08-MPLS Command Reference

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06-RSVP commands
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06-RSVP commands 184.17 KB

RSVP commands

authentication challenge

Use authentication challenge to enable the RSVP challenge-response handshake feature globally or for an RSVP neighbor.

Use undo authentication challenge to disable the challenge-response handshake feature globally or for an RSVP neighbor.

Syntax

authentication challenge

undo authentication challenge

Default

The RSVP challenge-response handshake feature is disabled.

Views

RSVP view

RSVP neighbor view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

To prevent packet replay attacks, RSVP requires received authentication messages to carry incremental sequence numbers. To verify the subsequent messages, RSVP saves the sequence number of the last valid message in a receive-type security association.

However, when RSVP creates a new receive-type security association, it cannot obtain the sequence number of the sender. To successfully establish the receive-type security association, RSVP sets the receive sequence number to 0 by default. Then, the association can receive a message with any sequence number from the peer. Because this introduces a vulnerability to replay attacks, you should execute the authentication challenge command. When RSVP creates a receive-type security association, it will perform a challenge-response handshake to obtain the sequence number of the sender.

RSVP challenge-response handshake can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

The execution of this command affects only security associations established after the execution. To apply the setting to existing security associations, you must execute the reset rsvp authentication command to delete and then re-establish the security associations.

Examples

# Enable RSVP challenge-response handshake globally.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] authentication challenge

# Enable challenge-response handshake for RSVP neighbor 1.1.1.9.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] peer 1.1.1.9

[Sysname-rsvp-peer-1.1.1.9] authentication challenge

Related commands

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

authentication key

Use authentication key to enable RSVP authentication globally or for an RSVP neighbor, and configure the authentication key.

Use undo authentication key to disable RSVP authentication.

Syntax

authentication key { cipher | plain } string

undo authentication key

Default

RSVP authentication is disabled.

Views

RSVP view

RSVP neighbor view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

cipher: Specifies an authentication key in encrypted form.

plain: Specifies an authentication key in plaintext form. For security purposes, the key specified in plaintext form will be stored in encrypted form.

string: Specifies the authentication key. Its plaintext form is a case-sensitive string of 1 to 16 characters. Its encrypted form is a case-sensitive string of 1 to 53 characters.

Usage guidelines

RSVP authentication ensures integrity of RSVP messages, and prevents false resource reservation requests from occupying network resources.

With RSVP authentication, the sender uses the MD5 algorithm and the authentication key to calculate a message digest for an RSVP message. The sender inserts the message digest to the RSVP message. When the receiver receives the message, it performs the same calculation and compares the result with the message digest received. If the two digests match, the receiver accepts the message. If the two digests do not match, it drops the message.

RSVP authentication can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified RSVP neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

Configurations in RSVP neighbor view, interface view, and RSVP view are in descending order of priority. If RSVP authentication for a neighbor is enabled in both RSVP neighbor view and RSVP view with different authentication keys configured, the key configured in RSVP neighbor view is used.

To re-establish a security association, you must delete the authentication key used by the current security association or delete the current security association (using the reset rsvp authentication command). Then, the device can re-establish a security association by looking up a new authentication key in order of priorities.

After you enable RSVP authentication on the local device, you must also enable RSVP authentication and configure the same authentication key on the RSVP neighbor.

Examples

# Enable RSVP authentication globally, and configure the authentication key as a plaintext string of abcdefgh.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] authentication key plain abcdefgh

# Enable RSVP authentication for neighbor 1.1.1.9, and configure the authentication key as a plaintext string of abcdefgh.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] peer 1.1.1.9

[Sysname-rsvp-peer-1.1.1.9] authentication key plain abcdefgh

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

authentication lifetime

Use authentication lifetime in RSVP view to set the global idle timeout for RSVP security associations.

Use authentication lifetime in RSVP neighbor view to set the idle timeout for RSVP security associations with an RSVP neighbor.

Use undo authentication lifetime to restore the default.

Syntax

authentication lifetime life-time

undo authentication lifetime

Default

The idle timeout for an RSVP security association is 1800 seconds.

