ACL and QoS Command Reference

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03-QoS Commands
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03-QoS Commands 113.86 KB

l          The models listed in this document are not applicable to all regions. Please consult your local sales office for the models applicable to your region.

l          Support of the H3C WA series WLAN access points (APs) for commands may vary by AP model. For more information, see Feature Matrix.

l          The interface types and the number of interfaces vary by AP model.

l          The term AP in this document refers to common APs, wireless bridges, and mesh APs.

 

Class Configuration Commands

display traffic classifier user-defined

Syntax

display traffic classifier user-defined [ tcl-name ]

View

Any view

Default Level

1: Monitor level

Parameters

user-defined: Displays user-defined classes.

tcl-name: Name of a class.

Description

Use the display traffic classifier command to display information about user-defined classes.

If no class name is specified, the command displays information about all user-defined classes.

Examples

# Display information about all user-defined classes.

<Sysname> display traffic classifier user-defined

User Defined Classifier Information:

 Classifier: USER1

  Operator: AND

  Rule(s) : if-match ip-precedence 5

 

 Classifier: database

  Operator: AND

  Rule(s) : if-match acl 3131

            if-match inbound-interface Ethernet1/0/1

Table 1-1 display traffic classifier user-defined command output description

Field

Description

User Defined Classifier Information

User-defined class information

Classifier

Class name and its match criteria

Operator

Logical relationship between match criteria

Rule(s)

Match criteria

 

if-match

Syntax

if-match match-criteria

undo if-match match-criteria

undo if-match acl { acl-number | name acl-name } [ update acl { acl-number | name acl-name } ]

View

Class view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

match-criteria: Match criterion. Table 1-2 shows the available criteria.

acl { acl-number | name acl-name }: Specifies an ACL currently referenced in the class by the ACL name or ACL number.

update acl { acl-number | name acl-name }: Specifies a new ACL to replace the specified current ACL by the number or name of the new ACL.

Table 1-2 The range of the match-criteria argument

Value

Description

acl { acl-number | name acl-name }

Matches an ACL

The acl-number argument ranges from 2000 to 4999 for an IPv4 ACL.

The acl-name argument is a case-insensitive string of 1 to 32 characters, which must start with an English letter from a to z or A to Z and cannot be all to avoid confusion.

any

Matches all packets

dscp dscp-list

Matches DSCP values. The dscp-list argument is a list of up to 8 DSCP values. A DSCP value ranges from 0 to 63.

destination-mac mac-address

Matches a destination MAC address

customer-dot1p 8021p-list

Matches the 802.1p priority of the customer network. The 8021p-list argument is a list of up to eight 802.1p priority values. An 802.1p priority ranges from 0 to 7.

ip-precedence ip-precedence-list

Matches IP precedence. The ip-precedence-list argument is a list of up to 8 IP precedence values. An IP precedence ranges from 0 to 7.

protocol protocol-name

Matches a protocol. The protocol-name argument can be IP or IPv6.

source-mac mac-address

Matches a source MAC address

customer-vlan-id { vlan-id-list | vlan-id1 to vlan-id2 }

Matches the VLAN IDs of customer networks. The vlan-id-list argument is a list of up to 8 VLAN IDs. vlan-id1 to vlan-id2 specifies a VLAN ID range, where vlan-id1 must be smaller than vlan-id2. A VLAN ID ranges from 1 to 4094.

 

Description

Use the if-match command to define a match criterion.

Use the undo if-match command to delete the match criterion.

When defining match criteria, use the usage guidelines described in these subsections:

l          Define an ACL-based match criterion

l          Define a criterion to match a destination MAC address

l          Define a criterion to match a source MAC address

l          Define a criterion to match DSCP values

l          Define a criterion to match the 802.1p priority values of the customer network

l          Define a criterion to match the IP precedence values

l          Define a criterion to match customer network VLAN IDs

Define an ACL-based match criterion

l          If the ACL referenced in the if-match command does not exist, the class cannot be applied to hardware.

l          For a class, you can reference an ACL twice by its name and number respectively with the if-match command.

