.

Configuring MPLS TE FRR

Restrictions and guidelines for MPLS TE FRR

MPLS TE FRR provides temporary link or node protection on a CRLSP. When you configure FRR, follow these restrictions and guidelines:

·     Do not configure both FRR and RSVP authentication on the same interface.

·     Only MPLS TE tunnels established through RSVP-TE support FRR.

·      

Enabling FRR

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter tunnel interface view of the primary CRLSP.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable FRR.

mpls te fast-reroute

By default, FRR is disabled.

Configuring a bypass tunnel on the PLR

About this task

To configure FRR, you must configure bypass tunnels for primary CRLSPs on the PLR by using the following method:

Manually configuring a bypass tunnel on the PLR—Create an MPLS TE tunnel on the PLR, and configure the tunnel as a bypass tunnel for a primary CRLSP. You need to bind the bypass tunnel to the output interface of the primary CRLSP.

A primary tunnel can have multiple manually configured bypass tunnels. The PLR will select one bypass tunnel to protect the primary CRLSP. The selected bypass tunnel is bound to the primary CRLSP.

Among manually created bypass tunnels, the PLR selects the bypass tunnel for protecting the primary CRLSP by following these rules:

1.     Selects a bypass tunnel according to the bandwidth required by the primary CRLSP.

2.     Prefers the bypass tunnel in node protection mode over the one in link protection mode.

3.     Prefers the bypass tunnel with a smaller ID over the one with a bigger tunnel ID.

Configuration restrictions and guidelines

When you configure a bypass tunnel, follow these principles to protect and assign bandwidth:

·     Use bypass tunnels to protect only critical interfaces or links when bandwidth is insufficient. Bypass tunnels are pre-established and require extra bandwidth.

·     Make sure the bandwidth assigned to the bypass tunnel is no less than the total bandwidth needed by all primary CRLSPs to be protected by the bypass tunnel. Otherwise, some primary CRLSPs might not be protected by the bypass tunnel.

·     A bypass tunnel typically does not forward data when the primary CRLSP operates correctly. For a bypass tunnel to also forward data during tunnel protection, you must assign adequate bandwidth to the bypass tunnel.

A bypass tunnel has the following restrictions:

·     The bypass tunnel cannot be used for services such as VPN.

·     FRR cannot be configured for the bypass tunnel. A bypass tunnel cannot act as a primary CRLSP.

·     The bypass tunnel must not traverse the protected node or interface.

Manually configuring a bypass tunnel

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Create a bypass tunnel.

The bypass tunnel setup method is the same as a normal MPLS TE tunnel. For more information, see "Establishing a static CRLSP", "Establishing a CRLSP dynamically", and "Establishing a CRLSP by using the path calculated by PCEs."

3.     Enter tunnel interface view of the bypass tunnel.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

4.     Specify the destination address of the bypass tunnel.

destination ip-address

The bypass tunnel destination address is the LSR ID of the MP.

5.     Configure the bypass tunnel to protect traffic of all CTs without constraining the bandwidth to be protected.

mpls te backup bandwidth un-limited

By default, the bandwidth and the CT to be protected by the bypass tunnel are not specified.

To successfully associate a primary CRLSP with a bypass tunnel, you must execute this command.

6.     Return to system view.

quit

7.     Enter interface view of the output interface of a primary CRLSP.

interface interface-type interface-number

8.     Specify a bypass tunnel for the protected interface.

mpls te fast-reroute bypass-tunnel tunnel tunnel-number

By default, no bypass tunnel is specified for an interface.

Setting the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic back to the primary CRLSP

About this task

When the primary CRLSP recovers, MPLS TE must wait a period of time before switching the traffic back to the primary CRLSP. This task allows you to tune the delay time.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Set the time that MPLS TE must wait before switching the traffic back to the primary CRLSP.

switch-delay time-value

By default, MPLS TE must wait 10000 milliseconds before switching the traffic back to the primary CRLSP.

Configuring node fault detection

 

About this task

You can configure this feature for FRR node protection. FRR link protection does not need this configuration.

This feature uses the RSVP hello mechanism or BFD on the PLR and the protected node to detect the node faults caused by signaling protocol faults. To detect the node faults caused by the link faults between the PLR and the protected node, you do not need to configure this feature.

Enabling BFD for link status detection

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter the view of the interface that is connected to the PLR or protected node.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Enable BFD for link status detection.

rsvp bfd enable

By default, BFD is not enabled for RSVP link status detection.

For more information about the rsvp bfd enable command, see "Configuring RSVP."

Configuring interface-based hello detection

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Enable RSVP hello on the interface.

rsvp hello enable

By default, RSVP hello is disabled on an interface.

For more information about the rsvp hello enable command, see "Configuring RSVP."

Configuring LSR ID-based hello detection

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

3.     Create an RSVP hello neighbor.

hello node-session lsr-id

To establish an RSVP hello neighbor relationship, you must execute this command on both the local and peer devices.

You can use this command to establish an RSVP hello neighbor relationship between two indirectly connected nodes.

For more information about the hello node-session command, see "Configuring RSVP."

Setting the optimal bypass tunnel selection interval

About this task

If you have specified multiple bypass tunnels for a primary CRLSP, MPLS TE selects an optimal bypass tunnel to protect the primary CRLSP. Sometimes, a bypass tunnel might become better than the current optimal bypass tunnel because, for example, the reservable bandwidth changes. You can perform this task to set the interval at which MPLS TE polls the bypass tunnels to update the optimal bypass tunnel.

Perform this task on the PLR.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE view.

mpls te

3.     Set the interval for selecting an optimal bypass tunnel.

fast-reroute timer interval

By default, the interval is 300 seconds.

Configuring CBTS

Restrictions and guidelines

When you use QoS to define traffic classes for marking MPLS TE service classes, you can create traffic classes to match only the DSCP value in packets.

Prerequisites

Before configuring CBTS, you must create QoS traffic behaviors to mark the MPLS TE service class values for packets. For more information, see QoS configuration in ACL and QoS Configuration Guide.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Set a service class value for the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te service-class service-class-value

By default, no service class value is set for an MPLS TE tunnel.

Configuring MPLS TE tunnel statistics

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter MPLS TE tunnel interface view.

interface tunnel tunnel-number [ mode mpls-te ]

3.     Enable traffic statistics for the MPLS TE tunnel.

mpls te statistics

By default, MPLS TE tunnel traffic statistics is disabled.

Enabling SNMP notifications for MPLS TE

About this task

This feature enables generating SNMP notifications for MPLS TE upon MPLS TE state changes, as defined in RFC 3812. For MPLS TE event notifications to be sent correctly, you must also configure SNMP on the device. For more information about SNMP configuration, see the network management and monitoring configuration guide for the device.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable SNMP notifications for MPLS TE.

snmp-agent trap enable te

By default, SNMP notifications for MPLS TE are disabled.

Display and maintenance commands for MPLS TE

Execute display commands in any view and reset commands in user view.