Views

RSVP view

RSVP neighbor view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

life-time: Specifies the RSVP security association idle timeout in the range of 30 to 86400 seconds.

Usage guidelines

When RSVP authentication is enabled, the device dynamically establishes security associations when receiving and sending RSVP messages.

To release memory resources, each security association has an idle timeout. When a security association is idle for the specified timeout time, the device deletes the security association. When the device sends or receives an authenticated RSVP message, it resets the idle timeout timer for the corresponding security association.

The RSVP authentication idle timeout can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified RSVP neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

An RSVP security association established by using the authentication key configured in a view uses the idle timeout configured in the same view.

A modification to the idle timeout affects only security associations established after the modification. To apply the new setting to existing security associations, you must execute the reset rsvp authentication command to delete and then re-establish the security associations.

Examples

# Set the global idle timeout to 100 seconds for RSVP security associations.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] authentication lifetime 100

# Set the idle timeout to 100 seconds for the security associations with RSVP neighbor 1.1.1.9.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] peer 1.1.1.9

[Sysname-rsvp-peer-1.1.1.9] authentication lifetime 100

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

authentication window-size

Use authentication window-size in RSVP view to set the global RSVP authentication window size, which is the maximum number of authenticated RSVP messages that can be received out of sequence.

Use authentication window-size in RSVP neighbor view to set the RSVP authentication window size for an RSVP neighbor.

Use undo authentication window-size to restore the default.

Syntax

authentication window-size number

undo authentication window-size

Default

Only one authenticated RSVP message can be received out of sequence.

Views

RSVP view

RSVP neighbor view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

number: Specifies the maximum number of authenticated RSVP messages that can be received out of sequence, in the range of 1 to 64.

Usage guidelines

To protect against replay attacks, the sender places a unique sequence number in each RSVP message that contains authentication information. The sender increases the value of the sequence number by one each time it sends an RSVP message. If the sequence number of a received message is in the specified authentication window size, the receiver accepts the message. If it is not in the specified authentication window size, the receiver discards the message.

When the receiver receives an RSVP message, it compares the sequence number of the last accepted RSVP message with the sequence number of the newly received RSVP message.

·     If the new sequence number is greater than the last sequence number, RSVP accepts the message and updates the last sequence number with the new sequence number.

·     If the new sequence number equals the last sequence number, RSVP regards the message a replay message and discards the message.

·     If the new sequence number is smaller than the last sequence number but greater than the last sequence number minus the window size, and has never been received before, RSVP accepts the message. If the new sequence number has been received before, RSVP regards the message a replay message and discards the message.

·     If the new sequence number is smaller than or equal to the last sequence number minus the window size, RSVP regards the message invalid and discards the message.

By default, the authentication window size is 1. If the sequence number of a newly received RSVP message is smaller than that of the last accepted message, the device discards the message. However, if the sender sends multiple RSVP messages in a short time, these messages might arrive at the neighbor out of sequence. If you use the default window size, the out-of-sequence messages will be discarded. To solve this problem, you can use the authentication window-size command to configure a correct window size.

A security association established by using the authentication key configured in a view uses the window size configured in that view.

A modification to the window size affects only security associations established after the modification. To apply the new setting to existing security associations, you must execute the reset rsvp authentication command to delete and then re-establish the security associations.

Examples

# In RSVP view, set the maximum number of out-of-sequence authenticated RSVP messages that can be received to 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] authentication window-size 10

# In RSVP neighbor view, set the maximum number of out-of-sequence authenticated RSVP messages that can be received from RSVP neighbor 1.1.1.9 to 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] peer 1.1.1.9

[Sysname-rsvp-peer-1.1.1.9] authentication window-size 10

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

display rsvp

Use display rsvp to display RSVP information.

Syntax

display rsvp [ interface [ interface-type interface-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

interface: Displays RSVP information on interfaces. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays global RSVP information.

interface-type interface-number: Displays RSVP information on the interface specified by its type and number. If you specify the interface keyword without this argument, the command displays RSVP information for all interfaces.

