12-Network Management and Monitoring

HomeSupportResource CenterH3C Access Controllers Command References(E5208P03 E5215P01 R5215P01)-6W10212-Network Management and Monitoring
08-Process monitoring and maintenance commands
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08-Process monitoring and maintenance commands 188.91 KB

Process monitoring and maintenance commands

The WX1800H series, WX2500H series, and WX3000H series access controllers do not support the slot keyword or the slot-number argument.

The storage media supported by the device depends on the device model. A CF card is used as an example.

The display memory, display process, display process cpu, monitor process, and monitor thread commands display information about both user processes and kernel threads. In these commands, "process" refers to both user processes and kernel threads.

display exception context

Use display exception context to display context information for process exceptions.

Syntax

display exception context [ count value ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

count value: Specifies the number of context information entries, in the range of 1 to 20. The default value is 1.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays context information for process exceptions on the master device.  

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

The system generates a context information entry for each process exception. A context information entry includes the process ID, the crash time, the core file directory, stack information, and register information.

Examples

# Display the exception context information on the x86-based 32-bit device.

<Sysname> display exception context

Index 1 of 1

------------------------------

Crashed PID: 120 (routed)

Crash signal: SIGBUS

Crash time: Tue Apr  9 17:14:30 2013

Core file path:

cfa0:/core/node0_routed_120_7_20130409-171430_1365527670.core

#0  0xb7caba4a

#1  0x0804cb79

#2  0xb7cd77c4

#3  0x08049f45

Backtrace stopped.

                          Registers' content

  eax:0xfffffffc   ebx:0x00000003   ecx:0xbfe244ec   edx:0x0000000a

  esp:0xbfe244b8   ebp:0xbfe244c8   esi:0xffffffff   edi:0xbfe24674

  eip:0xb7caba4a eflag:0x00000292    cs:0x00000073    ss:0x0000007b

   ds:0x0000007b    es:0x0000007b    fs:0x00000000    gs:0x00000033

# Display the exception context information on the x86-based 64-bit device.

<Sysname> display exception context

Index 1 of 1

------------------------------

Crashed PID: 121 (routed)

Crash signal: SIGBUS

Crash time: Sun Mar 31 11:12:21 2013

Core file path:

cfa0:/core/node0_routed_121_7_20130331-111221_1364728341.core

#0  0x00007fae7dbad20c

#1  0x00000000004059fa

#2  0x00007fae7dbd96c0

#3  0x0000000000402b29

Backtrace stopped.

                          Registers' content

       rax:0xfffffffffffffffc       rbx:0x00007fff88a5dd10

       rcx:0xffffffffffffffff       rdx:0x000000000000000a

       rsi:0x00007fff88a5dd10       rdi:0x0000000000000003

       rbp:0x00007fff88a5dcf0       rsp:0x00007fff88a5dcf0

        r8:0x00007fae7ea587e0        r9:0x0000000000000079

       r10:0xffffffffffffffff       r11:0x0000000000000246

       r12:0x0000000000405b18       r13:0x00007fff88a5ff7a

       r14:0x00007fff88a5de30       r15:0x0000000000000000

       rip:0x00007fae7dbad20c      flag:0x0000000000000246

        cs:0x0000000000000033        ss:0x000000000000002b

        ds:0x0000000000000000        es:0x0000000000000000

        fs:0x0000000000000000        gs:0x0000000000000000

   fs_base:0x00007fae80a5d6a0   gs_base:0x0000000000000000

   orig_ax:0x00000000000000e8

# Display the exception context information on the PowerPC-based 32-bit device.

<Sysname> display exception context

Index 1 of 1

------------------------------

Crashed PID: 133 (routed)

Crash signal: SIGBUS

Crash time: Wed Apr 10 15:47:49 2013

Core file path:

cfa0:/core/node0_routed_133_7_20130410-154749_1365608869.core

#0  0x184720bc

#1  0x10006b4c

Backtrace stopped.

                          Registers' content

grp00: 0x000000ee 0x7ffd6ad0 0x1800f440 0x00000004

grp04: 0x7ffd6af8 0x0000000a 0xffffffff 0x184720bc

grp08: 0x0002d200 0x00000003 0x00000001 0x1847209c

grp12: 0x10006b4c 0x10020534 0xd6744100 0x00000000

grp16: 0x00000000 0xa0203ff0 0xa028b12c 0xa028b13c

grp20: 0xa028b148 0xa028b168 0xa028b178 0xa028b190

grp24: 0xa028b1a8 0xa028b1b8 0x00000000 0x7ffd6c08

grp28: 0x10006cac 0x7ffd6f92 0x184c1b84 0x7ffd6ae0

 

  nip:0x184720bc    lr:0x10006b4c    cr:0x38000022   ctr:0x1847209c

  msr:0x0002db00   xer:0x00000000   ret:0xfffffffc dsisr:0x08000000

  gr3:0x00000003    mq:0x00000000  trap:0x00000c00   dar:0x1833114c

# Display the exception context information on the PowerPC-based 64-bit device.

<Sysname> display exception context

Index 1 of 1

------------------------------

Crashed PID: 172 (routed)

Crash signal: SIGBUS

Crash time: Sat Sep 15 16:53:16 2007

Core file path:

cfa0:/core/node1_routed_172_7_20070915-165316_1189875196.core

#0  0x00000fff803c66b4

#1  0x0000000010009b94

#2  0x00000fff80401814

Backtrace stopped.

                          Registers' content

     grp00: 0x00000000000000ee 0x00000fffffd04840

     grp02: 0x00000fff80425c28 0x0000000000000004

     grp04: 0x00000fffffd048c0 0x000000000000000a

     grp06: 0xffffffffffffffff 0x00000fff803c66b4

     grp08: 0x000000008002d000 0x0000000000000000

     grp10: 0x0000000000000000 0x0000000000000000

     grp12: 0x0000000000000000 0x00000fff80a096b0

     grp14: 0x000000007b964c00 0x000000007b7d0000

     grp16: 0x0000000000000001 0x000000000000000b

     grp18: 0x0000000000000031 0x0000000000a205b8

     grp20: 0x0000000000a20677 0x0000000000000000

     grp22: 0x000000007bb91014 0x0000000000000000

     grp24: 0xc0000000005ae1c8 0x0000000000000000

     grp26: 0xc0000001f00bff20 0xc0000001f00b0000

     grp28: 0x00000fffffd04a30 0x000000001001aed8

     grp30: 0x00000fffffd04fae 0x00000fffffd04840

 

       nip:0x00000fff803c66b4        lr:0x0000000010009b94

        cr:0x0000000058000482       ctr:0x00000fff803c66ac

       msr:0x000000008002d000       xer:0x0000000000000000

       ret:0xfffffffffffffffc     dsisr:0x0000000000000000

       gr3:0x0000000000000003     softe:0x0000000000000001

      trap:0x0000000000000c00       dar:0x00000fff8059d14c

# Display the exception context information on the MIPS-based 32-bit device.

<Sysname> display exception context

Index 1 of 1

------------------------------

Crashed PID: 182 (routed)

Crash signal: SIGBUS

Crash time: Sun Jan  2 08:11:38 2013

Core file path:

cfa0:/core/node4_routed_182_10_20130102-081138_1293955898.core

#0  0x2af2faf4

#1  0x00406d8c

Backtrace stopped.

                          Registers' content

 zero:0x00000000   at:0x1000dc00   v0:0x00000004   v1:0x00000003

   a0:0x00000003   a1:0x7fd267e8   a2:0x0000000a   a3:0x00000001

   t0:0x00000000   t1:0xcf08fa14   t2:0x80230510   t3:0xfffffff8

   t4:0x69766520   t5:0x00000000   t6:0x63cc6000   t7:0x44617461

   s0:0x7fd26f81   s1:0x00401948   s2:0x7fd268f8   s3:0x803e1db0

   s4:0x803e1da0   s5:0x803e1d88   s6:0x803e1d70   s7:0x803e1d60

   t8:0x00000008   t9:0x2af2fae0   k0:0x00000000   k1:0x00000000

   gp:0x2af9a3a0   sp:0x7fd267c0   s8:0x7fd267c0   ra:0x00406d8c

   sr:0x0000dc13   lo:0xef9db265   hi:0x0000003f  bad:0x2add2010

cause:0x00800020   pc:0x2af2faf4

# Display the exception context information on the MIPS-based 64-bit device.

<Sysname> display exception context

Index 1 of 1

------------------------------

Crashed PID: 270 (routed)

Crash signal: SIGBUS

Crash time: Wed Mar 27 12:39:12 2013

Core file path:

cfa0:/core/node16_routed_270_10_20130327-123912_1364387952.core

#0  0x0000005555a3bcb4

#1  0x0000000120006c1c

Backtrace stopped.

