01-Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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01-CLI configuration
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Using the CLI

At the command-line interface (CLI), you can enter text commands to configure, manage, and monitor the device.

You can use different methods to log in to the CLI, including through the console port, Telnet, and SSH. For more information about login methods, see "Login overview."

CLI views

Commands are grouped in different views by feature. To use a command, you must enter its view.

CLI views are hierarchically organized, as shown in Figure 1. Each view has a unique prompt, from which you can identify where you are and what you can do. For example, the prompt [Sysname-vlan100] shows that you are in VLAN 100 view and can configure attributes for that VLAN.

Figure 1 CLI views

 

You are placed in user view immediately after you log in to the CLI. The user view prompt is <Device-name>, where Device-name indicates the device name. The device name is Sysname by default. You can change it by using the sysname command.

In user view, you can perform the following tasks:

·           Perform basic operations including display, debug, file management, FTP, Telnet, clock setting, and reboot.

·           Enter system view. The system view prompt is [Device-name].

In system view, you can perform the following tasks:

·           Configure global settings and some features, such as the daylight saving time, banners, and hotkeys.

·           Enter different feature views.

For example, you can perform the following tasks:

¡  Enter interface view to configure interface parameters.

¡  Enter VLAN view to add ports to the VLAN.

¡  Enter user line view to configure login user attributes.

A feature view might have child views. For example, NQA operation view has the child view HTTP operation view.

To display all commands available in a view, enter a question mark (?) at the view prompt.

Entering system view from user view

Task

Command

Enter system view.

system-view

 

Returning to the upper-level view from any view

Task

Command

Return to the upper-level view from any view.

quit

 

Executing the quit command in user view terminates your connection to the device.

In public key view, use the peer-public-key end command to return to system view.

Returning to user view

To return directly to user view from any other view, use the return command or press Ctrl+Z.

 

Task

Command

Return directly to user view.

return

Accessing the CLI online help

The CLI online help is context sensitive. Enter a question mark at any prompt or in any position of a command to display all available options.

To access the CLI online help, use one of the following methods:

·           Enter a question mark at a view prompt to display the first keyword of every command available in the view. For example:

<Sysname> ?

User view commands:                                                            

  archive             Archive configuration                                    

  arp                 Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) module                 

  backup              Backup operation                                         

  bash                Enter the bash shell                                     

  boot-loader         Software image file management                           

  bootrom             Update/read/backup/restore bootrom                       

  cd                  Change current directory                                 

  cfd                 Connectivity Fault Detection (CFD) module                

  clock               Specify the system clock                                 

  connectto           connect to target                                        

  copy                Copy a file                                              

  debugging           Enable system debugging functions                        

  delete              Delete a file                                            

  diagnostic          Generic OnLine Diagnostics (GOLD) module                 

  diagnostic-logfile  Diagnostic log file configuration                        

  dir                 Display files and directories on the storage media       

  display             Display current system information                       

  erase               Alias for 'delete'                                        

  exception           Exception information configuration                      

  exit                Alias for 'quit'                                         

  fdisk               Partition a storage medium                                

  fixdisk             Check and repair a storage medium                        

  format              Format a storage medium                                  

---- More ----

·           Enter a space and a question mark after a command keyword to display all available keywords and arguments.

¡  If the question mark is in the place of a keyword, the CLI displays all possible keywords, each with a brief description. For example:

<Sysname> terminal ?

  debugging  Enable to display debugging logs on the current terminal          

  logging    Display logs on the current terminal                              

  monitor    Enable to display logs on the current terminal                    

  tracing    Display traces on the current terminal

¡  If the question mark is in the place of an argument, the CLI displays the description for the argument. For example:

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface ?

  <1-4094>  Vlan-interface interface number

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 1 ?

  <cr>

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 1

<1-4094> is the value range for the argument. <cr> indicates that the command is complete and you can press Enter to execute the command.