 

Task

Command

Display information about explicit paths.

display explicit-path [ path-name ]

Display MPLS TE tunnel and BSID associations.

display mpls te binding-sid [ label label-value ]

Display information about explicit paths that use BSIDs.

display mpls te binding-sid ref-list [ label label-value ]

Display link and node information in an IS-IS TEDB.

display isis mpls te advertisement [ [ level-1 | level-2 ] | [ originate-system system-id | local ] | verbose ] * [ process-id ]

Display sub-TLV information for IS-IS TE.

display isis mpls te configured-sub-tlvs [ process-id ]

Display network information in an IS-IS TEDB.

display isis mpls te network [ [ level-1 | level-2 ] | local | lsp-id lsp-id ]* [ process-id ]

Display IS-IS tunnel interface information.

display isis mpls te tunnel [ level-1 | level-2 ] [ process-id ]

Display MPLS TE tunnel traffic statistics.

display mpls statistics tunnel-interface number

Display DS-TE information.

display mpls te ds-te

Display bandwidth information on MPLS TE-enabled interfaces.

display mpls te link-management bandwidth-allocation [ interface interface-type interface-number ]

Display SRLGs of interfaces.

display mpls te link-management srlg [ interface interface-type interface-number ]

Display information about discovered PCEs.

display mpls te pce discovery [ ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Display CRLSP and SRLSP information in a PCE LSPDB.

display mpls te pce lspdb [ plsp-id plsp-id ] [ verbose ]

Display local PCEP session settings.

display mpls te pce parameter

Display PCC and PCE peer information.

display mpls te pce peer [ ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Display information about stateful PCE peers on a PCC.

display mpls te pce stateful neighbor [ ip-address ]

Display PCC and PCE statistics.

display mpls te pce statistics [ ip-address ]

Display the path information of SR-signaled MPLS TE tunnels.

display mpls te segment-routing tunnel path [ tunnel number ]

Display information about SRLGs.

display mpls te srlg [ srlg-number ]

Display MPLS TEDB information.

display mpls te tedb { { isis { level-1 | level-2 } | ospf area area-id } | link ip-address | network | node [ local | mpls-lsr-id ] | summary }

Display information about MPLS TE tunnel interfaces.

display mpls te tunnel-interface [ tunnel number ]

Display link and node information in an OSPF TEDB.

display ospf [ process-id ] [ area area-id ] mpls te advertisement [ originate-router advertising-router-id | self-originate ]

Display network information in an OSPF TEDB.

display ospf [ process-id ] [ area area-id ] mpls te network [ originate-router advertising-router-id | self-originate ]

Display information about PCEs discovered by OSPF.

display ospf [ process-id ] [ area area-id ] mpls te pce [ originate-router advertising-router-id | self-originate ]

Display OSPF tunnel interface information.

display ospf [ process-id ] [ area area-id ] mpls te tunnel

Display information about tunnel bundle interfaces and their member interfaces.

display tunnel-bundle [ number ]

Clear MPLS TE tunnel traffic statistics.

reset mpls statistics tunnel-interface number

Clear PCC and PCE statistics.

reset mpls te pce statistics [ ip-address ]

MPLS TE configuration examples

Example: Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel over a static CRLSP

Network configuration

Router A, Router B, and Router C run IS-IS.

Establish an MPLS TE tunnel over a static CRLSP from Router A to Router C to transmit data between the two IP networks.

The MPLS TE tunnel requires a bandwidth of 2000 kbps. The maximum bandwidth of the link that the tunnel traverses is 10000 kbps. The maximum reservable bandwidth of the link is 5000 kbps.

Figure 9 Network diagram

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] isis 1

[RouterA-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0001.00

[RouterA-isis-1] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterA] interface loopback 0

[RouterA-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterA-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router B.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] isis 1

[RouterB-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0002.00

[RouterB-isis-1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis enable 1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

[RouterB] interface loopback 0

[RouterB-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterB-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router C.

<RouterC> system-view

[RouterC] isis 1

[RouterC-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0003.00

[RouterC-isis-1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface loopback 0

[RouterC-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterC-LoopBack0] quit

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on each router to verify that the routers have learned the routes to one another, including the routes to the loopback interfaces. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS and MPLS TE:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.1

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.2

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.3

[RouterC] mpls te

[RouterC-te] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

4.     Configure MPLS TE attributes of links:

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router A.

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router B.

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router C.

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

5.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel on Router A:

# Configure MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 0.

[RouterA] interface tunnel 0 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel0] ip address 6.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router C.

[RouterA-Tunnel0] destination 3.3.3.3

# Configure MPLS TE to use a static CRLSP to establish the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel0] mpls te signaling static

[RouterA-Tunnel0] quit

6.     Create a static CRLSP:

# Configure Router A as the ingress node of the static CRLSP, and specify the next hop address as 2.1.1.2, outgoing label as 20, and bandwidth for the tunnel as 2000 kbps.

[RouterA] static-cr-lsp ingress static-cr-lsp-1 nexthop 2.1.1.2 out-label 20 bandwidth 2000

# On Router A, configure Tunnel 0 to use static CRLSP static-cr-lsp-1.

[RouterA] interface tunnel0

[RouterA-Tunnel0] mpls te static-cr-lsp static-cr-lsp-1

[RouterA-Tunnel0] quit

# Configure Router B as the transit node of the static CRLSP, and specify the incoming label as 20, next hop address as 3.2.1.2, outgoing label as 30, and bandwidth for the tunnel as 2000 kbps.

[RouterB] static-cr-lsp transit static-cr-lsp-1 in-label 20 nexthop 3.2.1.2 out-label 30 bandwidth 2000

# Configure Router C as the egress node of the static CRLSP, and specify the incoming label as 30.

[RouterC] static-cr-lsp egress static-cr-lsp-1 in-label 30

7.     Configure a static route on Router A to direct traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to MPLS TE tunnel 0.

[RouterA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 0 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the tunnel interface is up on Router A.

[RouterA] display interface tunnel

Tunnel0

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel0 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1496

Internet address: 6.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 3.3.3.3

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Output queue - Urgent queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/100/0

Output queue - Protocol queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/500/0

Output queue - FIFO queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/75/0

Last clearing of counters: Never

Last 300 seconds input rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Last 300 seconds output rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

# Display detailed information about the MPLS TE tunnel on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 0

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 1               Tunnel ID            : 0

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.1         Egress LSR ID        : 3.3.3.3

  Signaling            : Static          Static CRLSP Name    : static-cr-lsp-1

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : -

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : -               Tunnel Bandwidth     : -

  Reserved Bandwidth   : -

  Setup Priority       : 0               Holding Priority     : 0

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : -/-

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : -               Record Label         : -

  FRR Flag             : -               Bandwidth Protection : -

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: -               Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : -               Auto Created         : -

  Route Pinning        : -

  Retry Limit          : 3               Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : -               Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : -               Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : -               Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

# Display static CRLSP information on each router.

[RouterA] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

1.1.1.1/0/1                 StaticCR -/20            HGE1/0/1

2.1.1.2                     Local    -/-             HGE1/0/1

Tunnel0                     Local    -/-             NHLFE1025

[RouterB] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

-                           StaticCR 20/30           HGE1/0/2

3.2.1.2                     Local    -/-             HGE1/0/2

[RouterC] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

-                           StaticCR 30/-            -

[RouterA] display mpls static-cr-lsp

Name            LSR Type    In/Out Label   Out Interface        State

static-cr-lsp-1 Ingress     Null/20        HGE1/0/1             Up

[RouterB] display mpls static-cr-lsp

Name            LSR Type    In/Out Label   Out Interface        State

static-cr-lsp-1 Transit     20/30          HGE1/0/2             Up

[RouterC] display mpls static-cr-lsp

Name            LSR Type    In/Out Label   Out Interface        State

static-cr-lsp-1 Egress      30/Null        -                    Up

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on Router A. The output shows a static route entry with interface Tunnel 0 as the output interface. (Details not shown.)