Define a criterion to match a destination MAC address

l          You can configure multiple destination MAC address match criteria for a class.

l          A criterion to match a destination MAC address is significant only to Ethernet interfaces.

Define a criterion to match a source MAC address

l          You can configure multiple source MAC address match criteria for a class.

l          A criterion to match an source MAC address is significant only to Ethernet interfaces.

Define a criterion to match DSCP values

l          You can configure multiple DSCP match criteria for a class. All the defined DSCP values are automatically arranged in ascending order.

l          You can configure up to eight DSCP values in one command line. If multiple identical DSCP values are specified, the system considers them as one. If a packet matches one of the defined DSCP values, it matches the if-match clause.

l          To delete a criterion matching DSCP values, the specified DSCP values must be identical with those defined in the rule (the sequence may be different).

Define a criterion to match the 802.1p priority values of the customer network

l          You can configure multiple 802.1p priority match criteria for a class. All the defined 802.1p values are automatically arranged in ascending order.

l          You can configure up to eight 802.1p priority values in one command line. If the same 802.1p priority value is specified multiple times, the system considers them as one. If a packet matches one of the defined 802.1p priority values, it matches the if-match clause.

l          To delete a criterion matching 802.1p priority values, the specified 802.1p priority values in the command must be identical with those defined in the criterion (the sequence may be different).

l          The match criterion takes effect only on incoming traffic.

Define a criterion to match the IP precedence values

l          You can configure multiple IP precedence match criteria for a class. The defined IP precedence values are automatically arranged in ascending order.

l          You can configure up to eight IP precedence values in one command line. If the same IP precedence is specified multiple times, the system considers them as one. If a packet matches one of the defined IP precedence values, it matches the if-match clause.

l          To delete a criterion that matches IP precedence values, the specified IP precedence values in the command must be identical with those defined in the criterion (the sequence may be different).

Define a criterion to match customer network VLAN IDs

l          You can configure multiple VLAN ID match criteria for a class. The defined VLAN IDs are automatically arranged in ascending order.

l          You can configure multiple VLAN IDs in one command line. If the same VLAN ID is specified multiple times, the system considers them as one. If a packet matches one of the defined VLAN IDs, it matches the if-match clause.

l          To delete a criterion that matches VLAN IDs, the specified VLAN IDs in the command must be identical with those defined in the criterion (the sequence may be different).

l          The match criterion takes effect only on incoming traffic.

Related commands: traffic classifier.

 

Support for the augments and keywords of the if-match command varies by AP model.

 

Examples

# Define a criterion to match IP packets.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match protocol ip

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match the packets with the destination MAC address 0050-ba27-bed3.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match destination-mac 0050-ba27-bed3

# Define a match criterion for class class2 to match the packets with the source MAC address 0050-ba27-bed2.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class2

[Sysname-classifier-class2] if-match source-mac 0050-ba27-bed2

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match ACL 3101.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match acl 3101

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match all packets.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match any

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match the packets with IP precedence 5. Reference class class1 to define a match criterion for class class2.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match ip-precedence 5

# Define match criteria for class class1 to match the packets that have the destination MAC address 0050-BA27-BED3.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match destination-address mac 0050-BA27-BED3

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match the packets with a DSCP precedence of 1, 6 or 9.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match dscp 1 6 9

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match the packets with an IP precedence of 1 or 6.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match ip-precedence 1 6

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match IP packets.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match protocol ip

# Define a match criterion for class class1 to match the packets with customer network VLAN ID 1, 6, or 9.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1] if-match customer-vlan-id 1 6 9

traffic classifier

Syntax

traffic classifier tcl-name [ operator { and | or } ]

undo traffic classifier tcl-name

View

System view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

tcl-name: Specifies a class name.

operator: Sets the operator to logic AND or OR for the class.

and: Specifies the logic AND operator. The class matches the packets that match all its criteria.

or: Specifies the logic OR operator. The class matches the packets that match any of its criteria.

Description

Use the traffic classifier command to define a class and enter class view.