·           Enter an incomplete keyword string followed by a question mark to display all keywords starting with that string. The CLI also displays the descriptions for the keywords. For example:

<Sysname> f?

  fdisk    Partition a storage medium                                           

  fixdisk  Check and repair a storage medium                                   

  format   Format a storage medium                                             

  free     Release a connection                                                 

  ftp      Open an FTP connection

<Sysname> display ftp?

  ftp         FTP module

  ftp-server  FTP server information

  ftp-user    FTP user information

Using the undo form of a command

Most configuration commands have an undo form for the following tasks:

·           Canceling a configuration.

·           Restoring the default.

·           Disabling a feature.

For example, the info-center enable command enables the information center. The undo info-center enable command disables the information center.

Entering a command

When you enter a command, you can perform the following tasks:

·           Use keys or hotkeys to edit the command line.

·           Use abbreviated keywords or keyword aliases.

Editing a command line

To edit a command line, use the keys listed in Table 1 or the hotkeys listed in Table 4. When you are finished, you can press Enter to execute the command.

The command edit buffer can contain a maximum of 511 characters. If the total length of a command line exceeds the limit after you press Tab to complete the last keyword or argument, the system does not complete the keyword or argument.

Table 1 Command line editing keys

Keys

Function

Common keys

If the edit buffer is not full, pressing a common key inserts a character at the cursor and moves the cursor to the right. The edit buffer can store up to 511 characters. Unless the buffer is full, all common characters that you enter before pressing Enter are saved in the edit buffer.

Backspace

Deletes the character to the left of the cursor and moves the cursor back one character.

Left arrow key ()

Moves the cursor one character to the left.

Right arrow key ()

Moves the cursor one character to the right.

Up arrow key ()

Displays the previous command in the command history buffer.

Down arrow key ()

Displays the next command in the command history buffer.

Tab

If you press Tab after typing part of a keyword, the system automatically completes the keyword.

·          If a unique match is found, the system displays the complete keyword.

·          If there is more than one match, press Tab multiple times to pick the keyword you want to enter.

·          If there is no match, the system does not modify what you entered but displays it again in the next line.

 

The device supports the following special commands:

·           #–Used by the system in a configuration file as separators for adjacent sections.

·           version–Used by the system in a configuration file to indicate the software version information. For example, version 7.1. xxx, Release xxx.

These commands are special because of the following reasons:

·           These commands are not intended for you to use at the CLI.

·           You can enter the # command in any view or the version command in system view, or enter any values for them. For example, you can enter # abc or version abc. However, the settings do not take effect.

·           The device does not provide any online help information for these commands.

Entering a text or string type value for an argument

A text type argument value can contain printable characters except the question mark (?).

A string type argument value can contain any printable characters except for question marks (?).

·           To include a quotation mark (") or backward slash (\) in a string type argument value, prefix the character with an escape key (\), for example, \" and \\.

·           To include a blank space in a string type argument value, enclose the value in quotation marks, for example, ''my device''.

A specific argument might have more requirements. For more information, see the relevant command reference.

To enter a printable character, you can enter the character or its ASCII code in the range of 32 to 126.

Entering an interface type

You can enter an interface type in one of the following formats:

·           Full spelling of the interface type.

·           An abbreviation that uniquely identifies the interface type.

·           Acronym of the interface type.

For a command line, all interface types are case insensitive. Table 2 shows the full spellings and acronyms of interface types.

For example, to use the interface command to enter the view of interface Ten-GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, you can enter the command line in the following formats:

·           interface ten-gigabitethernet 1/0/1

·           interface ten-g 1/0/1

·           interface ten-gig 1/0/1

The spaces between the interface types and interfaces are not required.

Table 2 Full spellings and acronyms of interface types

Full spelling

Acronym

Bridge-Aggregation

BAGG

EVI-Link

EVI

FortyGigE

FGE

GigabitEthernet

GE

HundredGigE

HGE

InLoopBack

InLoop

LoopBack

Loop

M-GigabitEthernet

MGE

MP-group

MP

NULL

NULL

Route-Aggregation

RAGG

Ten-GigabitEthernet

XGE

Tunnel

Tun

VE-L2VPN

L2VE

Virtual-Template

VT

Vlan-interface

Vlan-int

Vsi-interface

Vsi

 

Abbreviating commands

You can enter a command line quickly by entering incomplete keywords that uniquely identify the complete command. In user view, for example, commands starting with an s include startup saved-configuration and system-view. To enter the command system-view, you need to type only sy. To enter the command startup saved-configuration, type st s.