Example: Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel with RSVP-TE

Network configuration

Router A, Router B, Router C, and Router D run IS-IS and all of them are Level-2 routers.

Use RSVP-TE to establish an MPLS TE tunnel from Router A to Router D to transmit data between the two IP networks. The MPLS TE tunnel requires a bandwidth of 2000 kbps.

The maximum bandwidth of the link that the tunnel traverses is 10000 kbps and the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link is 5000 kbps.

Figure 10 Network diagram

Table 3 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Router A

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

Router C

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.2/24

Router B

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

Router D

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.2.1/24

 

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] isis 1

[RouterA-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0001.00

[RouterA-isis-1] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterA] interface loopback 0

[RouterA-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterA-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterA-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router B.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] isis 1

[RouterB-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0002.00

[RouterB-isis-1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis enable 1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

[RouterB] interface loopback 0

[RouterB-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterB-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterB-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router C.

<RouterC> system-view

[RouterC] isis 1

[RouterC-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0003.00

[RouterC-isis-1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis enable 1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

[RouterC] interface loopback 0

[RouterC-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterC-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterC-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router D.

<RouterD> system-view

[RouterD] isis 1

[RouterD-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0004.00

[RouterD-isis-1] quit

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterD] interface loopback 0

[RouterD-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterD-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterD-LoopBack0] quit

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on each router to verify that the routers have learned the routes to one another, including the routes to the loopback interfaces. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] rsvp

[RouterA-rsvp] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] quit

[RouterB] rsvp

[RouterB-rsvp] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[RouterC] mpls te

[RouterC-te] quit

[RouterC] rsvp

[RouterC-rsvp] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[RouterD] mpls te

[RouterD-te] quit

[RouterD] rsvp

[RouterD-rsvp] quit

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

4.     Configure IS-IS TE:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] isis 1

[RouterA-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterA-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterA-isis-1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] isis 1

[RouterB-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterB-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterB-isis-1] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] isis 1

[RouterC-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterC-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterC-isis-1] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] isis 1

[RouterD-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterD-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterD-isis-1] quit

5.     Configure MPLS TE attributes of links:

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router A.

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router B.

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router C.

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router D.

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

6.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel on Router A:

# Configure MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 1.

[RouterA] interface tunnel 1 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel1] ip address 7.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router D.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] destination 4.4.4.9

# Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Assign 2000 kbps bandwidth to the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te bandwidth 2000

[RouterA-Tunnel1] quit

7.     Configure a static route on Router A to direct the traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to MPLS TE tunnel 1.

[RouterA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 1 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the tunnel interface is up on Router A.

[RouterA] display interface tunnel

Tunnel1

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel1 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1496

Internet address: 7.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 4.4.4.9

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Last clearing of counters: Never

Last 300 seconds input: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Last 300 seconds output: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

# Display detailed information about the MPLS TE tunnel on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 1

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up, Shared-resource CRLSP down)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 23331           Tunnel ID            : 1

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.9         Egress LSR ID        : 4.4.4.9

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : SE

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : CT0             Tunnel Bandwidth     : 2000 kbps

  Reserved Bandwidth   : 2000 kbps

  Setup Priority       : 7               Holding Priority     : 7

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : 0/0

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : Disabled        Record Label         : Disabled

  FRR Flag             : Disabled        Bandwidth Protection : Disabled

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: Disabled        Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : No              Auto Created         : No

  Route Pinning        : Disabled

  Retry Limit          : 10              Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : Disabled        Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : None            Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : Disabled        Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on Router A. The output shows a static route entry with interface Tunnel 1 as the output interface. (Details not shown.)

Example: Establishing an inter-AS MPLS TE tunnel with RSVP-TE

Network configuration

Router A and Router B are in AS 100. Router C and Router D are in AS 200. AS 100 and AS 200 use OSPF as the IGP.

Establish an EBGP connection between ASBRs Router B and Router C. Redistribute BGP routes into OSPF and OSPF routes into BGP, so that AS 100 and AS 200 can reach each other.

Use RSVP-TE to establish an MPLS TE tunnel from Router A to Router D to transmit data between the two IP networks. The tunnel requires a bandwidth of 2000 kbps. The maximum bandwidth of the link that the tunnel traverses is 10000 kbps, and the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link is 5000 kbps.

Figure 11 Network diagram

Table 4 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Router A

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

Router C

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.1.0/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.2/24

Router B

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

Router D

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.2.0/24

 

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure OSPF to advertise routes within the ASs, and redistribute the direct and BGP routes into OSPF on Router B and Router C:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] ospf

[RouterA-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterA-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router B.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] ospf

[RouterB-ospf-1] import-route direct

[RouterB-ospf-1] import-route bgp

[RouterB-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterB-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router C.

<RouterC> system-view

[RouterC] ospf

[RouterC-ospf-1] import-route direct

[RouterC-ospf-1] import-route bgp

[RouterC-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 30.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterC-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router D.

<RouterD> system-view

[RouterD] ospf

[RouterD-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 30.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 4.4.4.9 0.0.0.0

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterD-ospf-1] quit

# Verify that the routers have learned the routes to one another, including the routes to the loopback interfaces. This example uses Router A.