Examples

# Display global RSVP information.

<Sysname> display rsvp

LSR ID: 50.0.0.1                       Fast Reroute time: 300 sec

Refresh interval: 30 sec               Keep multiplier: 3

Hello interval: 3 sec                  Hello lost: 4

Graceful Restart: Disabled             DSCP value: 48

Authentication: Enabled

  Lifetime: 300 sec

  Window size: 64

  Challenge: Enabled

P2P statistics:

  PSB number: 5                        RSB number: 5

  LSP number: 5                        Request number: 5

  Peer number: 5                       SA number: 5

P2MP statistics:

  PSB number: 0                        RSB number: 0

  LSP number: 0                        Request number: 0

  Peer number: 0                       SA number: 0

Table 1 Command output

Field

Description

Fast Reroute time

Interval for detecting whether a better bypass CRLSP is available for a primary CRLSP, in seconds.

Refresh interval

Interval for refreshing Path and Resv messages, in seconds.

Keep multiplier

PSB and RSB timeout multiplier.

Hello interval

Interval for sending hello requests, in seconds.

Hello lost

Maximum number of consecutive lost or erroneous hellos allowed.

DSCP value

DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets.

Authentication

RSVP authentication state.

Lifetime

Idle timeout for RSVP security associations, in seconds.

Window size

Maximum number of out-of-sequence authenticated RSVP messages that can be received.

Challenge

State of the challenge-response handshake feature.

P2P statistics

RSVP P2P statistics.

PSB number

Total number of PSBs.

RSB number

Total number of RSBs.

LSP number

Total number of LSPs established by RSVP.

Request number

Total number of RSVP request data blocks.

Peer number

Total number of RSVP neighbors.

SA number

Total number of security associations.

P2MP statistics

This field is not supported in the current software version.

RSVP P2MP statistics.

 

# Display RSVP information for all interfaces.

<Sysname> display rsvp interface

Interface: Vlan10                      Logical interface handle: 0x19a5

State: Up                              IP address: 50.1.0.1

MPLS TE: Enabled                       RSVP: Enabled

Hello: Enabled                         BFD: Enabled

Summary refresh: Enabled               Reliability: Disabled

Retransmit interval: 500 ms            Retransmit increment: 1

Authentication: Enabled

  Lifetime: 300 sec

  Window size: 64

  Challenge: Enabled

Bypass tunnels: Tunnel0

 

Interface: Vlan20                      Logical interface handle: 0x19a6

State: Up                              IP address: 50.2.0.1

MPLS TE: Enabled                       RSVP: Enabled

Hello: Enabled                         BFD: Enabled

Summary refresh: Disabled              Reliability: Disabled

Retransmit interval: 500 ms            Retransmit increment: 1

Authentication: Enabled

  Lifetime: 300 sec

  Window size: 64

  Challenge: Enabled

Bypass tunnels: Tunnel0, Tunnel1, Tunnel2

Table 2 Command output

Field

Description

Logical interface handle

Logical interface handle, used to distinguish logical outgoing interfaces on the RSVP interface.

State

Interface state recorded by RSVP: UP or Down.

IP address

IP address of the current interface used by RSVP.

MPLS TE

MPLS TE state on the interface.

RSVP

RSVP state on the interface.

Hello

State of the hello extension feature on the interface.

BFD

BFD state on the interface.

Summary refresh

State of the summary refresh feature on the interface.

Reliability

State of the reliable RSVP message delivery feature on the interface.

Retransmit interval

Initial retransmission interval for reliable RSVP message delivery, in milliseconds.

Retransmit increment

Retransmission increment value for reliable RSVP message delivery.

Authentication

RSVP authentication state on the interface.

Lifetime

Idle timeout for RSVP security associations, in seconds.

Window size

Maximum number of out-of-sequence authenticated RSVP messages that can be received.

Challenge

State of the challenge-response handshake feature on the interface.