You can also press Tab to complete an incomplete keyword.

Configuring and using command aliases

You can configure one or more aliases for a command or the starting keywords of commands. Then, you can use the aliases to execute the command or commands. If the command or commands have undo forms, you can also use the aliases to execute the undo command or commands.

For example, if you configure the alias shiprt for display ip routing-table, you can enter shiprt to execute the display ip routing-table command. If you configure the alias ship for display ip, you can use ship to execute all commands starting with display ip:

·           Enter ship routing-table to execute the display ip routing-table command.

·           Enter ship interface to execute the display ip interface command.

Usage guidelines

After you successfully execute a command by using an alias, the system saves the command, instead of the alias, to the running configuration.

The command string represented by an alias can include a maximum of nine parameters. Each parameter starts with the dollar sign ($) and a sequence number in the range of 1 to 9. For example, you can configure the alias shinc for the display $1 | include $2 command. Then, you can enter shinc hotkey CTRL_C to execute the display hotkey | include CTRL_C command.

To use an alias for a command that has parameters, you must specify a value for each parameter. If you fail to do so, the system informs you that the command is incomplete and displays the command string represented by the alias.

The device has a set of system-defined command aliases, as listed in Table 3. System-defined command aliases cannot be deleted.

Table 3 System-defined command aliases

Command alias

Command or command keyword

access-list

acl

end

return

erase

delete

exit

quit

hostname

sysname

logging

info-center

no

undo

show

display

write

save

 

Configuration procedure

To configure a command alias:

 

Step

Command

Remarks

1.      Enter system view.

system-view

N/A

2.      Configure a command alias.

alias alias command

By default, the device has a set of command aliases, as listed in Table 3.

3.      (Optional.) Display command aliases.

display alias [ alias ]

This command is available in any view.

 

Configuring and using command hotkeys

About hotkeys

The system supports the hotkeys shown in Table 4. Pressing a hotkey executes the command or function assigned to the hotkey. You can configure all the hotkeys except Ctrl+].

If a hotkey is also defined by the terminal software you are using to interact with the device, you can reconfigure the hotkey or remove the hotkey.

Restrictions and guidelines

A hotkey can correspond to only one command or function. If you assign multiple commands or functions to the same hotkey, the most recently assigned command or function takes effect.

A command or function can be assigned to multiple hotkeys. You can use any of the hotkeys to execute the command or function.

If a hotkey is also defined by the terminal software you are using to interact with the device, the terminal software definition takes effect.

Procedure

To configure a command hotkey:

 

Step

Command

Remarks

1.      Enter system view.

system-view

N/A

2.      Configure a hotkey.

hotkey hotkey { command | function function | none }

Table 4 shows the default definitions for the hotkeys.

3.      (Optional.) Display hotkeys.

display hotkey

This command is available in any view.

 

Table 4 System-reserved hotkeys

Hotkey

Function or command

Ctrl+A

move_the_cursor_to_the_beginning_of_the_line: Moves the cursor to the beginning of a line.

Ctrl+B

move_the_cursor_one_character_to_the_left: Moves the cursor one character to the left.

Ctrl+C

stop_the_current_command: Stops the current command.

Ctrl+D

erase_the_character_at_the_cursor: Deletes the character at the cursor.

Ctrl+E

move_the_cursor_to_the_end_of_the_line: Moves the cursor to the end of a line.

Ctrl+F

move_the_cursor_one_character_to_the_right: Moves the cursor one character to the right.

Ctrl+G

display current-configuration: Displays the running configuration.

Ctrl+H

erase_the_character_to_the_left_of_the_cursor: Deletes the character to the left of the cursor.