[RouterA] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 6        Routes : 6

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

1.1.1.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.2.2.9/32         O_INTRA 10  1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.     Configure BGP on Router B and Router C to ensure that the ASs can communicate with each other:

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] bgp 100

[RouterB-bgp] peer 20.1.1.2 as-number 200

[RouterB-bgp] address-family ipv4 unicast

[RouterB-bgp-ipv4] peer 20.1.1.2 enable

[RouterB-bgp-ipv4] import-route ospf

[RouterB-bgp-ipv4] import-route direct

[RouterB-bgp-ipv4] quit

[RouterB-bgp] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] bgp 200

[RouterC-bgp] peer 20.1.1.1 as-number 100

[RouterC-bgp] address-family ipv4 unicast

[RouterC-bgp-ipv4] peer 20.1.1.1 enable

[RouterC-bgp-ipv4] import-route ospf

[RouterC-bgp-ipv4] import-route direct

[RouterC-bgp-ipv4] quit

[RouterC-bgp] quit

# Verify that the routers have learned the AS-external routes. This example uses Router A.

[RouterA] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 10       Routes : 10

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

1.1.1.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.2.2.9/32         O_INTRA 10  1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

3.3.3.9/32         O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

4.4.4.9/32         O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

20.1.1.0/24        O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.0/24        O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

4.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] rsvp

[RouterA-rsvp] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] quit

[RouterB] rsvp

[RouterB-rsvp] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[RouterC] mpls te

[RouterC-te] quit

[RouterC] rsvp

[RouterC-rsvp] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[RouterD] mpls te

[RouterD-te] quit

[RouterD] rsvp

[RouterD-rsvp] quit

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

5.     Configure OSPF TE:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] ospf

[RouterA-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[RouterA-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls te enable

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterA-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] ospf

[RouterB-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[RouterB-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls te enable

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterB-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] ospf

[RouterC-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[RouterC-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls te enable

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterC-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] ospf

[RouterD-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[RouterD-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls te enable

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterD-ospf-1] quit

6.     Configure an explicit path on Router A. Specify Router B and Router D as loose nodes, and Router C as a strict node.

[RouterA] explicit-path atod

[RouterA-explicit-path-atod] nexthop 10.1.1.2 include loose

[RouterA-explicit-path-atod] nexthop 20.1.1.2 include strict

[RouterA-explicit-path-atod] nexthop 30.1.1.2 include loose

[RouterA-explicit-path-atod] quit

7.     Configure MPLS TE attributes of links:

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router A.

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router B.

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router C.

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Router D.

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

8.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel on Router A:

# Configure MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 1.

[RouterA] interface tunnel 1 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel1] ip address 7.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router D.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] destination 4.4.4.9

# Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Assign 2000 kbps bandwidth to the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te bandwidth 2000

# Specify explicit path atod for the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te path preference 5 explicit-path atod

[RouterA-Tunnel1] quit

9.     Configure a static route on Router A to direct the traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to MPLS TE tunnel 1.

[RouterA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 1 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the tunnel interface is up on Router A.

[RouterA] display interface tunnel 1

Tunnel1

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel1 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1496

Internet address: 7.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 4.4.4.9

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Last clearing of counters: Never

Last 300 seconds input: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Last 300 seconds output: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

# Display detailed information about the MPLS TE tunnel on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 1

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up, Shared-resource CRLSP down)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 23549           Tunnel ID            : 1

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.9         Egress LSR ID        : 4.4.4.9

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : SE

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : CT0             Tunnel Bandwidth     : 2000 kbps

  Reserved Bandwidth   : 2000 kbps

  Setup Priority       : 7               Holding Priority     : 7

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : 0/0

  Explicit Path        : atod

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : Disabled        Record Label         : Disabled

  FRR Flag             : Disabled        Bandwidth Protection : Disabled

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: Disabled        Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : No              Auto Created         : No

  Route Pinning        : Disabled

  Retry Limit          : 10              Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : Disabled        Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : None            Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : Disabled        Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

# Verify that Router A has a static route entry with interface Tunnel 1 as the output interface.

[RouterA] display ip routing-table

 

Destinations : 14       Routes : 14

 

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

 

1.1.1.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.2.2.9/32         O_INTRA 10  1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

3.3.3.9/32         O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

4.4.4.9/32         O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

7.1.1.0/24         Direct  0   0           7.1.1.1         Tun1

7.1.1.1/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

20.1.1.0/24        O_ASE   150 1           10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

100.1.2.0/24       Static  1   0           0.0.0.0         Tun1

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

Example: Establishing an inter-area MPLS TE tunnel over a CRLSP calculated by PCEs

Network configuration

Router A, Router B, Router C, and Router D support MPLS TE and run OSPF.

Configure Router A and Router B as PCEs, and configure Router C as a PCC to automatically discover the PCEs.

Establish an MPLS TE tunnel over a CRLSP from Router C to Router D that uses the inter-area path calculated by PCEs.

Figure 12 Network diagram

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure OSPF to advertise interface addresses and configure OSPF TE:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] ospf

[RouterA-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.0

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls te enable

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterA-ospf-1] area 1

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] network 10.3.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] quit

[RouterA-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router B.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] ospf

[RouterB-ospf-1] area 0

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.2 0.0.0.0

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls te enable

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[RouterB-ospf-1] area 2

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] network 10.3.2.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] quit

[RouterB-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router C.

<RouterC> system-view

[RouterC] ospf

[RouterC-ospf-1] area 1

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] network 10.3.1.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] network 3.3.3.3 0.0.0.0

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] mpls te enable

[RouterC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.1] quit

[RouterC-ospf-1] quit

# Configure Router D.

<RouterD> system-view

[RouterD] ospf

[RouterD-ospf-1] area 2

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] network 10.3.2.0 0.0.0.255

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] network 4.4.4.4 0.0.0.0

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] mpls te enable

[RouterD-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.2] quit

[RouterD-ospf-1] quit

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.1

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] rsvp

[RouterA-rsvp] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.2

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] quit

[RouterB] rsvp

[RouterB-rsvp] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.3

[RouterC] mpls te

[RouterC-te] quit

[RouterC] rsvp

[RouterC-rsvp] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.4

[RouterD] mpls te

[RouterD-te] quit

[RouterD] rsvp

[RouterD-rsvp] quit

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

4.     Configure Router A and Router B as PCEs:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] pce address 1.1.1.1

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] pce address 2.2.2.2

5.     Configure Router C as a PCC to use the path calculated by PCEs:

# Configure MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 1.

[RouterC] interface tunnel 1 mode mpls-te

[RouterC-Tunnel1] ip address 7.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router D.

[RouterC-Tunnel1] destination 4.4.4.4

# Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

[RouterC-Tunnel1] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Configure the tunnel to use the path calculated by PCEs.

[RouterC-Tunnel1] mpls te path preference 2 dynamic pce 1.1.1.1 2.2.2.2

[RouterC-Tunnel1] quit

Verifying the configuration

# Display discovered PCE information on each router. This example uses Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te pce discovery verbose

PCE address: 2.2.2.2

  Discovery methods: OSPF

  Path scopes:

    Path scope                                                Preference

    Compute intra-area paths                                  7

    Act as PCE for inter-area TE LSP computation              6

    Act as a default PCE for inter-area TE LSP computation    6

  Capabilities:

    Bidirectional path computation

    Support for request prioritization

    Support for multiple requests per message

  Domains:

    OSPF 1 area 0.0.0.0

    OSPF 1 area 0.0.0.2

# Verify that PCEP sessions have been established on each router. This example uses Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te pce peer verbose

Peer address: 2.2.2.2

  TCP connection          : 1.1.1.1:29507 -> 2.2.2.2:4189

  Peer type               : PCE

  Session type            : Stateless

  Session state           : UP

  Mastership              : Normal

  Role                    : Active

  Session up time         : 0000 days 00 hours 00 minutes

  Session ID              : Local 0, Peer 0

  Keepalive interval      : Local 30 sec, Peer 30 sec

  Recommended DeadTimer   : Local 120 sec, Peer 120 sec

  Tolerance:

    Min keepalive interval: 10 sec

    Max unknown messages  : 5

  Request timeout         : 10 sec

  Delegation timeout      : 30 sec

 

Peer address: 3.3.3.3

  TCP connection          : 3.3.3.3:29507 -> 1.1.1.1:4189

  Peer type               : PCC

  Session type            : Stateless

  Session state           : UP

  Mastership              : Normal

  Role                    : Active

  Session up time         : 0000 days 00 hours 00 minutes

  Session ID              : Local 2, Peer 0

  Keepalive interval      : Local 30 sec, Peer 30 sec

  Recommended DeadTimer   : Local 120 sec, Peer 120 sec

  Tolerance:

    Min keepalive interval: 10 sec

    Max unknown messages  : 5

  Request timeout         : 10 sec

  Delegation timeout      : 30 sec

Example: Configuring CRLSP backup

Network configuration

Router A, Router B, Router C, and Router D run IS-IS and IS-IS TE.

Use RSVP-TE to establish an MPLS TE tunnel from Router A to Router C to transmit data between the two IP networks. Enable CRLSP hot-standby backup for the tunnel to simultaneously establish a primary CRLSP and a backup CRLSP. When the primary CRLSP fails, traffic is switched to the backup CRLSP.

Figure 13 Network diagram

Table 5 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Router A

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

Router D

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

40.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/3

30.1.1.1/24

Router C

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

Router B

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

20.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.2.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/3

40.1.1.2/24

 

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address, and configure IS-IS TE. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] rsvp

[RouterA-rsvp] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/3

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/3] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/3] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/3] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/3] quit

# Configure Router B, Router C, and Router D in the same way that Router A is configured. (Details not shown.)

4.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel on Router A:

# Configure MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 3.

[RouterA] interface tunnel 3 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel3] ip address 9.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router C.

[RouterA-Tunnel3] destination 3.3.3.9

# Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel3] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Enable CRLSP hot-standby backup for the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel3] mpls te backup hot-standby

[RouterA-Tunnel3] quit

5.     Configure a static route on Router A to direct the traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to MPLS TE tunnel 3.

[RouterA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 3 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the tunnel interface Tunnel 3 is up on Router A.

[RouterA] display interface tunnel

Tunnel3

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel3 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1496

Internet address: 9.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 3.3.3.9

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Output queue - Urgent queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/100/0

Output queue - Protocol queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/500/0

Output queue - FIFO queuing: Size/Length/Discards 0/75/0

Last clearing of counters: Never

Last 300 seconds input rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Last 300 seconds output rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

Output: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

# Verify that two CRLSPs exist on Router A, one with the output interface HundredGigE 1/0/1 and the other with the output interface HundredGigE 1/0/3.

[RouterA] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

1.1.1.9/3/34311             RSVP     -/1150          HGE1/0/1

1.1.1.9/3/34312             RSVP     -/1151          HGE1/0/3

10.1.1.2                    Local    -/-             HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.2                    Local    -/-             HGE1/0/3

Tunnel3                     Local    -/-             NHLFE1026

Backup                               -/-             NHLFE1028

# Display the paths used by the two CRLSPs on Router A.

[RouterA] display rsvp lsp verbose

Tunnel name: RouterA_t3

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 1.1.1.9

Tunnel ID: 3                              LSP ID: 30106

LSR type: Ingress                         Direction: Unidirectional

Setup priority: 7                         Holding priority: 7

In-Label: -                               Out-Label: 1137

In-Interface: -                           Out-Interface: HGE1/0/1

Nexthop: 10.1.1.2                         Exclude-any: 0

Include-Any: 0                            Include-all: 0

Mean rate (CIR): 0 kbps                   Mean burst size (CBS): 1000.00 bytes

Path MTU: 1500                            Class type: CT0

RRO number: 6

  10.1.1.1/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  10.1.1.2/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR/In-Int)

  2.2.2.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

  20.1.1.1/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  20.1.1.2/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR/In-Int)

  3.3.3.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

Fast Reroute protection: None

 

Tunnel name: RouterA_t3

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 1.1.1.9

Tunnel ID: 3                              LSP ID: 30107

LSR type: Ingress                         Direction: Unidirectional

Setup priority: 7                         Holding priority: 7

In-Label: -                               Out-Label: 1150

In-Interface: -                           Out-Interface: HGE1/0/3

Nexthop: 30.1.1.2                         Exclude-any: 0

Include-Any: 0                            Include-all: 0

Mean rate (CIR): 0 kbps                   Mean burst size (CBS): 1000.00 bytes

Path MTU: 1500                            Class type: CT0

RRO number: 6

  30.1.1.1/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  30.1.1.2/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR/In-Int)

  4.4.4.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

  40.1.1.1/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  40.1.1.2/32        Flag: 0x00 (No FRR/In-Int)

  3.3.3.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

Fast Reroute protection: None

# Trace the path that MPLS TE tunnel 3 traverses. The output shows that the used CRLSP is the one that traverses Router B.

[RouterA] tracert mpls te tunnel 3

MPLS trace route TE tunnel Tunnel3

  TTL   Replier            Time    Type      Downstream

  0                                Ingress   10.1.1.2/[1147]

  1     10.1.1.2           1 ms    Transit   20.1.1.2/[3]

  2     20.1.1.2           2 ms    Egress

# Shut down interface HundredGigE 1/0/2 on Router B, and then tracert tunnel 3. The output shows that packets are forwarded on the CRLSP that traverses Router D.

[RouterA] tracert mpls te tunnel 3

MPLS trace route TE tunnel Tunnel3

  TTL   Replier            Time    Type      Downstream

  0                                Ingress   30.1.1.2/[1148]

  1     30.1.1.2           2 ms    Transit   40.1.1.2/[3]

  2     40.1.1.2           3 ms    Egress

# Verify that only one CRLSP exists on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

1.1.1.9/3/34313             RSVP     -/1150          HGE1/0/3

30.1.1.2                    Local    -/-             HGE1/0/3

Tunnel3                     Local    -/-             NHLFE1029

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on Router A. The output shows a static route entry with interface Tunnel 3 as the output interface. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring manual bypass tunnel for FRR

Network configuration

On the primary CRLSP Router A—Router B—Router C—Router D, use FRR to protect the link Router B—Router C.

Use RSVP-TE to establish the primary CRLSP and bypass tunnel based on the constraints of the explicit paths to transmit data between the two IP networks. The bypass tunnel uses path Router B—Router E—Router C. Router B is the PLR and Router C is the MP.

Configure BFD for RSVP-TE between Router B and Router C. When the link between Router B and Router C fails, BFD can detect the failure quickly and notify RSVP-TE of the failure, so RSVP-TE can switch traffic to the bypass tunnel.