                          Registers' content

      zero:0x0000000000000000        at:0x0000000000000014

        v0:0x0000000000000004        v1:0x0000000000000003

        a0:0x0000000000000003        a1:0x000000ffff899d90

        a2:0x000000000000000a        a3:0x0000000000000001

        a4:0x0000005555a9b4e0        a5:0x0000000000000000

        a6:0xffffffff8021349c        a7:0x20696e206368616e

        t0:0x0000000000000000        t1:0xffffffff80105068

        t2:0xffffffff80213890        t3:0x0000000000000008

        s0:0x0000005555a99c40        s1:0x000000ffff89af5f

        s2:0x0000000120007320        s3:0x0000005555a5f470

        s4:0x000000ffff899f80        s5:0xffffffff803cc6c0

        s6:0xffffffff803cc6a8        s7:0xffffffff803cc690

        t8:0x0000000000000002        t9:0x0000005555a3bc98

        k0:0x0000000000000000        k1:0x0000000000000000

        gp:0x0000000120020460        sp:0x000000ffff899d70

        s8:0x000000ffff899d80        ra:0x0000000120006c1c

        sr:0x000000000400fff3        lo:0xdf3b645a1cac08c9

        hi:0x000000000000007f       bad:0x000000555589ba84

     cause:0x0000000000800020        pc:0x0000005555a3bcb4

Table 1 Command output

Filed

Description

Crashed PID

ID of the crashed process.

Crash signal

Signals that led to the crash:

·     SIGABRT—Abort.

·     SIGBUSBus error.

·     SIGFPE—Erroneous arithmetic operation.

·     SIGILL—Illegal hardware instructions.

·     SIGQUIT—Quit signal sent by the controlling terminal.

·     SIGSEGV—Invalid memory access.

·     SIGSYS—Invalid system call.

·     SIGTRAPTrap message.

·     SIGXCPU—CPU usage limit exceeded.

·     SIGXFSZFile size limit exceeded.

·     SIGUNKNOWUnknown reason.

Crash time

Time when the crash occurred.

Core file path

Directory where the core file is saved.

Backtrace stopped

All stack information has been displayed.

 

Related commands

reset exception context

display exception filepath

Use display exception filepath to display the core file directory.

Syntax

display exception filepath [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays the core file directory on the master device.  

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# (IRF-incapable devices.) Display the core file directory on the device.

<Sysname> display exception filepath

The exception filepath is flash:.

# (IRF-capable devices.) Display the core file directory on the master device.

<Sysname> display exception filepath

The exception filepath on slot 0 is cfa0:.

# (IRF-capable devices.) Display the core file directory on a member device.

<Sysname> display exception filepath slot 1

The exception filepath on slot 1 is NULL.

display kernel deadloop

Use display kernel deadloop to display kernel thread deadloop information.

Syntax

display kernel deadloop show-number [ offset ] [ verbose ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

show-number: Specifies the number of deadloops to display, in the range of 1 to 20.

offset: Specifies the offset between the starting deadloop and the latest deadloop, in the range of 0 to 19. The default value is 0.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays kernel thread deadloop information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display brief information about the latest kernel thread deadloop.

<Sysname> display kernel deadloop 1

----------------- Deadloop record 1 -----------------

Description          : BUG: soft lockup - CPU#0 stuck for 61! [comsh: 16306]

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Instruction address  : 0x4004158c

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Chassis              : 0

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

# Display detailed information about the latest kernel thread deadloop.

<Sysname> display kernel deadloop 1 verbose

----------------- Deadloop record 1 -----------------

Description          : BUG: soft lockup - CPU#0 stuck for 61! [comsh: 16306]

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Instruction address  : 0x4004158c

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Chassis              : 0

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

 

Last 5 thread switches : migration/0 (11:16:00.823018)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833018)-->

                         kthreadd (11:16:00.833518)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833550)-->

                         disk (11:16:00.833560)

 

Register content:

Reg:       r0, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r1, Val = 0xe2be5ea0 ;

Reg:       r2, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r3, Val = 0x77777777 ;

Reg:       r4, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r5, Val = 0x00001492 ;

Reg:       r6, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r7, Val = 0x0000ffff ;

Reg:       r8, Val = 0x77777777 ; Reg:       r9, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r10, Val = 0x00000001 ; Reg:      r11, Val = 0x0000002c ;

Reg:      r12, Val = 0x057d9484 ; Reg:      r13, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r14, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r15, Val = 0x02000000 ;

Reg:      r16, Val = 0xe2be5f00 ; Reg:      r17, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r18, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r19, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r20, Val = 0x024c10f8 ; Reg:      r21, Val = 0x057d9244 ;

Reg:      r22, Val = 0x00002000 ; Reg:      r23, Val = 0x0000002c ;

Reg:      r24, Val = 0x00000002 ; Reg:      r25, Val = 0x24000024 ;

Reg:      r26, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r27, Val = 0x057d9484 ;

Reg:      r28, Val = 0x0000002c ; Reg:      r29, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r30, Val = 0x0000002c ; Reg:      r31, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:       cr, Val = 0x84000028 ; Reg:      nip, Val = 0x057d9550 ;

Reg:      xer, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       lr, Val = 0x0186eff0 ;

Reg:      ctr, Val = 0x682f7344 ; Reg:      msr, Val = 0x00784b5c ;

Reg:     trap, Val = 0x0000b030 ; Reg:      dar, Val = 0x77777777 ;

Reg:    dsisr, Val = 0x40000000 ; Reg:   result, Val = 0x00020300 ;

 

Dump stack (total 1024 bytes, 16 bytes/line):

0xe2be5ea0: 02 be 5e c0 24 00 00 24 00 00 00 00 05 7d 94 84

0xe2be5eb0: 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 28 05 8d 34 c4

0xe2be5ec0: 02 be 60 a0 01 86 ef f0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ed0: 02 04 05 b4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ee0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ef0: 95 47 73 35 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f00: a0 e1 64 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f10: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be5f20: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f30: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be5f40: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 44 b3 a4

0xe2be5f50: 02 be 5f 90 00 00 00 08 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 08

0xe2be5f60: 02 be 5f 80 00 ac 1b 14 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f70: 05 b4 5f 90 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5f80: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b f4 00 00 00 00 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5f90: 00 03 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30

0xe2be5fa0: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b 14 61 f1 2e ae 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5fb0: 02 44 b3 74 02 be 5f d0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5fc0: 02 be 60 60 01 74 ff f8 00 00 00 00 00 00 08 00

0xe2be5fd0: 02 be 5f f0 00 e8 93 7e 02 be 5f f8 02 be 5f fc

0xe2be5fe0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 18

0xe2be5ff0: 02 be 60 10 00 e9 65 98 00 00 00 58 00 00 2a 4f

0xe2be6000: 02 be 60 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6010: 02 be 60 40 00 e8 c6 a0 00 00 11 17 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6020: 02 be 60 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6030: 02 27 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6040: 02 be 60 60 00 00 00 01 00 00 b0 30 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6050: 00 00 00 04 02 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be6060: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6070: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be6080: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 be 61 70

0xe2be6090: 00 00 00 00 02 21 00 00 05 8d 34 c4 05 7d 92 44

 

Call trace:

Function Address = 0x8012a4b4

Function Address = 0x8017989c

Function Address = 0x80179b30

Function Address = 0x80127438

Function Address = 0x8012d734

Function Address = 0x80100a00

Function Address = 0xe0071004

Function Address = 0x8016ce0c

Function Address = 0x801223a0

  

Instruction dump:

41a2fe9c 812300ec 800200ec 7f890000 409efe8c 80010014 540b07b9 40a2fe80

4bfffe6c 80780290 7f64db78 4804ea35 <807f002c> 38800000 38a00080 3863000c

Table 2 Command output

Field

Description

Description

Description for the kernel thread deadloop, including the CPU number, thread running time, thread name, and thread number.

Recorded at

Time when the kernel thread deadloop was recorded on the master device, with microsecond precision.

Occurred at

Time when the kernel thread deadloop occurred, with microsecond precision.

Instruction address

Instruction address for the kernel thread deadloop.

Thread

Name and number of the kernel thread deadloop.

Context

Context for the kernel thread deadloop.

Slot

IRF member ID of the device where the kernel thread ran.

Cpu

Number of the CPU where the kernel thread ran.

VCPU ID

Number of the CPU core where the kernel thread ran.

CPU ID

Number of the CPU where the kernel thread ran.

Kernel module info

Information about kernel modules that had been loaded when the kernel thread deadloop was detected, including kernel module name and memory address.

Last 5 thread switches

Last five kernel thread switches on the CPU before the kernel thread deadloop was detected, including kernel thread name and kernel thread switching time with microsecond precision.

Register content

Register information:

·     Reg—Name of a register.

·     Val—Value saved in a register.

Dump stack

Stack information.

Call trace

Function call stack information, which shows the instruction address of a called function at each level.

Instruction dump

Instruction code when the kernel thread deadloop was detected. ffffffff indicates an illegitimate instruction code.

No information to display

No kernel thread deadloop information.

 

Related commands

reset kernel deadloop

display kernel deadloop configuration

Use display kernel deadloop configuration to display kernel thread deadloop detection configuration.

Syntax

display kernel deadloop configuration [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays kernel thread deadloop detection configuration for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display kernel thread deadloop detection configuration.

<Sysname> display kernel deadloop configuration

Thread dead loop detection: Enabled

Dead loop timer (in seconds): 60

Threads excluded from monitoring: 1

  TID:     15   Name: co0   

Table 3 Command output

Field

Description

Dead loop timer (in seconds): n

Time interval (in seconds) to identify a kernel thread deadloop. A kernel thread deadloop occurs if a kernel thread runs more than n seconds.

Threads excluded from monitoring

Kernel threads excluded from kernel thread deadloop detection. This field appears only if the monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread command is configured.

Name

Kernel thread name.