Ctrl+L

display ip routing-table: Displays routing table information.

Ctrl+N

display_the_next_command_in_the_history_buffer: Displays the next command in the history buffer.

Ctrl+O

undo debugging all: Disables debugging for all features and functions.

Ctrl+P

display_the_previous_command_in_the_history_buffer: Displays the previous command in the history buffer.

Ctrl+R

redisplay_the_current_line: Redisplays the current line.

Ctrl+T

N/A

Ctrl+U

N/A

Ctrl+W

delete_the_word_to_the_left_of_the_cursor: Deletes the word to the left of the cursor.

Ctrl+X

delete_all_characters_from_the_beginning_of_the_line_to_the_cursor: Deletes all characters to the left of the cursor.

Ctrl+Y

delete_all_characters_from_the_cursor_to_the_end_of_the_line: Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of the line.

Ctrl+Z

return_to_the_User_View: Returns to user view.

Ctrl+]

kill_incoming_connection_or_redirect_connection: Terminates the current connection.

Esc+B

move_the_cursor_back_one_word: Moves the cursor back one word.

Esc+D

delete_all_characters_from_the_cursor_to_the_end_of_the_word: Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of the word.

Esc+F

move_the_cursor_forward_one_word: Moves the cursor forward one word.

 

Enabling redisplaying entered-but-not-submitted commands

Your input might be interrupted by system information output. If redisplaying entered-but-not-submitted commands is enabled, the system redisplays your input after finishing the output. You can then continue entering the command line.

To enable redisplaying entered-but-not-submitted commands:

 

Step

Command

Remarks

1.      Enter system view.

system-view

N/A

2.      Enable redisplaying entered-but-not-submitted commands.

info-center synchronous

By default, the system does not redisplay entered-but-not-submitted commands.

For more information about this command, see Network Management and Monitoring Command Reference.

 

Understanding command-line error messages

After you press Enter to submit a command, the command line interpreter examines the command syntax.

·           If the command passes syntax check, the CLI executes the command.

·           If the command fails syntax check, the CLI displays an error message.

Table 5 Common command-line error messages

Error message

Cause

% Unrecognized command found at '^' position.

The keyword in the marked position is invalid.

% Incomplete command found at '^' position.

One or more required keywords or arguments are missing.

% Ambiguous command found at '^' position.

The entered character sequence matches more than one command.

% Too many parameters found at '^' position.

The entered character sequence contains excessive keywords or arguments.

% Wrong parameter found at '^' position.

The argument in the marked position is invalid.

 

Using the command history feature

The system automatically saves commands successfully executed by a login user to the following two command history buffers:

·           Command history buffer for the user line.

·           Command history buffer for all user lines.

Table 6 Comparison between the two types of command history buffers

Item

Command history buffer for a user line

Command history buffer for all user lines

What kind of commands are saved in the buffer?

Commands successfully executed by the current user of the user line.

Commands successfully executed by all login users.

Cleared when the user logs out?

Yes.

No.

How to view buffered commands?

Use the display history-command command.

Use the display history-command all command.

How to recall a buffered command?

·          (Method 1.) Navigate to the command in the buffer and press Enter.

·          (Method 2.) Use the repeat command. For more information, see "Repeating commands in the command history buffer for a line."

You cannot recall buffered commands.

How to set the buffer size?

Use the history-command max-size size-value command in user line view to set the buffer size.

By default, the buffer can store up to 10 commands.

You cannot set the buffer size.

The buffer can store up to 1024 commands.

How to disable the buffer?

Setting the buffer size to 0 disables the buffer.

You cannot disable the buffer.

 

Command buffering rules

The system follows these rules when buffering commands:

·           If you use incomplete keywords when entering a command, the system buffers the command in the exact form that you used.

·           If you use an alias when entering a command, the system transforms the alias to the represented command or command keywords before buffering the command.

·           If you enter a command in the same format multiple times in succession, the system buffers the command only once. If you enter a command in different formats multiple times, the system buffers each command format. For example, display cu and display current-configuration are buffered as two entries but successive repetitions of display cu create only one entry.