Figure 14 Network diagram

Table 6 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Router A

Loop0

1.1.1.1/32

Router B

Loop0

2.2.2.2/32

 

HGE1/0/1

2.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

2.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

3.1.1.1/24

Router D

Loop0

4.4.4.4/32

 

HGE1/0/4

3.2.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

4.1.1.2/24

Router C

Loop0

3.3.3.3/32

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.2.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

4.1.1.1/24

Router E

Loop0

5.5.5.5/32

 

HGE1/0/2

3.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/3

3.3.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/4

3.3.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/4

3.2.1.2/24

 

 

 

 

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE on each router. Enable BFD for RSVP-TE on Router B and Router C:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.1

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] rsvp

[RouterA-rsvp] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure Router B.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.2

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] quit

[RouterB] rsvp

[RouterB-rsvp] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp bfd enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/4

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/4] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/4] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/4] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/4] quit

# Configure Router C in the same way that Router B is configured. Configure Router D and Router E in the same way that Router A is configured. (Details not shown.)

4.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel on Router A, the ingress node of the primary CRLSP:

# Configure an explicit path for the primary CRLSP.

[RouterA] explicit-path pri-path

[RouterA-explicit-path-pri-path] nexthop 2.1.1.2

[RouterA-explicit-path-pri-path] nexthop 3.1.1.2

[RouterA-explicit-path-pri-path] nexthop 4.1.1.2

[RouterA-explicit-path-pri-path] nexthop 4.4.4.4

[RouterA-explicit-path-pri-path] quit

# Create MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 4 for the primary CRLSP.

[RouterA] interface tunnel 4 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel4] ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router D.

[RouterA-Tunnel4] destination 4.4.4.4

# Specify the tunnel signaling protocol as RSVP-TE.

[RouterA-Tunnel4] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Specify the explicit path as pri-path.

[RouterA-Tunnel4] mpls te path preference 1 explicit-path pri-path

# Enable FRR for the MPLS TE tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel4] mpls te fast-reroute

[RouterA-Tunnel4] quit

# Verify that the tunnel interface Tunnel 4 is up on Router A.

[RouterA] display interface tunnel

Tunnel4

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel4 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1496

Internet address: 10.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 4.4.4.4

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Last clearing of counters: Never

Last 300 seconds input rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Last 300 seconds output rate: 1911 bytes/sec, 15288 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

Output: 1526 packets, 22356852 bytes, 0 drops

# Display detailed information about the MPLS TE tunnel on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 4

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up, Shared-resource CRLSP down)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 48960           Tunnel ID            : 4

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.1         Egress LSR ID        : 3.3.3.3

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : SE

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : CT0             Tunnel Bandwidth     : 0 kbps

  Reserved Bandwidth   : 0 kbps

  Setup Priority       : 7               Holding Priority     : 7

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : 0/0

  Explicit Path        : pri-path

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : Enabled         Record Label         : Enabled

  FRR Flag             : Enabled         Bandwidth Protection : Disabled

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: Disabled        Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : No              Auto Created         : No

  Route Pinning        : Disabled

  Retry Limit          : 10              Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : Disabled        Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : None            Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : Disabled        Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

5.     Configure a bypass tunnel on Router B (the PLR):

# Configure an explicit path for the bypass tunnel.

[RouterB] explicit-path by-path

[RouterB-explicit-path-by-path] nexthop 3.2.1.2

[RouterB-explicit-path-by-path] nexthop 3.3.1.2

[RouterB-explicit-path-by-path] nexthop 3.3.3.3

[RouterB-explicit-path-by-path] quit

# Create MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 5 for the bypass tunnel.

[RouterB] interface tunnel 5 mode mpls-te

[RouterB-Tunnel5] ip address 11.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as LSR ID of Router C.

[RouterB-Tunnel5] destination 3.3.3.3

# Specify the tunnel signaling protocol as RSVP-TE.

[RouterB-Tunnel5] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Specify the explicit path to be used as by-path.

[RouterB-Tunnel5] mpls te path preference 1 explicit-path by-path

# Set the bandwidth that the bypass tunnel can protect.

[RouterB-Tunnel5] mpls te backup bandwidth un-limited

[RouterB-Tunnel5] quit

# Bind the bypass tunnel to the protected interface.

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te fast-reroute bypass-tunnel tunnel 5

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Execute the display interface tunnel command on Router B. The output shows that the tunnel interface Tunnel 5 is up. (Details not shown.)

6.     Configure a static route on Router A to direct the traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to MPLS TE tunnel 4.

[RouterA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 4 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Display LSP entries on each router to verify that Router B and Router C each have two CRLSPs and the bypass tunnel backs up the primary CRLSP.

[RouterA] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

1.1.1.1/4/48960             RSVP     -/1245          HGE1/0/1

2.1.1.2                     Local    -/-             HGE1/0/1

[RouterB] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

1.1.1.1/4/48960             RSVP     1245/3          HGE1/0/2

Backup                               1245/3          Tun5

2.2.2.2/5/31857             RSVP     -/3             HGE1/0/2

3.2.1.2                     Local    -/-             HGE1/0/4

3.1.1.2                     Local    -/-             HGE1/0/2

# Shut down the protected interface HundredGigE 1/0/2 on the PLR (Router B).

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] shutdown

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Execute the display interface tunnel 4 command on Router A to display information about the primary CRLSP. The output shows that the tunnel interface is still up. (Details not shown.)

# Display detailed information about the tunnel interface on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 4

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up, Shared-resource CRLSP being set up)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 18753           Tunnel ID            : 4

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.1         Egress LSR ID        : 3.3.3.3

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : SE

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : CT0             Tunnel Bandwidth     : 0 kbps

  Reserved Bandwidth   : 0 kbps

  Setup Priority       : 7               Holding Priority     : 7

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : 0/0

  Explicit Path        : pri-path

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : Enabled         Record Label         : Enabled

  FRR Flag             : Enabled         Bandwidth Protection : Disabled

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: Disabled        Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : No              Auto Created         : No

  Route Pinning        : Disabled

  Retry Limit          : 10              Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : Disabled        Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : None            Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : Disabled        Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

 

 

NOTE:

If you execute the display mpls te tunnel-interface command immediately after an FRR, you can see two CRLSPs in up state. This is because FRR uses the make-before-break mechanism to set up a new LSP, and the old LSP is deleted after the new one has been established for a while.

 

# Verify that the bypass tunnel is in use on Router B.

[RouterB] display mpls lsp

FEC                         Proto    In/Out Label    Out Inter/NHLFE/LSINDEX

1.1.1.1/4/18753             RSVP     1122/3          Tun5

2.2.2.2/5/40312             RSVP     -/1150          HGE1/0/4

3.2.1.2                     Local    -/-             HGE1/0/4

# On the PLR, set the interval for selecting an optimal bypass tunnel to 5 seconds.

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] fast-reroute timer 5

[RouterB-te] quit

# On the PLR, bring up the protected interface HundredGigE 1/0/2.

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] undo shutdown

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Execute the display interface tunnel 4 command on Router A to display information about the primary CRLSP. The output shows that the tunnel interface is in up state. (Details not shown.)