TID

Kernel thread number.

No thread is excluded from monitoring

All kernel threads are monitored by kernel thread deadloop detection.

 

display kernel exception

Use display kernel exception to display kernel thread exception information.

Syntax

display kernel exception show-number [ offset ] [ verbose ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

show-number: Specifies the number of kernel exceptions to display, in the range of 1 to 20.

offset: Specifies the offset between the starting exception and the latest exception, in the range of 0 to 19. The default value is 0.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays kernel thread exception information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

If an exception occurs to a running kernel thread, the system automatically records the exception information.

Examples

# Display brief information about the latest kernel thread exception.

<Sysname> display kernel exception 1

----------------- Exception record 1 -----------------

Description          : Oops[#0]

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Instruction address  : 0x4004158c

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

                       module name (disk) module address (0xe00bd000)

# Display detailed information about the latest kernel thread exception.

<Sysname> display kernel exception 1 verbose

----------------- Exception record 1 -----------------

Description          : Oops[#0]

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Instruction address  : 0x4004158c

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

                       module name (12500) module address (0xe00bd000)

 

Last 5 thread switches : migration/0 (11:16:00.823018)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833018)-->

                         kthreadd (11:16:00.833518)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833550)-->

                         disk (11:16:00.833560)

 

Register content:

Reg:       r0, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r1, Val = 0xe2be5ea0 ;

Reg:       r2, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r3, Val = 0x77777777 ;

Reg:       r4, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r5, Val = 0x00001492 ;

Reg:       r6, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r7, Val = 0x0000ffff ;

Reg:       r8, Val = 0x77777777 ; Reg:       r9, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r10, Val = 0x00000001 ; Reg:      r11, Val = 0x0000002c ;

Reg:      r12, Val = 0x057d9484 ; Reg:      r13, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r14, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r15, Val = 0x02000000 ;

Reg:      r16, Val = 0xe2be5f00 ; Reg:      r17, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r18, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r19, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r20, Val = 0x024c10f8 ; Reg:      r21, Val = 0x057d9244 ;

Reg:      r22, Val = 0x00002000 ; Reg:      r23, Val = 0x0000002c ;

Reg:      r24, Val = 0x00000002 ; Reg:      r25, Val = 0x24000024 ;

Reg:      r26, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r27, Val = 0x057d9484 ;

Reg:      r28, Val = 0x0000002c ; Reg:      r29, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r30, Val = 0x0000002c ; Reg:      r31, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:       cr, Val = 0x84000028 ; Reg:      nip, Val = 0x057d9550 ;

Reg:      xer, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       lr, Val = 0x0186eff0 ;

Reg:      ctr, Val = 0x682f7344 ; Reg:      msr, Val = 0x00784b5c ;

Reg:     trap, Val = 0x0000b030 ; Reg:      dar, Val = 0x77777777 ;

Reg:    dsisr, Val = 0x40000000 ; Reg:   result, Val = 0x00020300 ;

 

Dump stack (total 1024 bytes, 16 bytes/line):

0xe2be5ea0: 02 be 5e c0 24 00 00 24 00 00 00 00 05 7d 94 84

0xe2be5eb0: 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 28 05 8d 34 c4

0xe2be5ec0: 02 be 60 a0 01 86 ef f0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ed0: 02 04 05 b4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ee0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ef0: 95 47 73 35 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f00: a0 e1 64 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f10: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be5f20: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f30: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be5f40: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 44 b3 a4

0xe2be5f50: 02 be 5f 90 00 00 00 08 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 08

0xe2be5f60: 02 be 5f 80 00 ac 1b 14 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f70: 05 b4 5f 90 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5f80: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b f4 00 00 00 00 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5f90: 00 03 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30

0xe2be5fa0: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b 14 61 f1 2e ae 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5fb0: 02 44 b3 74 02 be 5f d0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5fc0: 02 be 60 60 01 74 ff f8 00 00 00 00 00 00 08 00

0xe2be5fd0: 02 be 5f f0 00 e8 93 7e 02 be 5f f8 02 be 5f fc

0xe2be5fe0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 18

0xe2be5ff0: 02 be 60 10 00 e9 65 98 00 00 00 58 00 00 2a 4f

0xe2be6000: 02 be 60 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6010: 02 be 60 40 00 e8 c6 a0 00 00 11 17 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6020: 02 be 60 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6030: 02 27 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6040: 02 be 60 60 00 00 00 01 00 00 b0 30 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6050: 00 00 00 04 02 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be6060: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6070: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be6080: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 be 61 70

0xe2be6090: 00 00 00 00 02 21 00 00 05 8d 34 c4 05 7d 92 44

 

Call trace:

Function Address = 0x8012a4b4

Function Address = 0x8017989c

Function Address = 0x80179b30

Function Address = 0x80127438

Function Address = 0x8012d734

Function Address = 0x80100a00

Function Address = 0xe0071004

Function Address = 0x8016ce0c

Function Address = 0x801223a0

  

Instruction dump:

41a2fe9c 812300ec 800200ec 7f890000 409efe8c 80010014 540b07b9 40a2fe80

4bfffe6c 80780290 7f64db78 4804ea35 <807f002c> 38800000 38a00080 3863000c

For detailed information about the command output, see Table 2

Related commands

reset kernel exception

display kernel reboot

Use display kernel reboot to display reboot information for the device.

Syntax

display kernel reboot show-number [ offset ] [ verbose ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

show-number: Specifies the number of kernel thread reboots to display, in the range of 1 to 20.

offset: Specifies the offset between the starting reboot and the latest reboot, in the range of 0 to 19. The default value is 0.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays kernel thread reboot information for the master device. Reboot information for member devices is recorded in the memory of the master device. If the master device is powered off, the reboot information is lost.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display brief information about the latest reboot.

<Sysname> display kernel reboot 1

----------------- Reboot record 1 -----------------

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Reason               : 0x31

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

                       module name (12500) module address (0xe00bd000)

# Display detailed information about the latest kernel thread reboot.

<Sysname> display kernel reboot 1 verbose

----------------- Reboot record 1 -----------------

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Reason               : 0x31

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

                       module name (12500) module address (0xe00bd000)

 

Last 5 thread switches : migration/0 (11:16:00.823018)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833018)-->

                         kthreadd (11:16:00.833518)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833550)-->

                         disk (11:16:00.833560)

 

Dump stack (total 1024 bytes, 16 bytes/line):

0xe2be5ea0: 02 be 5e c0 24 00 00 24 00 00 00 00 05 7d 94 84

0xe2be5eb0: 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 28 05 8d 34 c4

0xe2be5ec0: 02 be 60 a0 01 86 ef f0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ed0: 02 04 05 b4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ee0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ef0: 95 47 73 35 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f00: a0 e1 64 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f10: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be5f20: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f30: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be5f40: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 44 b3 a4

0xe2be5f50: 02 be 5f 90 00 00 00 08 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 08

0xe2be5f60: 02 be 5f 80 00 ac 1b 14 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f70: 05 b4 5f 90 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5f80: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b f4 00 00 00 00 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5f90: 00 03 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30

0xe2be5fa0: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b 14 61 f1 2e ae 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5fb0: 02 44 b3 74 02 be 5f d0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5fc0: 02 be 60 60 01 74 ff f8 00 00 00 00 00 00 08 00

0xe2be5fd0: 02 be 5f f0 00 e8 93 7e 02 be 5f f8 02 be 5f fc

0xe2be5fe0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 18

0xe2be5ff0: 02 be 60 10 00 e9 65 98 00 00 00 58 00 00 2a 4f

0xe2be6000: 02 be 60 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6010: 02 be 60 40 00 e8 c6 a0 00 00 11 17 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6020: 02 be 60 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6030: 02 27 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6040: 02 be 60 60 00 00 00 01 00 00 b0 30 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6050: 00 00 00 04 02 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be6060: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6070: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be6080: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 be 61 70

0xe2be6090: 00 00 00 00 02 21 00 00 05 8d 34 c4 05 7d 92 44

 

Call trace:

Function Address = 0x8012a4b4

Function Address = 0x8017989c

Function Address = 0x80179b30

Function Address = 0x80127438

Function Address = 0x8012d734

Function Address = 0x80100a00

Function Address = 0xe0071004

Function Address = 0x8016ce0c

Function Address = 0x801223a0

Table 4 Command output

Field

Description

Recorded at

Time when the reboot was recorded on the master device, with microsecond precision.

Occurred at

Time when the reboot occurred, with microsecond precision.

Reason

Reboot reason.

Thread

Name and number of the kernel thread that was running when the reboot occurred.

Context

Context where the reboot occurred.

Slot

IRF member ID of the device that triggered the reboot.

CPU ID

Number of the CPU that triggered the reboot.

Kernel module info

Information about kernel modules that had been loaded when the kernel thread rebooted, including kernel module name and memory address.

Last 5 thread switches

Last five kernel thread switches on the CPU before the kernel thread rebooted, including kernel thread name and kernel thread switching time, with microsecond precision.

Dump stack

Stack information for the threads that were running when the reboot occurred.

Call trace

Function call stack information for the threads that were running when the reboot occurred.

No information to display

No kernel thread reboot information exists.

 

Related commands

reset kernel reboot

display kernel starvation

Use display kernel starvation to display kernel thread starvation information.