·           To buffer a new command when a buffer is full, the system deletes the oldest command entry in the buffer.

Repeating commands in the command history buffer for a line

You can recall and execute commands in the command history buffer for the current user line multiple times.

To repeat commands in the command history buffer for the current user line:

 

Task

Command

Remarks

Repeat commands in the command history buffer for the current CLI session.

repeat [ number ] [ count times ] [ delay seconds ]

This command is available in any view. However, to repeat a command, you must first enter the view for the command. To repeat multiple commands, you must first enter the view for the first command.

This command executes commands in the order they were executed.

The system waits for your interaction when it repeats an interactive command.

 

Controlling the CLI output

This section describes the CLI output control features that help you identify the desired output.

Pausing between screens of output

By default, the system automatically pauses after displaying a maximum of 24 lines if the output is too long to fit on one screen. You can change the limit by using the screen-length screen-length command. For more information about this command, see Fundamentals Command Reference.

At a pause, the system displays ----more----. You can use the keys described in "Output controlling keys" to display more information or stop the display.

You can also disable pausing between screens of output for the current session. Then, all output is displayed at one time and the screen is refreshed continuously until the final screen is displayed.

Output controlling keys

Keys

Function

Space

Displays the next screen.

Enter

Displays the next line.

Ctrl+C

Stops the display and cancels the command execution.

<PageUp>

Displays the previous page.

<PageDown>

Displays the next page.

 

Disabling pausing between screens of output

To disable pausing between screens of output, execute the following command in user view:

 

Task

Command

Remarks

Disable pausing between screens of output for the current CLI session.

screen-length disable

By default, a CLI session uses the screen-length screen-length command settings in user line view.

This command is a one-time command and takes effect only for the current CLI session.

 

Numbering each output line from a display command

You can use the | by-linenum option to prefix each display command output line with a number for easy identification.

Each line number is displayed as a 5-character string and might be followed by a colon (:) or hyphen (-). If you specify both | by-linenum and | begin regular-expression for a display command, a hyphen is displayed for all lines that do not match the regular expression.

To number each output line from a display command:

 

Task

Command

Number each output line from a display command.

display command | by-linenum

 

For example:

# Display information about VLAN 999, numbering each output line.

<Sysname> display vlan 999 | by-linenum

    1:  VLAN ID: 999

    2:  VLAN type: Static

    3:  Route interface: Configured

    4:  IPv4 address: 192.168.2.1

    5:  IPv4 subnet mask: 255.255.255.0

    6:  Description: For LAN Access

    7:  Name: VLAN 0999

    8:  Tagged ports:   None

    9:  Untagged ports: None

Filtering the output from a display command

You can use the [ | [ by-linenum ] { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ]&<1-128> option to filter the display command output.

·           You can use the option to specify a maximum of 128 filter conditions. The system displays only output lines that meet all the conditions.

·           by-linenum—Displays a number before each output line. You need to specify this keyword in only one filter condition.

·           begin—Displays the first line matching the specified regular expression and all subsequent lines.

·           exclude—Displays all lines not matching the specified regular expression.

·           include—Displays all lines matching the specified regular expression.

·           regular-expression—A case-sensitive string of 1 to 256 characters, which can contain the special characters described in Table 7.

The required filtering time increases with the complexity of the regular expression. To abort the filtering process, press Ctrl+C.

Table 7 Special characters supported in a regular expression

Characters

Meaning

Examples

^

Matches the beginning of a line.

"^u" matches all lines beginning with "u". A line beginning with "Au" is not matched.

$

Matches the end of a line.

"u$" matches all lines ending with "u". A line ending with "uA" is not matched.

. (period)

Matches any single character.

".s" matches "as" and "bs".

*

Matches the preceding character or string zero, one, or multiple times.

"zo*" matches "z" and "zoo", and "(zo)*" matches "zo" and "zozo".

+

Matches the preceding character or string one or multiple times.