Use the undo traffic classifier command to delete a class.

If no match operator is specified, the default AND operator applies.

Related commands: qos policy, qos apply policy, and classifier behavior.

Examples

# Create a class named class1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic classifier class1

[Sysname-classifier-class1]

Traffic Behavior Configuration Commands

car

Syntax

car cir committed-information-rate [ cbs committed-burst-size [ ebs excess-burst-size ] ] [ pir peak-information-rate ] [ red action ]

undo car

View

Traffic behavior view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

cir committed-information-rate: Committed information rate (CIR) in kbps, which is the average traffic rate.

cbs committed-burst-size: Committed burst size (CBS). By default, CBS is traffic transmitted in 500 ms at the rate of CIR.

ebs excess-burst-size: Excess burst size (EBS) in bytes. The default is 0.

pir peak information rate: Peak information rate (PIR) in kbps.

red action: Sets the action to take on packets that conforms to neither CIR nor PIR. The default action is discard.

action: Sets the action to take on packets:

l          discard: Drops packets.

l          pass: Permits packets to pass through.

Description

Use the car command to configure a CAR action in the traffic behavior.

Use the undo car command to delete a CAR action from the traffic behavior.

You can apply a QoS policy that references the behavior to either the incoming or outgoing traffic of an interface.

If this command is configured multiple times for the same traffic behavior, the last configuration takes effect.

Related commands: qos policy, traffic behavior, and classifier behavior.

Examples

# Configure a CAR action in traffic behavior database:

l          Set the CIR to 200 kbps, CBS to 50000 bytes, and EBS to 0.

l          Allow the conforming packets to pass, and drop the excess packets.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic behavior database

[Sysname-behavior-database] car cir 200 cbs 50000 ebs 0 red discard

display traffic behavior user-defined

Syntax

display traffic behavior user-defined [ behavior-name ]

View

Any view

Default Level

1: Monitor level

Parameters

user-defined: Displays user-defined traffic behaviors.

behavior-name: Behavior name. If no traffic behavior is specified, this command displays the information of all the user-defined behaviors.

Description

Use the display traffic behavior command to display user-defined traffic behavior information.

Examples

# Display user-defined traffic behaviors.

<Sysname> display traffic behavior user-defined

User Defined Behavior Information:

    Behavior: ipv4

      Filter enable : permit

      Committed Access Rate:

        CIR 9999 (kbps), CBS 624937 (byte), EBS 0 (byte)

        Green Action: pass

        Red Action: discard

      Marking:

        Remark local precedence 4

Table 1-3 display traffic behavior user-defined command output description

Field

Description

User Defined Behavior Information

User-defined behavior information

Behavior

Name of a behavior

Marking

Information about traffic marking

Committed Access Rate

Information about the CAR action

 

filter

Syntax

filter { deny | permit }

undo filter

View

Traffic behavior view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

deny: Drops packets.

permit: Permits packets to pass through.

Description

Use the filter command to configure a traffic filtering action in the traffic behavior.

Use the undo filter command to delete the traffic filtering action.

If you configure a deny filtering action, the traffic behavior drops all matching packets. If you configure a permit filtering action, the traffic behavior permits all matching packets to pass through.

Examples

# Configure the traffic filtering action as deny in traffic behavior database.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic behavior database

[Sysname-behavior-database] filter deny

remark dot1p

Syntax

remark dot1p 8021p

undo remark dot1p

View

Traffic behavior view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

8021p: 802.1p priority to be marked for packets, which ranges from 0 to 7.

Description

Use the remark dot1p command to configure an 802.1p priority marking action.

Use the undo remark dot1p command to delete the action.

Related commands: qos policy, traffic behavior, and classifier behavior.

Examples

# Set the 802.1p priority to 2 for packets.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic behavior database

[Sysname-behavior-database] remark dot1p 2

remark local-precedence

Syntax

remark local-precedence local-precedence

undo remark local-precedence

View

Traffic behavior view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

local-precedence: Sets the local precedence value to be marked for packets, which ranges from 0 to 7.