Syntax

display kernel starvation show-number [ offset ] [ verbose ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

show-number: Specifies the number of thread starvations to display, in the range of 1 to 20.

offset: Specifies the offset between the starting starvation and the latest starvation, in the range of 0 to 19. The default value is 0.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays kernel thread starvation information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display brief information about the latest kernel thread starvation.

<Sysname> display kernel starvation 1

----------------- Starvation record 1 -----------------

Description          : INFO: task comsh: 16306 blocked for more than 10 seconds.

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Instruction address  : 0x4004158c

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

                       module name (12500) module address (0xe00bd000)

# Display detailed information about the latest kernel thread starvation.

<Sysname> display kernel starvation 1 verbose

----------------- Starvation record 1 -----------------

Description          : INFO: task comsh: 16306 blocked for more than 10 seconds.

Recorded at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Occurred at          : 2013-05-01  11:16:00.823018

Instruction address  : 0x4004158c

Thread               : comsh (TID: 16306)

Context              : thread context

Slot                 : 0

Cpu                  : 0

VCPU ID              : 0

Kernel module info   : module name (mrpnc) module address (0xe332a000)

                       module name (12500) module address (0xe00bd000)

 

Last 5 thread switches : migration/0 (11:16:00.823018)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833018)-->

                         kthreadd (11:16:00.833518)-->

                         swapper (11:16:00.833550)-->

                         disk (11:16:00.833560)

 

Register content:

Reg:       r0, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r1, Val = 0xe2be5ea0 ;

Reg:       r2, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r3, Val = 0x77777777 ;

Reg:       r4, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r5, Val = 0x00001492 ;

Reg:       r6, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       r7, Val = 0x0000ffff ;

Reg:       r8, Val = 0x77777777 ; Reg:       r9, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r10, Val = 0x00000001 ; Reg:      r11, Val = 0x0000002c ;

Reg:      r12, Val = 0x057d9484 ; Reg:      r13, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r14, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r15, Val = 0x02000000 ;

Reg:      r16, Val = 0xe2be5f00 ; Reg:      r17, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r18, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r19, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r20, Val = 0x024c10f8 ; Reg:      r21, Val = 0x057d9244 ;

Reg:      r22, Val = 0x00002000 ; Reg:      r23, Val = 0x0000002c ;

Reg:      r24, Val = 0x00000002 ; Reg:      r25, Val = 0x24000024 ;

Reg:      r26, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:      r27, Val = 0x057d9484 ;

Reg:      r28, Val = 0x0000002c ; Reg:      r29, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:      r30, Val = 0x0000002c ; Reg:      r31, Val = 0x00000000 ;

Reg:       cr, Val = 0x84000028 ; Reg:      nip, Val = 0x057d9550 ;

Reg:      xer, Val = 0x00000000 ; Reg:       lr, Val = 0x0186eff0 ;

Reg:      ctr, Val = 0x682f7344 ; Reg:      msr, Val = 0x00784b5c ;

Reg:     trap, Val = 0x0000b030 ; Reg:      dar, Val = 0x77777777 ;

Reg:    dsisr, Val = 0x40000000 ; Reg:   result, Val = 0x00020300 ;

 

Dump stack (total 1024 bytes, 16 bytes/line):

0xe2be5ea0: 02 be 5e c0 24 00 00 24 00 00 00 00 05 7d 94 84

0xe2be5eb0: 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 28 05 8d 34 c4

0xe2be5ec0: 02 be 60 a0 01 86 ef f0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ed0: 02 04 05 b4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ee0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5ef0: 95 47 73 35 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f00: a0 e1 64 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f10: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be5f20: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f30: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be5f40: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 44 b3 a4

0xe2be5f50: 02 be 5f 90 00 00 00 08 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 08

0xe2be5f60: 02 be 5f 80 00 ac 1b 14 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be5f70: 05 b4 5f 90 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5f80: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b f4 00 00 00 00 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5f90: 00 03 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 5f e0 00 00 00 30

0xe2be5fa0: 02 be 5f c0 00 ac 1b 14 61 f1 2e ae 02 45 00 00

0xe2be5fb0: 02 44 b3 74 02 be 5f d0 00 00 00 30 02 be 5f e0

0xe2be5fc0: 02 be 60 60 01 74 ff f8 00 00 00 00 00 00 08 00

0xe2be5fd0: 02 be 5f f0 00 e8 93 7e 02 be 5f f8 02 be 5f fc

0xe2be5fe0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 18

0xe2be5ff0: 02 be 60 10 00 e9 65 98 00 00 00 58 00 00 2a 4f

0xe2be6000: 02 be 60 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6010: 02 be 60 40 00 e8 c6 a0 00 00 11 17 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6020: 02 be 60 40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6030: 02 27 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 60 68

0xe2be6040: 02 be 60 60 00 00 00 01 00 00 b0 30 02 be 60 98

0xe2be6050: 00 00 00 04 02 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 e9 00 00

0xe2be6060: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

0xe2be6070: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 be 66 c0 02 be 66 d0

0xe2be6080: 02 be 61 e0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 02 be 61 70

0xe2be6090: 00 00 00 00 02 21 00 00 05 8d 34 c4 05 7d 92 44

 

Call trace:

Function Address = 0x8012a4b4

Function Address = 0x8017989c

Function Address = 0x80179b30

Function Address = 0x80127438

Function Address = 0x8012d734

Function Address = 0x80100a00

Function Address = 0xe0071004

Function Address = 0x8016ce0c

Function Address = 0x801223a0

  

Instruction dump:

41a2fe9c 812300ec 800200ec 7f890000 409efe8c 80010014 540b07b9 40a2fe80

4bfffe6c 80780290 7f64db78 4804ea35 <807f002c> 38800000 38a00080 3863000c

For more information about the command output, see Table 2

Related commands

reset kernel starvation

display kernel starvation configuration

Use display kernel starvation configuration to display kernel thread starvation detection configuration.

Syntax

display kernel starvation configuration [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays kernel thread starvation detection configuration for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display kernel thread starvation detection configuration.

<Sysname> display kernel starvation configuration

Thread starvation detection: Enabled

Starvation timer (in seconds): 10

Threads excluded from monitoring: 1

  TID:    123   Name: co0

Table 5 Command output

Field

Description

Starvation timer (in seconds): n

Time interval (in seconds) to identify a kernel thread starvation. A kernel thread starvation occurs if a kernel thread does not run within n seconds.

Threads excluded from monitoring

Kernel threads excluded from kernel thread starvation detection.

Name

Kernel thread name.

TID

Kernel thread number.

 

Related commands

·     monitor kernel starvation enable

·     monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread

·     monitor kernel starvation time

display process

Use display process to display process state information.

Syntax

display process [ all | job job-id | name process-name ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

all: Specifies all processes. With the all keyword or without any parameters, the command displays state information for all processes.

job job-id: Specifies a process by its job ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647. Each process has a fixed job ID.

name process-name: Specifies a process by its name, a case-insensitive string of 1 to 15 characters that must not contain question marks or spaces.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command displays process state information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display state information for process scmd.

<Sysname> display process name scmd

                             Job ID: 1

                                PID: 1

                         Parent JID: 0

                         Parent PID: 0

                    Executable path: -

                           Instance: 0

                            Respawn: OFF

                      Respawn count: 1

             Max. spawns per minute: 0

                       Last started: Wed Jun  1 14:45:46 2013

                      Process state: sleeping

                          Max. core: 0

                               ARGS: -

    TID  LAST_CPU    Stack      PRI    State   HH:MM:SS:MESC  Name

      1      0          0K      120      S     0:0:5:220      scmd

Table 6 Command output

Field

Description

Job ID

Job ID of the process. The job ID never changes.

PID

Number of the process. The number identifies the process, and it might change as the process restarts.

Parent JID

Job ID of the parent process.

Parent PID

Number of the parent process.

Executable path

Executable path of the process. For a kernel thread, this field displays a hyphen (-).

Instance

Instance number of the process. Whether a process can run multiple instances depends on the software implementation.

Respawn

Indicates whether the process restarts when an error occurs:

·     ONThe process automatically restarts.

·     OFF—The process does not automatically restarts.

Respawn count

Times that the process has restarted. The starting value is 1.

Max. spawns per minute

Maximum number of times that the process can restart within one minute. If the threshold is reached, the system automatically shuts down the process.

Last started

Time when the latest restart occurred.

Process state

State of the process:

·     running—Running or waiting in the queue.

·     sleepingInterruptible sleep.

·     traced or stoppedStopped.

·     uninterruptible sleepUninterruptible sleep.

·     zombieThe process has quit, but some resources are not released.

Max. core

Maximum number of core files that the process can create. 0 indicates that the process never creates a core file. A process creates a core file after it abnormally restarts. If the number of core files reaches the maximum value, no more core files are created. Core files are helpful for troubleshooting.

ARGS

Parameters carried by the process during startup. If the process carries no parameters, this field displays a hyphen (-).

TID

Thread ID.

LAST_CPU

Number of the CPU on which the process is last scheduled.

Stack

Stack size.

PRI

Thread priority.

State

Thread state:

·     R—Running.

·     SSleeping.

·     T—Traced or stopped.

·     D—Uninterruptible sleep.

·     Z—Zombie.

HH:MM:SS:MESC

Running time since the latest start.

Name

Process name.