# Wait for about 5 seconds, execute the display mpls lsp verbose command on Router B. The output shows that Tunnel 5 is bound to interface HundredGigE 1/0/2 but not in use. (Details not shown.)

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on Router A. The output shows  a static route entry with interface Tunnel 4 as the output interface. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring IETF DS-TE

Network configuration

Router A, Router B, Router C, and Router D run IS-IS and all of them are Level-2 routers.

Use RSVP-TE to establish an MPLS TE tunnel from Router A to Router D to transmit data between the two IP networks. Traffic of the tunnel belongs to CT 2, and the tunnel needs a bandwidth of 4000 kbps.

The maximum bandwidth of the link that the tunnel traverses is 10000 kbps and the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link is 10000 kbps. BC 1, BC 2, and BC 3 are 8000 kbps, 5000 kbps, and 2000 kbps.

Figure 15 Network diagram

Table 7 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Router A

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

Router C

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.2/24

Router B

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

Router D

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.2.1/24

 

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address:

# Configure Router A.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] isis 1

[RouterA-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0001.00

[RouterA-isis-1] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterA] interface loopback 0

[RouterA-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterA-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterA-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router B.

<RouterB> system-view

[RouterB] isis 1

[RouterB-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0002.00

[RouterB-isis-1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis enable 1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

[RouterB] interface loopback 0

[RouterB-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterB-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterB-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router C.

<RouterC> system-view

[RouterC] isis 1

[RouterC-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0003.00

[RouterC-isis-1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis enable 1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

[RouterC] interface loopback 0

[RouterC-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterC-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterC-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Router D.

<RouterD> system-view

[RouterD] isis 1

[RouterD-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0004.00

[RouterD-isis-1] quit

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis enable 1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterD] interface loopback 0

[RouterD-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[RouterD-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[RouterD-LoopBack0] quit

# Verify that the routers have learned the routes to one another, including the routes to the loopback interfaces. This example uses Router A.

[RouterA] display ip routing-table

Destinations : 10       Routes : 10

Destination/Mask   Proto   Pre Cost        NextHop         Interface

1.1.1.9/32         Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

2.2.2.9/32         IS_L1   15  10          10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

3.3.3.9/32         IS_L1   15  20          10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

4.4.4.9/32         IS_L1   15  30          10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.0/24        Direct  0   0           10.1.1.1        HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/32        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

20.1.1.0/24        IS_L1   15  20          10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.0/24        IS_L1   15  30          10.1.1.2        HGE1/0/1

127.0.0.0/8        Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

127.0.0.1/32       Direct  0   0           127.0.0.1       InLoop0

3.     Configure an LSR ID, enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE, and configure the DS-TE mode as IETF:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[RouterA] mpls te

[RouterA-te] ds-te mode ietf

[RouterA-te] quit

[RouterA] rsvp

[RouterA-rsvp] quit

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[RouterB] mpls te

[RouterB-te] ds-te mode ietf

[RouterB-te] quit

[RouterB] rsvp

[RouterB-rsvp] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[RouterC] mpls te

[RouterC-te] ds-te mode ietf

[RouterC-te] quit

[RouterC] rsvp

[RouterC-rsvp] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] rsvp enable

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[RouterD] mpls te

[RouterD-te] ds-te mode ietf

[RouterD-te] quit

[RouterD] rsvp

[RouterD-rsvp] quit

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] rsvp enable

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

4.     Enable IS-IS TE, and configure IS-IS to receive and send only packets whose cost style is wide:

# Configure Router A.

[RouterA] isis 1

[RouterA-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterA-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterA-isis-1] quit

# Configure Router B.

[RouterB] isis 1

[RouterB-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterB-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterB-isis-1] quit

# Configure Router C.

[RouterC] isis 1

[RouterC-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterC-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterC-isis-1] quit

# Configure Router D.

[RouterD] isis 1

[RouterD-isis-1] cost-style wide

[RouterD-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[RouterD-isis-1] quit

5.     Configure MPLS TE attributes of links:

# Set the maximum bandwidth, maximum reservable bandwidth, and bandwidth constraints on Router A.

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm 10000 bc1 8000 bc2 5000 bc3 2000

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

# Set the maximum bandwidth, maximum reservable bandwidth, and bandwidth constraints on Router B.

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm 10000 bc1 8000 bc2 5000 bc3 2000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterB] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm 10000 bc1 8000 bc2 5000 bc3 2000

[RouterB-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum bandwidth, maximum reservable bandwidth, and bandwidth constraints on Router C.

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm 10000 bc1 8000 bc2 5000 bc3 2000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

[RouterC] interface hundredgige 1/0/2

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm 10000 bc1 8000 bc2 5000 bc3 2000

[RouterC-HundredGigE1/0/2] quit

# Set the maximum bandwidth, maximum reservable bandwidth, and bandwidth constraints on Router D.

[RouterD] interface hundredgige 1/0/1

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth rdm 10000 bc1 8000 bc2 5000 bc3 2000

[RouterD-HundredGigE1/0/1] quit

6.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel on Router A:

# Create MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 1.

[RouterA] interface tunnel 1 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel1] ip address 7.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Router D.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] destination 4.4.4.9

# Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Assign 4000 kbps bandwidth to CT 2 for the tunnel.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te bandwidth ct2 4000

# Set the tunnel setup priority and holding priority both to 0.

[RouterA-Tunnel1] mpls te priority 0

[RouterA-Tunnel1] quit

7.     Configure a static route on Router A to direct the traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to MPLS TE tunnel 1.

[RouterA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 1 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the tunnel interface is up on Router A.

[RouterA] display interface tunnel

Tunnel1

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel1 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 1496

Internet address: 7.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 4.4.4.9

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Last clearing of counters: Never

Last 300 seconds input rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Last 300 seconds output rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets input, 0 bytes 0 drops

Output: 0 packets output, 0 bytes 0 drops

# Display detailed information about the MPLS TE tunnel on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 1

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up, Shared-resource CRLSP down)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 36882           Tunnel ID            : 1

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.9         Egress LSR ID        : 4.4.4.9

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : SE

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : CT2             Tunnel Bandwidth     : 4000 kbps

  Reserved Bandwidth   : 4000 kbps

  Setup Priority       : 0               Holding Priority     : 0

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : 0/0

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : Disabled        Record Label         : Disabled

  FRR Flag             : Disabled        Bandwidth Protection : Disabled

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: Disabled        Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : No              Auto Created         : No

  Route Pinning        : Disabled

  Retry Limit          : 10              Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : Disabled        Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : None            Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : Disabled        Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

# Display bandwidth information on interface HundredGigE 1/0/1 on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te link-management bandwidth-allocation interface hundredgige 1/0/1

Interface:  HundredGigE1/0/1

  Max Link Bandwidth                          : 10000 kbps

  Max Reservable Bandwidth of Prestandard RDM : 0 kbps

  Max Reservable Bandwidth of IETF RDM        : 10000 kbps

  Max Reservable Bandwidth of IETF MAM        : 0 kbps

  Allocated Bandwidth-Item Count  : 1

  Allocated Bandwidth             : 4000 kbps

  Physical Link Status            : Up

  BC  Prestandard RDM(kbps)  IETF RDM(kbps)       IETF MAM(kbps)

  0   0                      10000                0

  1   0                      8000                 0

  2   -                      5000                 0

  3   -                      2000                 0

  TE Class    Class Type    Priority   BW Reserved(kbps)  BW Available(kbps)

  0           0             7          0                  6000

  1           1             7          0                  4000

  2           2             7          0                  1000

  3           3             7          0                  1000

  4           0             0          0                  6000

  5           1             0          0                  4000

  6           2             0          4000               1000

  7           3             0          0                  1000

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on Router A. The output shows a static route entry with interface Tunnel1 as the output interface. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring CBTS

Network configuration

As shown in Figure 16, all routers run IS-IS.