"zo+" matches "zo" and "zoo", but not "z".

|

Matches the preceding or succeeding string.

"def|int" matches a line containing "def" or "int".

( )

Matches the string in the parentheses, usually used together with the plus sign (+) or asterisk sign (*).

"(123A)" matches "123A".

"408(12)+" matches "40812" and "408121212", but not "408".

\N

Matches the preceding strings in parentheses, with the Nth string repeated once.

"(string)\1" matches a string containing "stringstring".

"(string1)(string2)\2" matches a string containing "string1string2string2".

"(string1)(string2)\1\2" matches a string containing " string1string2string1string2".

[ ]

Matches a single character in the brackets.

"[16A]" matches a string containing 1, 6, or A; "[1-36A]" matches a string containing 1, 2, 3, 6, or A (- is a hyphen).

To match the character "]", put it immediately after "[", for example, []abc]. There is no such limit on "[".

[^]

Matches a single character that is not in the brackets.

"[^16A]" matches a string that contains one or more characters except for 1, 6, or A, such as "abc". A match can also contain 1, 6, or A (such as "m16"), but it cannot contain these three characters only (such as 1, 16, or 16A).

{n}

Matches the preceding character n times. The number n must be a nonnegative integer.

"o{2}" matches "food", but not "Bob".

{n,}

Matches the preceding character n times or more. The number n must be a nonnegative integer.

"o{2,}" matches "foooood", but not "Bob".

{n,m}

Matches the preceding character n to m times or more. The numbers n and m must be nonnegative integers and n cannot be greater than m.

" o{1,3}" matches "fod", "food", and "foooood", but not "fd".

\<

Matches a string that starts with the pattern following \<. A string that contains the pattern is also a match if the characters preceding the pattern are not digits, letters, or underscores.

"\<do" matches "domain" and "doa".

\>

Matches a string that ends with the pattern preceding \>. A string that contains the pattern is also a match if the characters following the pattern are not digits, letters, or underscores.

"do\>" matches "undo" and "cdo".

\b

Matches a word that starts with the pattern following \b or ends with the pattern preceding \b.

"er\b" matches "never", but not "verb" or "erase".

"\ber" matches "erase", but not "verb" or "never".

\B

Matches a word that contains the pattern but does not start or end with the pattern.

"er\B" matches "verb", but not "never" or "erase".

\w

Same as [A-Za-z0-9_], matches a digit, letter, or underscore.

"v\w" matches "vlan" and "service".

\W

Same as [^A-Za-z0-9_], matches a character that is not a digit, letter, or underscore.

"\Wa" matches "-a", but not "2a" or "ba".

\

Escape character. If a special character listed in this table follows \, the specific meaning of the character is removed.

"\\" matches a string containing "\", "\^" matches a string containing "^", and "\\b" matches a string containing "\b".

 

For example:

# Display the running configuration, starting from the first configuration line that contains line.

<Sysname> display current-configuration | begin line

line class aux                                                                 

 user-role network-admin                                                       

#                                                                              

line class vty                                                                 

 user-role network-operator                                                    

#                                                                              

line aux 0                                                                      

 user-role network-admin                                                       

#                                                                              

line vty 0 63                                                                   

 authentication-mode none                                                      

 user-role network-admin                                                       

 user-role network-operator                                                    

#

...

# Display brief information about interfaces in up state.

<Sysname> display interface brief | exclude DOWN

Brief information on interfaces in route mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Protocol: (s) - spoofing

Interface            Link Protocol Primary IP      Description

InLoop0              UP   UP(s)    --

NULL0                UP   UP(s)    --

Vlan1                UP   UP       192.168.1.83

 

Brief information on interfaces in bridge mode:

Link: ADM - administratively down; Stby - standby

Speed: (a) - auto

Duplex: (a)/A - auto; H - half; F - full

Type: A - access; T - trunk; H - hybrid

Interface            Link Speed    Duplex Type PVID Description

GE1/0/1              UP   1000M(a) F(a)   A    1

# Display SNMP-related running configuration lines.

<Sysname> display current-configuration | include snmp

snmp-agent

 snmp-agent community write private

 snmp-agent community read public

 snmp-agent sys-info version all

 snmp-agent target-host trap address udp-domain 192.168.1.26 params securityname public

# Display log entries in the log buffer that contain both SHELL and VTY.

<Sysname> display logbuffer | include SEHLL | include VTY

%Sep  6 10:38:12:320 2018 Sysname SHELL/5/SHELL_LOGIN: VTY logged in from 169.254.100.171.