 

# Display state information for all processes.

<Sysname> display process all

    JID    PID %CPU %MEM STAT PRI     TTY HH:MM:SS COMMAND

      1      1  0.0  0.0   S  120      -  00:00:04 scmd

      2      2  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [kthreadd]

      3      3  0.0  0.0   S   99      -  00:00:00 [migration/0]

      4      4  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:05 [ksoftirqd/0]

      5      5  0.0  0.0   S   99      -  00:00:00 [watchdog/0]

      6      6  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [events/0]

      7      7  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [khelper]

      8      8  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [kblockd/0]

      9      9  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [ata/0]

     10     10  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [ata_aux]

     11     11  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [kseriod]

     12     12  0.0  0.0   S  120      -  00:00:00 [vzmond]

     13     13  0.0  0.0   S  120      -  00:00:00 [pdflush]

     14     14  0.0  0.0   S  120      -  00:00:00 [pdflush]

     15     15  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [kswapd0]

     16     16  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [aio/0]

     17     17  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [scsi_eh_0]

     18     18  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [scsi_eh_1]

     19     19  0.0  0.0   S  115      -  00:00:00 [scsi_eh_2]

     35     35  0.0  0.0   D  100      -  00:00:00 [lipc_topology]

---- More ----              

Table 7 Command output

Field

Description

JID

Job ID of a process. It never changes.

PID

Number of a process.

%CPU

CPU usage in percentage (%).

%MEM

Memory usage in percentage (%).

STAT

State of a process:

·     R—Running.

·     SSleeping.

·     T—Traced or stopped.

·     D—Uninterruptible sleep.

·     Z—Zombie.

PRI

Priority of a process for scheduling.

TTY

TTY used by a process.

HH:MM:SS

Running time since the latest start.

COMMAND

Name and parameters of a process. If square brackets ([ ]) exist in a process name, the process is a kernel thread.

 

display process cpu

Use display process cpu to display CPU usage for all processes.

Syntax

display process cpu [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display CPU usage for all processes.

<Sysname> display process cpu

CPU utilization in 5 secs: 16.8%; 1 min: 4.7%; 5 mins: 4.7%

    JID      5Sec      1Min      5Min    Name

      1      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    scmd

      2      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [kthreadd]

      3      0.1%      0.0%      0.0%    [ksoftirqd/0]

      4      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [watchdog/0]

      5      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [events/0]

      6      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [khelper]

     29      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [kblockd/0]

     49      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [vzmond]

     52      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [pdflush]

     53      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [pdflush]

     54      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [kswapd0]

    110      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [aio/0]

    712      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [mtdblockd]

    719      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [TNetJob]

    720      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [TMTH]

    727      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [CF]

    730      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [DIBC]

    752      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [lipc_topology]

    762      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [MNET]

    763      0.0%      0.0%      0.0%    [SYSM]

---- More ----

Table 8 Command output

Field

Description

CPU utilization in 5 secs: 16.8%; 1 min: 4.7%; 5 mins: 4.7%

System CPU usage within the last 5 seconds, 1 minute, and 5 minutes.

JID

Job ID of a process. It never changes.

5Sec

CPU usage of the process within the last 5 seconds.

1Min

CPU usage of the process within the last minute.

5Min

CPU usage of the process within the last 5 minutes.

Name

Name of the process. If square brackets ([ ]) exist in a process name, the process is a kernel thread.

 

display process log

Use display process log to display log information for all user processes.

Syntax

display process log [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Display log information for all user processes.

<Sysname> display process log

Process       JobID  PID    Abort Core Exit Kill StartTime      EndTime        

knotify       92     92     N     N    0    36   12-17 07:10:27 12-17 07:10:27 

knotify       93     93     N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:27 12-17 07:10:27 

automount     94     94     N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:27 12-17 07:10:28 

knotify       111    111    N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:28 12-17 07:10:28 

comsh         121    121    N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:30 12-17 07:10:30 

knotify       152    152    N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:31 12-17 07:10:31 

autocfgd      155    155    N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:31 12-17 07:10:31 

pkg_update    122    122    N     N    0    --   12-17 07:10:30 12-17 07:10:31

Table 9 Command output

Field

Description

Process

Name of a user process.

JobID

Job ID of a user process.

PID

ID of a user process.

Abort

Indicates whether the process exited abnormally:

·     YYes.

·     NNo.

Core

Indicates whether the process can generate core files:

·     Y—Yes.

·     N—No.

Exit

Process exit code. A number indicates the process exit code. -- indicates no exit code exists and the process is disabled by the signal.

Kill

Code of the signal that killed the process. A number indicates the code of the signal that killed the process. -- indicates no kill signal code exists. The process exits, instead of being killed by the signal.

StartTime

Time when the user process started.

EndTime

Time when the user process ended.

 

display process memory

Use display process memory to display memory usage for all user processes.

Syntax

display process memory [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

When a user process starts, it requests the following types of memory from the system:

·     Text memory—Stores code for the user process.

·     Data memory—Stores data for the user process.

·     Stack memory—Stores temporary data.

·     Dynamic memoryHeap memory dynamically assigned and released by the system according to the needs of the user process. To view dynamic memory information, execute the display process memory heap command.

Examples

# Display memory usage for all user processes.

<Sysname> display process memory

   JID       Text      Data      Stack    Dynamic    Name

     1        384      1800         16         36    scmd

     2          0         0          0          0    [kthreadd]

     3          0         0          0          0    [ksoftirqd/0]

     4          0         0          0          0    [watchdog/0]

     5          0         0          0          0    [events/0]

     6          0         0          0          0    [khelper]

    29          0         0          0          0    [kblockd/0]

    49          0         0          0          0    [vzmond]

    52          0         0          0          0    [pdflush]

---- More ----

Table 10 Command output

Field

Description

JID

Job ID of a process. It never changes.

Text

Text memory used by the user process, in KB. The value for a kernel thread is 0.

Data

Data memory used by the user process, in KB. The value for a kernel thread is 0.

Stack

Stack memory used by the user process, in KB. The value for a kernel thread is 0.

Dynamic

Dynamic memory used by the user process, in KB. The value for a kernel thread is 0.

Name

Name of the user process. If square brackets ([ ]) exist in a process name, the process is a kernel thread.

 

Related commands

·     display process memory heap

·     display process memory heap address

·     display process memory heap size

display process memory heap

Use display process memory heap to display heap memory usage for a user process.

Syntax

display process memory heap job job-id [ verbose ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

job job-id: Specifies a user process by its job ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

Heap memory comprises fixed-sized blocks such as 16-byte or 64-byte blocks. It stores data and variables used by the user process. When a user process starts, the system dynamically allocates heap memory to the process.

Each memory block has an address represented in hexadecimal format, which can be used to access the memory block. You can view memory block addresses by using the display process memory heap size command, and view memory block contents by using the display process memory heap address command.

Examples

# Display brief information about heap memory usage for the process identified by job ID 148.

<Sysname> display process memory heap job 148

Total virtual memory heap space(in bytes) :  2228224

Total physical memory heap space(in bytes) :  262144

Total allocated memory(in bytes)          :  161576

# Display detailed information about heap memory usage for the process identified by job ID 148.

<Sysname> display process memory heap job 148 verbose

Heap usage:

Size       Free      Used     Total     Free Ratio

16         8         52       60        13%

64         3         1262     1265      0.2%

128        2         207      209       1%

512        3         55       58        5.1%

4096       3         297      300       1%

8192       1         19       20        5%

81920      0         1        1         0%

Summary:

Total virtual memory heap space (in bytes)  :  2293760

Total physical memory heap space (in bytes) :  58368

Total allocated memory (in bytes)           :  42368

Table 11 Command output

Field

Description

Size

Size of each memory block, in bytes.

Free

Number of free memory blocks.

Used

Number of used memory blocks.

Total

Total number of memory blocks.

Free Ratio

Ratio of free memory to total memory. It helps identify fragment information.

 

Related commands

·     display process memory

·     display process memory heap address

·     display process memory heap size

display process memory heap address

Use display process memory heap address to display heap memory content starting from a specified memory block for a process.

Syntax

display process memory heap job job-id address starting-address length memory-length [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

job job-id: Specifies a user process by its job ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647.

address starting-address: Specifies the starting memory block by its address.

length memory-length: Specifies the memory block length in the range of 1 to 1024 bytes.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

When a user process runs abnormally, the command helps locate the problem.

Examples

# Display 128-byte memory block content starting from the memory block 0xb7e30580 for the process job 1.

<Sysname> display process memory heap job 1 address b7e30580 length 128

B7E30580:  14 00 EF FF 00 00 00 00 E4 39 E2 B7 7C 05 E3 B7  .........9..|...   

B7E30590:  14 00 EF FF 2F 73 62 69 6E 2F 73 6C 62 67 64 00  ..../sbin/slbgd.   

B7E305A0:  14 00 EF FF 00 00 00 00 44 3B E2 B7 8C 05 E3 B7  ........D;......   

B7E305B0:  14 00 EF FF 2F 73 62 69 6E 2F 6F 73 70 66 64 00  ..../sbin/ospfd.   

B7E305C0:  14 00 EF FF 00 00 00 00 A4 3C E2 B7 AC 05 E3 B7  .........<......   

B7E305D0:  14 00 EF FF 2F 73 62 69 6E 2F 6D 73 74 70 64 00  ..../sbin/mstpd.   