Use RSVP-TE to establish the following MPLS TE tunnels between Router A and Router E:

·     Router A—Router B—Router E.

·     Router A—Router C—Router E.

·     Router A—Router D—Router E.

Assign the MPLS TE tunnels different service class values for different classes of services.

Figure 16 Network diagram

 

Table 8 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Router A

Loop0

1.1.1.1/32

Router D

Loop0

4.4.4.4/32

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

30.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

20.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/2

40.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/3

30.1.1.1/24

Router E

Loop0

5.5.5.5/32

 

HGE1/0/4

100.1.1.1/24

 

HGE1/0/1

100.1.1.2/24

Router B

Loop0

2.2.2.2/32

 

HGE1/0/2

200.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/1

10.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/3

40.1.1.1.2/24

 

HGE1/0/2

100.1.1.1/24

 

 

 

Router C

Loop0

3.3.3.3/32

 

 

 

 

HGE1/0/1

20.1.1.2/24

 

 

 

 

HGE1/0/2

200.1.1.1/24

 

 

 

 

Procedure

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT:

By default, interfaces on the device are disabled (in ADM or Administratively Down state). To have an interface operate, you must use the undo shutdown command to enable that interface.

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces, including the loopback interfaces, as shown in Figure 16. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses including loopback interface addresses, and configure IS-IS TE. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP-TE on each router. (Details not shown.)

4.     Use RSVP-TE to establish three MPLS TE tunnels: Tunnel 1, Tunnel 2, and Tunnel 3. Tunnel 1 uses path Router A—Router B—Router E. Tunnel 2 uses path Router A—Router C—Router E. Tunnel 3 uses path Router A—Router D—Router E. (Details not shown.)

5.     Configure a QoS policy on Router A.

# Create a traffic class.

<RouterA> system-view

[RouterA] traffic classifier class

[RouterA-classifier-class] if-match any

[RouterA-classifier-class] quit

# Create a traffic behavior.

[RouterA] traffic behavior behave

[RouterA-behavior-behave] remark service-class 3

[RouterA-behavior-behave] quit

# Create a QoS policy.

[RouterA] qos policy policy

[RouterA-qospolicy-policy] classifier class behavior behave

[RouterA-qospolicy-policy] quit

# Apply the QoS policy to GigabitEthernet 1/0/4.

[RouterA] interface hundredgige 1/0/4

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/4] qos apply policy policy inbound

[RouterA-HundredGigE1/0/4] quit

6.     Set the service class values for the MPLS TE tunnels.

# Set the service class value to 3 for Tunnel 2.

[RouterA]interface Tunnel 2 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel2] mpls te service-class 3

[RouterA-Tunnel2] quit

# Set the service class value to 6 for Tunnel 3.

[RouterA]interface Tunnel 3 mode mpls-te

[RouterA-Tunnel3] mpls te service-class 6

[RouterA-Tunnel3] quit

Verifying the configuration

# Display information about Tunnel 1 on Router A.

[RouterA] display mpls te tunnel-interface Tunnel 1

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 1

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 17419           Tunnel ID            : 1

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 10.1.1.1        Egress LSR ID        : 40.1.1.1

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : -

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : -               Tunnel Bandwidth     : -

  Reserved Bandwidth   : -

  Setup Priority       : 0               Holding Priority     : 0

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : -/-

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : -               Record Label         : -

  FRR Flag             : -               Bandwidth Protection : -

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: -               Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : -               Auto Created         : -

  Route Pinning        : -

  Retry Limit          : 3               Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : -               Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : -               Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : -               Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

The Service-Class field has no value, indicating that no service class value is set for Tunnel 1.

# Display information about Tunnel 2 and Tunnel 3 on Router A.

[RouterA]display mpls te tunnel-interface Tunnel 2

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 2

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 17418           Tunnel ID            : 2

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 10.1.1.1        Egress LSR ID        : 40.1.1.1

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : -

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : -               Tunnel Bandwidth     : -

  Reserved Bandwidth   : -

  Setup Priority       : 0               Holding Priority     : 0

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : -/-

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : -               Record Label         : -

  FRR Flag             : -               Bandwidth Protection : -

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: -               Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : -               Auto Created         : -

  Route Pinning        : -

  Retry Limit          : 3               Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : -               Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : -               Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : -               Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : 3

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

 

[RouterA]display mpls te tunnel-interface Tunnel 3

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 3

Tunnel State           : Up (Main CRLSP up)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 17418           Tunnel ID            : 3

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 10.1.1.1        Egress LSR ID        : 40.1.1.1

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Static SRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : -

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : -               Tunnel Bandwidth     : -

  Reserved Bandwidth   : -

  Setup Priority       : 0               Holding Priority     : 0

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : -/-

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : -               Record Label         : -

  FRR Flag             : -               Bandwidth Protection : -

  Backup Bandwidth Flag: -               Backup Bandwidth Type: -

  Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Bypass Tunnel        : -               Auto Created         : -

  Route Pinning        : -

  Retry Limit          : 3               Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : -               Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : -               Backup LSP ID        : -

  Backup Restore Time  : 10 sec

  Auto Bandwidth       : -               Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : 6

  Traffic Policy       : Disable         Reserved for binding : No

  Path SetupType       : -/-

  Binding SID          : -               Binding SID State    : -

  Last Down Reason     : Admin Down

  Down Time            : 2017-12-05 11:23:35:535

The Service-Class fields show that the service class values of Tunnel 2 and Tunnel 3 are 3 and 6, respectively. According to the QoS policy, traffic arrives at HundredGigE 1/0/4 of Router A is assigned service class value 3. So CBTS uses Tunnel 2 to forward the traffic.

Troubleshooting MPLS TE

No TE LSA generated

Symptom

OSPF TE is configured but no TE LSAs can be generated to describe MPLS TE attributes.

Analysis

For TE LSAs to be generated, a minimum of one OSPF neighbor must reach FULL state.

Solution

1.     To resolve the problem:

a.     Use the display current-configuration command to verify that MPLS TE is configured on involved interfaces.

b.     Use the debugging ospf mpls-te command to verify that OSPF can receive the TE LINK establishment message.

c.     Use the display ospf peer command to verify that OSPF neighbors are established correctly.

2.     If the problem persists, contact H3C Support.

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