Description

Use the remark local-precedence command to configure a local precedence marking action.

Use the undo remark local-precedence command to delete the action.

Related commands: qos policy, traffic behavior, and classifier behavior.

Examples

# Configure traffic behavior database to mark matching traffic with local precedence 2.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic behavior database

[Sysname-behavior-database] remark local-precedence 2

traffic behavior

Syntax

traffic behavior behavior-name

undo traffic behavior behavior-name

View

System view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

behavior-name: Sets a behavior name.

Description

Use the traffic behavior command to create a traffic behavior and enter traffic behavior view.

Use the undo traffic classifier command to delete a traffic behavior.

A traffic behavior is a set of actions, such as priority marking, dropping, rate limiting, and accounting. You provide QoS for a class of traffic by associating a traffic behavior with the class of traffic.

Related commands: qos policy, qos apply policy, and classifier behavior.

Examples

# Create a traffic behavior named behavior1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] traffic behavior behavior1

[Sysname-behavior-behavior1]

QoS Policy Configuration and Application Commands

classifier behavior

Syntax

classifier tcl-name behavior behavior-name

undo classifier tcl-name

View

Policy view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

tcl-name: Class name.

behavior-name: Behavior name.

Description

Use the classifier behavior command to associate a behavior with a class in a QoS policy.

Use the undo classifier command to remove a class from the policy. You cannot remove a default class.

You can perform a set of QoS actions on a traffic class by associating a traffic behavior with the traffic class.

You can assign multiple classes to a QoS policy, and each class can associate with only one traffic behavior. You can associate a class with only one behavior.

If the specified class or traffic behavior does not exist, the system creates a null class or traffic behavior.

Related commands: qos policy.

Examples

# Associate traffic class database with traffic behavior test in QoS policy user1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] qos policy user1

[Sysname-qospolicy-user1] classifier database behavior test

[Sysname-qospolicy-user1]

display qos policy user-defined

Syntax

display qos policy user-defined [ policy-name [ classifier tcl-name ] ]

View

Any view

Default Level

1: Monitor level

Parameters

user-defined: Displays user-defined QoS policies.

policy-name: QoS policy name, a string of 1 to 31 characters. If no policy is specified, this command displays configuration information of all the policies.

tcl-name: Class name.

Description

Use the display qos policy user-defined command to display user-defined QoS policy configuration information.

Examples

# Display the configuration information of user-defined QoS policies.

<Sysname> display qos policy user-defined

User Defined QoS Policy Information:

 

  Policy: ipv4

   Classifier: ipv4

     Behavior: ipv4

      Filter enable : permit

      Committed Access Rate:

        CIR 9999 (kbps), CBS 624937 (byte), EBS 0 (byte)

        Green Action: pass

        Red Action: discard

      Marking:

        Remark local precedence 4

Table 1-4 display qos policy command output description

Field

Description

Policy

Policy name

Classifier

Class name

A policy can contain multiple classes, and each class is associated with a traffic behavior. A class can be configured with multiple match criteria. For more information, see the traffic classifier command.

Behavior

Behavior associated with the class. A behavior is associated with a class. It can be configured with multiple actions. For more information, see the traffic behavior command.

 

display qos policy interface

Syntax

display qos policy interface [ interface-type interface-number ] [ inbound | outbound ]

View

Any view

Default Level

1: Monitor level

Parameters

interface-type interface-number: Specifies an interface by its type and number.

Description

Use the display qos policy interface command to display information about the QoS policy or policies applied to an interface or all interfaces.