B7E305E0:  14 00 EF FF 00 00 00 00 04 3E E2 B7 CC 05 E3 B7  .........>......   

B7E305F0:  14 00 EF FF 2F 73 62 69 6E 2F 6E 74 70 64 00 00  ..../sbin/ntpd..

Related commands

·     display process memory heap

·     display process memory heap size

display process memory heap size

Use display process memory heap size to display the addresses of heap memory blocks with a specified size used by a process.

Syntax

display process memory heap job job-id size memory-size [ offset offset-size ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

Parameters

job job-id: Specifies a process by its job ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647.

size memory-size: Specifies the memory block size in the range of 1 to 4294967295.

offset offset-size: Specifies an offset in the range of 0 to 4294967295. The default value is 128. For example, suppose the system allocates 100 16-byte memory blocks to process job 1, and the process has used 66 blocks. Then if you execute the display process memory heap job 1 size 16 offset 50 command, the output shows the addresses of the 51st through 66th 16-byte blocks used by the process.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

The command displays memory block addresses in hexadecimal format. To view memory block content, execute the display process memory heap address command.

Examples

# Display the addresses of 16-byte memory blocks used by process job 1.

<Sysname> display process memory heap job 1 size 16

0xb7e300c0  0xb7e300d0  0xb7e300e0  0xb7e300f0

0xb7e30100  0xb7e30110  0xb7e30120  0xb7e30130

0xb7e30140  0xb7e30150  0xb7e30160  0xb7e30170

0xb7e30180  0xb7e30190  0xb7e301a0  0xb7e301b0

0xb7e301c0  0xb7e301d0  0xb7e301e0  0xb7e301f0

0xb7e30200  0xb7e30210  0xb7e30220  0xb7e30230

# Display the addresses of 16-byte memory blocks starting from the fifth block used by process job 1.

<Sysname> display process memory heap job 1 size 16 offset 4

0xb7e30100  0xb7e30110  0xb7e30120  0xb7e30130

0xb7e30140  0xb7e30150  0xb7e30160  0xb7e30170

0xb7e30180  0xb7e30190  0xb7e301a0  0xb7e301b0

0xb7e301c0  0xb7e301d0  0xb7e301e0  0xb7e301f0

0xb7e30200  0xb7e30210  0xb7e30220  0xb7e30230

Related commands

·     display process memory heap

·     display process memory heap address

exception filepath

Use exception filepath to specify the directory for saving core files.

Use undo exception filepath to remove the specified directory.

Syntax

exception filepath directory

undo exception filepath directory

Default

The core files are saved in the root directory of the storage media.

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

directory: Specifies the directory for saving core files, which can only be the root directory.

Usage guidelines

If no folder exists in the root directory, the system performs the following operations:

1.     Creates a folder for saving core files.

2.     Saves core files to the folder.

You can use the command to change the directory.

If no directory is specified or the specified directory is not accessible, the system cannot store core files.

Examples

# Specify the directory for saving core files.

<Sysname> exception filepath cfa0:/

Related commands

·     display exception filepath

·     process core

monitor kernel deadloop enable

Use monitor kernel deadloop enable to enable kernel thread deadloop detection.

Use undo monitor kernel deadloop enable to disable kernel thread deadloop detection.

Syntax

monitor kernel deadloop enable [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

undo monitor kernel deadloop enable [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Default

Kernel thread deadloop detection is disabled.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the master device is specified.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

Kernel threads share resources in kernel space. If a kernel thread monopolizes the CPU for a long time, other threads cannot run, resulting in a deadloop.

The command enables the device to detect deadloops. If a thread occupies the CPU regularly, the device considers that a deadloop has occurred. It outputs a deadloop message and reboots to remove the deadloop.

Inappropriate use of the command can cause service problems or system breakdown. Make sure you understand the impact of the command on your network before you use it.

Examples

# Enable kernel thread deadloop detection.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] monitor kernel deadloop enable

Related commands

·     display kernel deadloop

·     display kernel deadloop configuration

·     monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread

·     monitor kernel deadloop time

monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread

Use monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread to disable kernel thread deadloop detection for a kernel thread.

Use undo monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread to enable kernel thread deadloop detection for a kernel thread.

Syntax

monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread tid [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

undo monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread [ tid ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Default

Kernel thread deadloop detection monitors all kernel threads.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

tid: Specifies a kernel thread by its ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647. If no kernel thread is specified for the undo command, the default is restored.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the master device is specified.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

You can disable kernel thread deadloop detection for up to 128 kernel threads by executing the command.

Inappropriate use of the command can cause service problems or system breakdown. Make sure you understand the impact of the command on your network before you use it.

Examples

# Disable kernel thread deadloop detection for kernel thread 15.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname]monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread 15

Related commands

·     display kernel deadloop configuration

·     display kernel deadloop

·     monitor kernel deadloop enable

·     monitor kernel deadloop time

monitor kernel deadloop time

Use monitor kernel deadloop time to set the interval for identifying a kernel thread deadloop.

Use undo monitor kernel deadloop time to restore the default.

Syntax

monitor kernel deadloop time interval [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

undo monitor kernel deadloop time [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Default

The interval for identifying a kernel thread deadloop is 20 seconds.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

time interval: Specifies the interval for identifying a kernel thread deadloop, in the range of 1 to 65535 seconds.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the master device is specified.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

If a kernel thread runs for the specified interval, kernel thread deadloop detection considers that a deadloop has occurred. The system records the deadloop and restarts.

Inappropriate use of the command can cause service problems or system breakdown. Make sure you understand the impact of the command on your network before you use it.

Examples

# Set the interval for identifying a kernel thread deadloop to 8 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] monitor kernel deadloop time 8

Related commands

·     display kernel deadloop configuration

·     display kernel deadloop

·     monitor kernel deadloop enable

·     monitor kernel deadloop exclude-thread

monitor kernel starvation enable

Use monitor kernel starvation enable to enable kernel thread starvation detection.

Use undo monitor kernel starvation enable to disable kernel thread starvation detection.

Syntax

monitor kernel starvation enable [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

undo monitor kernel starvation enable [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Default

Kernel thread starvation detection is disabled.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the master device is specified.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

Starvation occurs when a thread is unable to access shared resources.

The command enables the system to detect and report thread starvation. If a thread is not executed within an interval, the system considers that a starvation has occurred, and outputs a starvation message.

Thread starvation does not impact system operation. A starved thread can automatically run when certain conditions are met.

Inappropriate use of the command can cause service problems or system breakdown. Make sure you understand the impact of the command on your network before you use it.

Examples

# Enable kernel thread starvation detection.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] monitor kernel starvation enable

Related commands

·     display kernel starvation configuration

·     display kernel starvation

·     monitor kernel starvation time

·     monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread

monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread

Use monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread to disable kernel thread starvation detection for a kernel thread.

Use undo monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread to enable kernel thread starvation detection for a kernel thread.

Syntax

monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread tid [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

undo monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread [ tid ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Default

Kernel thread starvation detection, if enabled, monitors all kernel threads.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

tid: Specifies a kernel thread by its ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647. If no kernel thread is specified for the undo command, the default is restored.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the master device is specified.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

You can disable kernel thread starvation detection for up to 128 kernel threads by executing the command.

Inappropriate use of the command can cause service problems or system breakdown. Make sure you understand the impact of the command on your network before you use it.

Examples

# Disable kernel thread starvation detection for kernel thread 15.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread 15

Related commands

·     display kernel starvation

·     display kernel starvation configuration

·     monitor kernel starvation time

·     monitor kernel starvation enable

monitor kernel starvation time

Use monitor kernel starvation time to set the interval for identifying a kernel thread starvation.

Use undo monitor kernel starvation time to restore the default.

Syntax

monitor kernel starvation time interval [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

undo monitor kernel starvation time [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Default

The interval for identifying a kernel thread starvation is 120 seconds.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

time interval: Specifies the interval for identifying a kernel thread starvation, in the range of 1 to 65535 seconds.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the master device is specified.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

If a thread is not executed within the specified interval, the system considers that a starvation has occurred, and outputs a starvation message.

Inappropriate use of the command can cause service problems or system breakdown. Make sure you understand the impact of the command on your network before you use it.

Examples

# Set the interval for identifying a kernel thread starvation to 120 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] monitor kernel starvation time 120

Related commands

·     display kernel starvation

·     display kernel starvation configuration

·     monitor kernel starvation enable

·     monitor kernel starvation exclude-thread

monitor process

Use monitor process to display process statistics.

Syntax

monitor process [ dumbtty ] [ iteration number ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dumbtty: Specifies dumbtty mode. In this mode, the command displays process statistics in descending order of CPU usage without refreshing statistics. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays statistics for the top 10 processes in descending order of CPU usage in an interactive mode, and refreshes statistics every 5 seconds by default.

iteration number: Specifies the number of display times, in the range of 1 to 4294967295. If you specify the dumbtty keyword, the number argument is 1 by default. If neither the dumbtty keyword nor the number argument is specified, there is no limit to the display times and process statistics are refreshed every 5 seconds.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify the dumbtty keyword, the command displays process statistics in an interactive mode. In this mode, the system automatically determines the number of displayed processes according to the screen size, and does not display exceeding processes. You can also input interactive commands as shown in Table 12 to perform relevant operations.