Bypass tunnels

Bypass tunnels configured on the interface for fast reroute (FRR). If no bypass tunnels are configured, this field displays None.

 

display rsvp authentication

Use display rsvp authentication to display information about the security associations established with RSVP neighbors.

Syntax

display rsvp authentication [ from ip-address ] [ to ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

from ip-address: Displays information about the security associations with the specified source IP address.

to ip-address: Displays information about the security associations with the specified destination IP address.

verbose: Displays detailed information about RSVP security associations. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information about RSVP security associations.

Usage guidelines

After RSVP authentication is enabled, the device automatically establishes security associations when sending and receiving RSVP messages. A security association includes the following information:

·     IP address of the authentication source node.

·     IP address of the authentication destination node.

·     Authentication direction.

·     Authentication type.

·     Authentication key.

·     Authentication expiration time.

The device obtains the RSVP authentication source and destination IP addresses from the IP header or RSVP message objects, as shown in Table 3.

Table 3 How to get RSVP authentication source and destination IP addresses

Message type received or sent

Authentication source IP

Authentication destination IP

Path

Address in the HOP object of the RSVP message.

Address in the SESSION object of the RSVP message.

PathTear

Address in the HOP object of the RSVP message.

Address in the SESSION object of the RSVP message.

PathError

Source IP address in the IP header

Destination IP address in the IP header

Resv

Address in the HOP object of the RSVP message.

Destination IP address in the IP header

ResvTear

Address in the HOP object of the RSVP message.

Destination IP address in the IP header

ResvError

Address in the HOP object of the RSVP message.

Destination IP address in the IP header

ResvConfirm

Source IP address in the IP header

Address in the CONFIRM object of the RSVP message.

ACK

Source IP address in the IP header

Destination IP address in the IP header

Srefresh

Source IP address in the IP header

Destination IP address in the IP header

Hello

Source IP address in the IP header

Destination IP address in the IP header

 

If you do not specify the from ip-address to ip-address options, this command displays information about the security associations established with all RSVP neighbors.

Examples

# Display brief information about the security associations established with all RSVP neighbors.

<Sysname> display rsvp authentication

From            To              Mode    Type      Key-ID       Expiration

57.10.10.1      57.10.10.2      Receive Interface 000103000000 280s

57.10.10.2      57.10.10.1      Send    Interface 000103000000 280s

Table 4 Command output

Field

Description

From

RSVP authentication source IP address.

To

RSVP authentication destination IP address.

Mode

Direction of the security association:

·     Receive—Receive security association, used to authenticate messages received from an RSVP neighbor.

·     Send—Send security association, used to authenticate messages sent to an RSVP neighbor.

Type

Type of the security association:

·     Peer—Security association established in RSVP neighbor view.

·     Interface—Security association established in interface view.

·     Global—Security association established in RSVP view.

Key-ID

Key ID of the security association.

·     For a send security association, this field displays the local key ID.

·     For a receive security association, this field displays the key ID received from the peer.

Expiration

Idle timeout remaining time of the security association, in seconds.

 

# Display detailed information about the security associations established with all RSVP neighbors.

<Sysname> display rsvp authentication verbose

From: 20.1.1.1                            To: 4.4.4.9

Mode: Send                                Type: Interface

Challenge: Supported                      Peer: 20.1.1.2

Local key ID: 0x000104000000              Peer key ID: 0x0

Lifetime: 1800 sec                        Expiration time: 1781 sec

Window size: 1

Last sent sequence number:

  5781735195480686593

 

From: 20.1.1.2                            To: 20.1.1.1

Mode: Receive                             Type: Interface

Challenge: Not configured                 Peer: 20.1.1.2

Local key ID: 0x0                         Peer key ID: 0x000104000000

Lifetime: 1800 sec                        Expiration time: 1798 sec

Window size: 1

Received sequence numbers:

  5781742445385482241

Table 5 Command output

Field

Description

From

RSVP authentication source IP address.

To

RSVP authentication destination IP address.

Mode

Direction of the security association:

·     Receive—Receive security association, used to authenticate messages received from an RSVP neighbor.