Examples

# Display information about the QoS policy applied to port Ethernet1/0/1.

<Sysname> display qos policy interface ethernet 1/0/1

  Interface: Ethernet1/0/1

  Direction: Inbound

  Policy: test

   Classifier: test

     Matched : 0(Packets) 0(Bytes)

     Operator: AND

     Rule(s) : If-match acl 3000

     Behavior: test

      Committed Access Rate:

        CIR 1000 (kbps), CBS 62500 (byte), EBS 0 (byte)

        Green Action: pass

        Red Action: discard

        Green : 0(Packets) 0(Bytes)

        Red   : 0(Packets) 0(Bytes)

Table 1-5 display qos policy interface command output description

Field

Description

Interface

Interface type and interface number

Direction

The direction in which the policy is applied to the interface

Policy

Name of the policy applied to the interface

Classifier

Class name and corresponding configuration information

Matched

Number of packets satisfying the match criteria

Operator

Logical relationship between match criteria in the class

Rule(s)

Match criteria in the class

Behavior

Behavior name and corresponding configuration information

 

qos apply policy

Syntax

qos apply policy policy-name { inbound | outbound }

undo qos apply policy { inbound | outbound }

View

Interface view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

inbound: Inbound direction.

outbound: Outbound direction.

policy policy-name: Specifies a policy by its name.

Description

Use the qos apply policy command to apply a QoS policy to the interface.

Use the undo qos apply policy command to remove the QoS policy.

To successfully apply a policy to an interface, make sure that the total bandwidth assigned to AF and EF in the policy is smaller than the available bandwidth of the interface. If the available bandwidth of an interface is modified to a value smaller the total bandwidth for AF and EF, the applied policy is removed.

Examples

# Apply policy USER1 to the outgoing traffic of Ethernet 1/0/1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface ethernet 1/0/1

[Sysname-Ethernet1/0/1] qos apply policy USER1 outbound

qos policy

Syntax

qos policy policy-name

undo qos policy policy-name

View

System view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

policy policy-name: Policy name, a string of 1 to 31 characters.

Description

Use the qos policy command to create a policy and enter policy view.

Use the undo qos policy command to delete a policy.

To use the undo qos policy command to delete a policy that has been applied to an interface, you must first remove it from the interface.

Related commands: classifier behavior and qos apply policy.

Examples

# Define a policy named user1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] qos policy user1

[Sysname-qospolicy-user1]

 


Priority Mapping Configuration Commands

Priority Mapping Table Configuration Commands

display qos map-table

Syntax

display qos map-table [ dot11e-lp | dot1p-lp | dscp-lp | lp-dot11e | lp-dot1p | lp-dscp ]

View

Any view

Default Level

1: Monitor level

Parameters

dot11e-lp: 802.11e-to-local priority mapping table.

dot1p-lp: 802.1p-to-local priority mapping table.

dscp-lp: DSCP-to-local priority mapping table.

lp-dot11e: Local-to-802.11e priority mapping table.

lp-dot1p: Local-to-802.1p priority mapping table.

lp-dscp: Local-to-DSCP priority mapping table.

Description

Use the display qos map-table command to display the configuration of a priority mapping table.

If no priority mapping table is specified, this command displays the configuration information of all priority mapping tables. If no direction is specified, this command displays the priority mapping tables in any direction.

Related commands: qos map-table.

Examples

# Display the configuration information of the 802.1p-to-local priority mapping table.

<Sysname> display qos map-table dot1p-lp

MAP-TABLE NAME: dot1p-lp   TYPE: pre-define

IMPORT  :  EXPORT

   0    :    2

   1    :    0

   2    :    1

   3    :    3

   4    :    4

   5    :    5

   6    :    6

   7    :    7

Table 2-1 display qos map-table command output description

Field

Description

MAP-TABLE NAME

Name of the priority mapping table

TYPE

Type of the priority mapping table

IMPORT

Input values of the priority mapping table

EXPORT

Output values of the priority mapping table

 

import

Syntax

import import-value-list export export-value

undo import { import-value-list | all }

View

Priority mapping table view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

import-value-list: List of input values.

export-value: Output value.

all: Deletes all the mappings in the priority mapping table.

Description

Use the import command to configure a mapping from one or multiple input values to an output value.

Use the undo import command to restore the specified or all mappings to the default mappings.

Related commands: display qos map-table.