Table 12 Interactive commands

Commands

Description

? or h

Displays help information that includes available interactive commands.

1

Displays state information for physical CPUs. For example, if you enter 1 for the first time, the state of each physical CPU is displayed in a separate row. If you enter 1 again, the average value of all CPU states is displayed. If you enter 1 for the third time, separate states are displayed.

By default, the average value of all CPU states is displayed.

c

Sorts processes by CPU usage in descending order, which is the default setting.

d

Sets the interval for refreshing process statistics, in the range of 1 to 2147483647 seconds. The default value is 5 seconds.

f

Sorts processes by the number of open files in descending order. Files are identified by file descriptors (FDs).

k

Kills a process. Because the command can impact system operation, be cautious to use it.

l

Refreshes the screen.

m

Sorts processes by memory usage in descending order.

n

Changes the maximum number of processes displayed within a screen, in the range of 0 to 2147483647. The default value is 10. A value of 0 means no limit. Only processes not exceeding the screen size can be displayed.

q

Quits the interactive mode.

t

Sorts processes by running time in descending order.

Moves sort field to the next left column.

Moves sort field to the next right column.

 

Examples

# Display process statistics in dumbtty mode. In this mode, the system displays process statistics once, and then returns to command view.

<Sysname> monitor process dumbtty

 76 processes; 103 threads; 687 fds

Thread states: 1 running, 102 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 77.16% idle, 0.00% user, 14.96% kernel, 7.87% interrupt

Memory: 496M total, 341M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

   1047   1047  120    R     9   1420K  00:02:23  13.53%  diagd

      1      1  120    S    17   1092K  00:00:20   7.61%  scmd

   1000   1000  115    S     0      0K  00:00:09   0.84%  [sock/1]

   1026   1026  120    S    20  26044K  00:00:05   0.84%  syslogd

      2      2  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [kthreadd]

      3      3   99    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [migration/0]

      4      4  115    S     0      0K  00:00:06   0.00%  [ksoftirqd/0]

      5      5   99    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [watchdog/0]

      6      6  115    S     0      0K  00:00:01   0.00%  [events/0]

      7      7  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [khelper]

   4797   4797  120    S     8  28832K  00:00:02   0.00%  comsh

   5117   5117  120    S     8   1496K  00:00:00   0.00%  top

 

<Sysname>

# Display process statistics twice in dumbtty mode.

<Sysname> monitor process dumbtty iteration 2

76 processes; 103 threads; 687 fds

Thread states: 1 running, 102 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 44.84% idle, 0.51% user, 39.17% kernel, 15.46% interrupt

Memory: 496M total, 341M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

   1047   1047  120    R     9   1420K  00:02:30  37.11%  diagd

      1      1  120    S    17   1092K  00:00:21  11.34%  scmd

   1000   1000  115    S     0      0K  00:00:09   2.06%  [sock/1]

   1026   1026  120    S    20  26044K  00:00:05   1.54%  syslogd

   1027   1027  120    S    12   9280K  00:01:12   1.03%  devd

      4      4  115    S     0      0K  00:00:06   0.51%  [ksoftirqd/0]

   1009   1009  115    S     0      0K  00:00:08   0.51%  [karp/1]

   1010   1010  115    S     0      0K  00:00:13   0.51%  [kND/1]

   5373   5373  120    S     8   1496K  00:00:00   0.51%  top

      2      2  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [kthreadd]

      3      3   99    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [migration/0]

      5      5   99    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [watchdog/0]

      6      6  115    S     0      0K  00:00:01   0.00%  [events/0]

      7      7  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [khelper]

   4796   4796  120    S    11   2744K  00:00:00   0.00%  login

   4797   4797  120    S     8  28832K  00:00:03   0.00%  comsh

Five seconds later, the system refreshes process statistics as follows (which is the same as executing the monitor process dumbtty command twice at a 5-second interval):

76 processes; 103 threads; 687 fds

Thread states: 1 running, 102 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 78.71% idle, 0.16% user, 14.86% kernel, 6.25% interrupt

Memory: 496M total, 341M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

   1047   1047  120    R     9   1420K  00:02:31  14.25%  diagd

      1      1  120    S    17   1092K  00:00:21   4.25%  scmd

   1027   1027  120    S    12   9280K  00:01:12   1.29%  devd

   1000   1000  115    S     0      0K  00:00:09   0.37%  [sock/1]

   5373   5373  120    S     8   1500K  00:00:00   0.37%  top

      6      6  115    S     0      0K  00:00:01   0.18%  [events/0]

   1009   1009  115    S     0      0K  00:00:08   0.18%  [karp/1]

   1010   1010  115    S     0      0K  00:00:13   0.18%  [kND/1]

   4795   4795  120    S    11   2372K  00:00:01   0.18%  telnetd

      2      2  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [kthreadd]

      3      3   99    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [migration/0]

      4      4  115    S     0      0K  00:00:06   0.00%  [ksoftirqd/0]

      5      5   99    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [watchdog/0]

      7      7  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [khelper]

   4796   4796  120    S    11   2744K  00:00:00   0.00%  login

   4797   4797  120    S     8  28832K  00:00:03   0.00%  comsh

 

<Sysname>

# Display process statistics in interactive mode.

<Sysname> monitor process

76 processes; 103 threads; 687 fds

Thread states: 1 running, 102 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 78.98% idle, 0.16% user, 14.57% kernel, 6.27% interrupt

Memory: 496M total, 341M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

   1047   1047  120    R     9   1420K  00:02:39  14.13%  diagd

      1      1  120    S    17   1092K  00:00:23   3.98%  scmd

   1027   1027  120    S    12   9280K  00:01:13   1.44%  devd

   1000   1000  115    S     0      0K  00:00:09   0.36%  [sock/1]

   1009   1009  115    S     0      0K  00:00:09   0.36%  [karp/1]

      4      4  115    S     0      0K  00:00:06   0.18%  [ksoftirqd/0]

   1010   1010  115    S     0      0K  00:00:13   0.18%  [kND/1]

   4795   4795  120    S    11   2372K  00:00:01   0.18%  telnetd

   5491   5491  120    S     8   1500K  00:00:00   0.18%  top

      2      2  115    S     0      0K  00:00:00   0.00%  [kthreadd]

The system refreshes process statistics every 5 seconds. You can enter interactive commands to perform operation as follows:

·     Enter h or a question mark (?) to display help information as follows:

Help for interactive commands:

      ?,h    Show the available interactive commands

        1    Toggle SMP view: '1' single/separate states

        c    Sort by the CPU field(default)

        d    Set the delay interval between screen updates

        f    Sort by number of open files

        k    Kill a job

        l    Refresh the screen

        m    Sort by memory used

        n    Set the maximum number of processes to display

        q    Quit the interactive display

        t    Sort by run time of processes since last restart

        <    Move sort field to the next left column

        >    Move sort field to the next right column

Press any key to continue

·     Enter d, and then enter a number to modify the refresh interval. If you enter 3, statistics are refreshed every 3 seconds.

Enter the delay interval between updates(1~2147483647): 3

·     Enter n, and then enter a number to modify the maximum number of displayed processes. If you enter 5, statistics for five processes are displayed.

Enter the max number of processes to display(0 means unlimited):5

87 processes; 113 threads; 735 fds

Thread states: 2 running, 111 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 86.57% idle, 0.83% user, 11.74% kernel, 0.83% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 414M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

    864    864  120    S    24  27020K  00:00:43   8.95%  syslogd

   1173   1173  120    R    24   2664K  00:00:01   2.37%  top

    866    866  120    S    18  10276K  00:00:09   0.69%  devd

      1      1  120    S    16   1968K  00:00:04   0.41%  scmd

    881    881  120    S     8   2420K  00:00:07   0.41%  diagd

·     Enter f to sort processes by FDs in descending order. (You can also enter command c, m, or t to sort processes.)

87 processes; 113 threads; 735 fds

Thread states: 1 running, 112 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 90.66% idle, 0.88% user, 5.77% kernel, 2.66% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 414M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

    862    862  120    S    61   5384K  00:00:01   0.00%  dbmd

    905    905  120    S    35   2464K  00:00:02   0.00%  ipbased

    863    863  120    S    31   1956K  00:00:00   0.00%  had

    884    884  120    S    31  30600K  00:00:00   0.00%  lsmd

    889    889  120    S    29  61592K  00:00:00   0.00%  routed

·     Enter k and then enter a JID to kill a process. If you enter 884, the process with the JID of 884 is killed.

Enter the JID to kill: 884

84 processes; 107 threads; 683 fds

Thread states: 1 running, 106 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 59.03% idle, 1.92% user, 37.88% kernel, 1.15% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 419M available, page size 4K

    JID    PID  PRI  State  FDs    MEM  HH:MM:SS    CPU   Name

    862    862  120    S    56   5384K  00:00:01   0.00%  dbmd

    905    905  120    S    35   2464K  00:00:02   0.00%  ipbased

    863    863  120    S    30   1956K  00:00:00   0.00%  had

    889    889  120    S    29  61592K  00:00:00   0.00%  routed

   1160   1160  120    S    28  23096K  00:00:01   0.19%  sshd

·     Enter q to quit interactive mode.

Table 13 Command output

Field

Description

84 processes; 107 threads; 683 fds

Numbers of processes, threads, and open files.