%Sep  6 10:52:32:576 2018 Sysname SHELL/5/SHELL_LOGOUT: VTY logged out from 169.254.100.171.

%Sep  6 16:03:27:100 2018 Sysname SHELL/5/SHELL_LOGIN: VTY logged in from 169.254.100.171.

%Sep  6 16:44:18:113 2018 Sysname SHELL/5/SHELL_LOGOUT: VTY logged out from 169.254.100.171.

Saving the output from a display command to a file

A display command shows certain configuration and operation information of the device. Its output might vary over time or with user configuration or operation. You can save the output to a file for future retrieval or troubleshooting.

Use one of the following methods to save the output from a display command:

·           Save the output to a separate file. Use this method if you want to use one file for a single display command.

·           Append the output to the end of a file. Use this method if you want to use one file for multiple display commands.

To save the output from a display command to a file, use one of the following commands in any view:

 

Task

Command

Save the output from a display command to a separate file.

display command > filename

Append the output from a display command to the end of a file.

display command >> filename

 

For example:

# Save the VLAN 1 settings to a separate file named vlan.txt.

<Sysname> display vlan 1 > vlan.txt

# Verify that the VLAN 1 settings are saved to the file vlan.txt.

<Sysname> more vlan.txt

VLAN ID: 1

 VLAN type: Static

 Route interface: Not configured

 Description: VLAN 0001

 Name: VLAN 0001

 Tagged ports:   None

 Untagged ports: None

# Append the VLAN 999 settings to the end of the file vlan.txt.

<Sysname> display vlan 999 >> vlan.txt

# Verify that the VLAN 999 settings are appended to the end of the file vlan.txt.

<Sysname> more vlan.txt

VLAN ID: 1

 VLAN type: Static

 Route interface: Not configured

 Description: VLAN 0001

 Name: VLAN 0001

 Tagged ports:   None

 Untagged ports: None

 

 VLAN ID: 999

 VLAN type: Static

 Route interface: Configured

 IP address: 192.168.2.1

 Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0

 Description: For LAN Access

 Name: VLAN 0999

 Tagged ports:   None

 Untagged ports: None

Viewing and managing the output from a display command effectively

You can use the following methods in combination to filter and manage the output from a display command:

·           Numbering each output line from a display command

·           Filtering the output from a display command

·           Saving the output from a display command to a file

To use multiple measures to view and manage the output from a display command effectively, execute the following command in any view:

 

Task

Command

View and manage the output from a display command effectively.

display command [ | [ by-linenum ] { begin | exclude | include } regular-expression ]&<1-128> [ > filename | >> filename ]

 

For example:

# Save the running configuration to a separate file named test.txt, with each line numbered.

<Sysname> display current-configuration | by-linenum > test.txt

# Append lines including snmp in the running configuration to the file test.txt.

<Sysname> display current-configuration | include snmp >> test.txt

# Display the first line that begins with user-group in the running configuration and all the following lines.

<Sysname> display current-configuration | by-linenum begin user-group

  114:  user-group system

  115-  #

  116-  return

// The colon (:) following a line number indicates that the line contains the string user-group. The hyphen (-) following a line number indicates that the line does not contain the string user-group.

Saving the running configuration

To make your configuration take effect after a reboot, save the running configuration to a configuration file by using the save command in any view. This command saves all commands that have been successfully executed, except for the one-time commands. Typical one-time commands include display commands used for displaying information and reset commands used for clearing information.

For more information about the save command, see Fundamentals Command Reference.