Examples

# Configure the 802.1p-to-local priority mapping table to map 802.1p priority values 4 and 5 to local precedence value 1.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] qos map-table dot1p-lp

[Sysname-maptbl-dot1p-lp] import 4 5 export 1

qos map-table

Syntax

qos map-table { dot11e-lp | dot1p-lp | dscp-lp | lp-dot11e | lp-dot1p | lp-dscp }

View

System view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

dot11e-lp: 802.11e-to-local priority mapping table.

dot1p-lp: 802.1p-to-local priority mapping table.

dscp-lp: DSCP-to-local priority mapping table.

lp-dot11e: Local-to-802.11e priority mapping table.

lp-dot1p: Local-to-802.1p priority mapping table.

lp-dscp: Local-to-DSCP priority mapping table.

Description

Use the qos map-table command to enter the specified priority mapping table view.

Related commands: display qos map-table.

Examples

# Enter 802.1p-to-local priority mapping table view.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] qos map-table dot1p-lp

[Sysname-maptbl-dot1p-lp]

Port Priority Configuration Commands

qos priority

Syntax

qos priority priority-value

undo qos priority

View

Interface view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

priority-value: Port priority value, which ranges from 0 to 7.

Description

Use the qos priority command to change the port priority of an interface.

Use the undo qos priority command to restore the default value.

By default, the port priority of an interface is 0.

If a WLAN-BSS interface is in use, you cannot modify the port priority of the WLAN-BSS interface. To do so, you must stop the service the interface provides (in other words, make the current users on the interface offline) and then modify the port priority.

Examples

# Set the port priority of interface Ethernet 1/0/1 to 2.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface ethernet 1/0/1

[Sysname-Ethernet1/0/1] qos priority 2

# Set the port priority of interface WLAN-BSS 1 to 2.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface WLAN-BSS 1

[Sysname-WLAN-BSS1] qos priority 2

Priority Trust Mode Configuration Commands

display qos trust interface

Syntax

display qos trust interface [ interface-type interface-number ]

View

Any view

Default Level

1: Monitor level

Parameters

interface-type interface-number: Specifies an interface by its type and number.

Description

Use the display qos trust interface command to display the priority trust mode and port priority information of an interface.

If no interface is specified, the command displays priority trust mode and port priority information for all interfaces.

Examples

# Display the priority trust mode and port priority information of Ethernet 1/0/1.

<Sysname> display qos trust interface ethernet 1/0/1

Interface: Ethernet1/0/1

 Port priority information

  Port priority :0

  Port priority trust type : dot1p

Table 2-2 display qos trust interface command output description

Field

Description

Interface

Interface type and interface number

Port priority trust information

Priority trust mode and port priority information

Port priority trust type

Priority trust mode on the interface, which can be dot11e, dot1p, or dscp

 

qos trust

Syntax

qos trust { dot11e | dot1p | dscp }

undo qos trust

View

Interface view

Default Level

2: System level

Parameters

dot11e: Uses the 802.11e priority in incoming packets for priority mapping. This keyword is applicable to only WLAN-ESS interfaces.

dot1p: Uses the 802.1p priority in incoming packets for priority mapping. This keyword is applicable to only Ethernet interfaces.

dscp: Uses the DSCP value in incoming packets for priority mapping.

Description

Use the qos trust command to configure an interface to use a particular priority field carried in packets for priority mapping.

Use the undo qos trust command to restore the default.

By default, QoS is disabled.

When packets enter the AP, the AP assigns a series of parameters (including 802.11e priority, 802.1p priority, DSCP value, and local precedence value) to the packets as configured.

A local precedence value is locally significant and corresponds to an output queue.

If a WLAN-BSS interface is in use, you cannot modify the priority trust mode of the WLAN-BSS interface. To do so, stop the service the interface provides (in other words, make the current users on the interface offline) first.

Examples

# Configure Ethernet 1/0/1 to use the 802.1p priority in incoming packets for priority mapping.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface ethernet 1/0/1

[Sysname-Ethernet1/0/1] qos trust dot1p

# Configure WLAN-BSS 1 to use the 802.11e priority in incoming packets for priority mapping.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface wlan-bss 1

[Sysname-WLAN-BSS 1] qos trust dot11e