JID

Job ID of a process, which never changes.

PID

ID of a process.

PRI

Priority level of a process.

State

State of a process:

·     R—Running.

·     SSleeping.

·     T—Traced or stopped.

·     D—Uninterruptible sleep.

·     Z—Zombie.

FDs

Number of open files for a process.

MEM

Memory usage. It displays 0 for a kernel thread.

HH:MM:SS

Running time of a process since last restart.

CPU

CPU usage of a process.

Name

Name of a process. If square brackets ([ ]) exist in a process name, the process is a kernel thread.

 

monitor thread

Use monitor thread to display thread statistics.

Syntax

monitor thread [ dumbtty ] [ iteration number ] [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

dumbtty: Specifies dumbtty mode. In this mode, the command displays all thread statistics in descending order of CPU usage without refreshing statistics. If you do not specify the keyword, the command displays statistics for top 10 processes in descending order of CPU usage in an interactive mode, and refreshes statistics every 5 seconds by default.

iteration number: Specifies the number of display times, in the range of 1 to 4294967295. If you specify the dumbtty keyword, the number argument is 1 by default. If neither the dumbtty keyword nor the number argument is specified, there is no limit to the display times.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify the dumbtty keyword, the command displays thread statistics in an interactive mode. In this mode, the system automatically determines the number of displayed thread processes according to the screen size and does not display exceeding processes. You can also input interactive commands as shown in Table 14 to perform relevant operations.

Table 14 Interactive commands

Commands

Description

? or h

Displays help information that includes available interactive commands.

d

Sets the interval for refreshing statistics. The default interval is 5 seconds.

k

Kills a process. Because the command can impact system operation, be cautious when you use it.

l

Refreshes the screen.

n

Changes the maximum number of threads displayed within a screen, in the range of 0 to 2147483647. The default value is 10. A value of 0 means no limit. Only threads not exceeding the screen size can be displayed.

q

Quits interactive mode.

Moves sort field to the next left column.

Moves sort field to the next right column.

 

Examples

# Display thread statistics in dumbtty mode.

<Sysname> monitor thread dumbtty

84 processes; 107 threads

Thread states: 1 running, 106 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 83.19% idle, 1.68% user, 10.08% kernel, 5.04% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 417M available, page size 4K

    JID    TID  LAST_CPU  PRI  State  HH:MM:SS   MAX    CPU    Name

   1175   1175      0     120    R    00:00:00     1  10.75%   top

      1      1      0     120    S    00:00:06     1   2.68%   scmd

    881    881      0     120    S    00:00:09     1   2.01%   diagd

    776    776      0     120    S    00:00:01     0   0.67%   [DEVD]

    866    866      0     120    S    00:00:11     1   0.67%   devd

      2      2      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [kthreadd]

      3      3      0     115    S    00:00:01     0   0.00%   [ksoftirqd/0]

      4      4      0      99    S    00:00:00     1   0.00%   [watchdog/0]

      5      5      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [events/0]

      6      6      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [khelper]

    796    796      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [kip6fs/1]

 

<Sysname>

# Display thread statistics in interactive mode.

<Sysname> monitor thread

84 processes; 107 threads

Thread states: 1 running, 106 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 94.43% idle, 0.76% user, 3.64% kernel, 1.15% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 417M available, page size 4K

    JID    TID  LAST_CPU  PRI  State  HH:MM:SS   MAX    CPU    Name

   1176   1176      0     120    R    00:00:01     1   3.42%   top

    866    866      0     120    S    00:00:12     1   0.85%   devd

    881    881      0     120    S    00:00:09     1   0.64%   diagd

      1      1      0     120    S    00:00:06     1   0.42%   scmd

   1160   1160      0     120    S    00:00:01     1   0.21%   sshd

      2      2      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [kthreadd]

      3      3      0     115    S    00:00:01     0   0.00%   [ksoftirqd/0]

      4      4      0      99    S    00:00:00     1   0.00%   [watchdog/0]

      5      5      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [events/0]

      6      6      0     115    S    00:00:00     0   0.00%   [khelper]

·     Enter h or a question mark (?) to display help information as follows:

Help for interactive commands:

        ?,h      Show the available interactive commands

          c      Sort by the CPU field(default)

          d      Set the delay interval between screen updates

          k      Kill a job

          l      Refresh the screen

          n      Set the maximum number of threads to display

          q      Quit the interactive display

          t      Sort by run time of threads since last restart

          <      Move sort field to the next left column

          >      Move sort field to the next right column

Press any key to continue

·     Enter d, and then enter a number to modify the refresh interval. If you enter 3, statistics are refreshed every 3 seconds.

Enter the delay interval between screen updates (1~2147483647): 3

·     Enter n, and then enter a number to modify the maximum number of displayed threads. If you enter 5, statistics for five threads are displayed.

Enter the max number of threads to display(0 means unlimited): 5

84 processes; 107 threads

Thread states: 1 running, 106 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 93.26% idle, 0.99% user, 4.23% kernel, 1.49% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 417M available, page size 4K

    JID    TID  LAST_CPU  PRI  State  HH:MM:SS   MAX    CPU    Name

   1176   1176      0     120    R    00:00:02     1   3.71%   top

      1      1      0     120    S    00:00:06     1   0.92%   scmd

    866    866      0     120    S    00:00:13     1   0.69%   devd

    881    881      0     120    S    00:00:10     1   0.69%   diagd

    720    720      0     115    D    00:00:01     0   0.23%   [TMTH]

·     Enter k and then enter a JID to kill a thread. If you enter 881, the thread with the JID of 881 is killed.

Enter the JID to kill: 881

83 processes; 106 threads

Thread states: 1 running, 105 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie

CPU states: 96.26% idle, 0.54% user, 2.63% kernel, 0.54% interrupt

Memory: 755M total, 418M available, page size 4K

    JID    TID  LAST_CPU  PRI  State  HH:MM:SS   MAX    CPU    Name

   1176   1176      0     120    R    00:00:04     1   1.86%   top

    866    866      0     120    S    00:00:14     1   0.87%   devd

      1      1      0     120    S    00:00:07     1   0.49%   scmd

    730    730      0       0    S    00:00:04     1   0.12%   [DIBC]

    762    762      0     120    S    00:00:22     1   0.12%   [MNET]

·     Enter q to quit interactive mode.

Table 15 Command output

Field

Description

84 processes; 107 threads

Numbers of processes and threads.

JID

Job ID of a thread, which never changes.

TID

ID of a thread.

LAST_CPU

Number of the CPU on which the latest thread scheduling occurs.

PRI

Priority level of a thread.

State

State of a thread:

·     R—Running.

·     S—Sleeping.

·     TTraced or stopped.

·     DUninterruptible sleep.

·     ZZombie.

HH:MM:SS

Running time of a thread since last restart.

MAX

Longest time that a single thread scheduling occupies the CPU, in milliseconds.

CPU

CPU usage of a thread.

Name

Name of a thread. If square brackets ([ ]) exist in a thread name, the thread is a kernel thread.

 

process core

Use process core to enable or disable a process to generate core files for exceptions and set the maximum number of core files.

Syntax

process core { maxcore value | off } { job job-id | name process-name } [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

User view

Default

A process generates a core file for the first exception and does not generate any core files for subsequent exceptions.

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

off: Disables core file generation.

maxcore value: Enables core file generation and sets the maximum number of core files, in the range of 1 to 10.

name process-name: Specifies a process by its name, a case-insensitive string of 1 to 15 characters.

job job-id: Specifies a process by its job ID, in the range of 1 to 2147483647. The job ID does not change after the process restarts.

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify a member device, this command displays information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Usage guidelines

The command applies to all instances of a process.

The command enables the system to generate a core file each time the specified process crashes until the maximum number of core files is reached. A core file records the exception information.

Because the core files consume system storage resources, you can disable core file generation for processes for which you do not need to review exception information.

Examples

# Disable core file generation for process routed.

<Sysname> process core off name routed

# Enable core file generation for process routed and set the maximum number of core files to 5.

<Sysname> process core maxcore 5 name routed

Related commands

·     display exception context

·     exception filepath

reset exception context

Use reset exception context to clear context information for process exceptions.

Syntax

reset exception context [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command clears context information for process exceptions on the master device.  

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Clear context information for exceptions.

<Sysname> reset exception context

Related commands

display exception context

reset kernel deadloop

Use reset kernel deadloop to clear kernel thread deadloop information.

Syntax

reset kernel deadloop [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command clears kernel thread deadloop information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Clear kernel thread deadloop information.

<Sysname> reset kernel deadloop

Related commands

display kernel deadloop

reset kernel exception

Use reset kernel exception to clear kernel thread exception information.

Syntax

reset kernel exception [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command clears kernel thread exception information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Clear kernel thread exception information.

<Sysname> reset kernel exception

Related commands

display kernel exception

reset kernel reboot

Use reset kernel reboot to clear kernel thread reboot information.

Syntax

reset kernel reboot [ slot slot-number [ cpu cpu-number ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

Parameters

slot slot-number: Specifies an IRF member device by its ID. If you do not specify this option, the command clears kernel thread reboot information for the master device.

cpu cpu-number: Specifies a CPU by its number. The value can only be 0.

Examples

# Clear kernel thread reboot information.

<Sysname> reset kernel reboot

Related commands

display kernel reboot