·     Send—Send security association, used to authenticate messages sent to an RSVP neighbor.

Type

Type of the security association:

·     Peer—Security association established in RSVP neighbor view.

·     Interface—Security association established in interface view.

·     Global—Security association established in RSVP view.

Challenge

State of the authentication challenge-response feature:

·     Not configured—The challenge-response handshake feature is disabled locally. (For a receive security association.)

·     Configured—The challenge-response handshake feature is enabled locally. (For a receive security association.)

·     In progress—The local device has sent an Integrity Challenge message to the peer and is waiting for the Integrity Response message from the peer.

·     Completed—The local device has received an Integrity Response message from the peer and the message has passed the authentication.

·     Failed—The Failed state is displayed when one of the following events occurs:

¡     The local device has received an Integrity Response message from the peer but the message failed the authentication.

¡     The local device has not received any valid Integrity Response after sending three Integrity Challenge messages to the peer.

¡     The challenge-response feature is disabled on the peer.

·     Supported—The local device supports the challenge-response feature. (For a send security association.)

Peer

IP address of the authentication neighbor.

Local key ID

Local key ID, for a send security association.

Peer key ID

Peer key ID, for a receive security association.

Lifetime

Idle timeout of the security association, in seconds.

Expiration time

Idle timeout remaining time of the security association, in seconds.

Window size

Maximum number of out-of-sequence authenticated RSVP messages that can be received.

Received sequence numbers

Sequence numbers of the received messages. This field can display the sequence numbers for a maximum of window-size messages.

Last sent sequence number

Sequence number of the last sent message.

 

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

display rsvp lsp

Use display rsvp lsp to display information about CRLSPs established by RSVP.

Syntax

display rsvp lsp [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ lsp-id lsp-id ] [ verbose ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

destination ip-address: Displays information about the CRLSP with the specified tunnel destination address.

source ip-address: Displays information about the CRLSP with the specified tunnel source address. The tunnel source address is the extended tunnel ID in the Session object of an RSVP message.

tunnel-id tunnel-id: Displays information about the CRLSP with the specified tunnel ID in the range of 0 to 65535.

lsp-id lsp-id: Displays information about the CRLSP with the specified LSP ID in the range of 0 to 65535.

verbose: Displays detailed information about CRLSPs. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information about CRLSPs.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify any parameters, this command displays brief information about all CRLSPs established by RSVP.

Examples

# Display brief information about all CRLSPs established by RSVP.

<Sysname> display rsvp lsp

Destination     Source          Tunnel-ID LSP-ID Direction  Tunnel-name

50.0.0.1        50.0.0.3        0         1      Uni        Sysname_t0

50.0.0.1        50.0.0.3        1         2      Bi-Down    Sysname_t1

Table 6 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Direction

Tunnel direction:

·     Uni—Unidirectional tunnel.

·     Bi-Down—Forward CRLSP of a bidirectional tunnel.

·     Bi-Up—Backward CRLSP of a bidirectional tunnel.

Tunnel-name

Tunnel name. The tunnel ingress node generates the name and notifies other nodes of the name through a Path message.

When the ingress node is an H3C device, the tunnel name is Sysname_ttunnel-ID, where Sysname represents the device name, and tunnel-ID represents the ID of the tunnel. You can configure the device name by executing the sysname command in system view.

This field contains a maximum of 80 characters, and displays the first 77 characters and three dots (.) if the name contains more than 80 characters.

 

# Display detailed information about all CRLSPs established by RSVP.

<Sysname> display rsvp lsp verbose

Tunnel name: Sysname_t1

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 1.1.1.9

Tunnel ID: 1                              LSP ID: 5

LSR type: Transit                         Direction: Unidirectional

Setup priority: 7                         Holding priority: 7

In-Label: 1146                            Out-Label: 3

In-Interface: Vlan10                      Out-Interface: Vlan20

Nexthop: 57.20.20.1                       Exclude-any: 0

Include-Any: 0                            Include-all: 0

Mean rate (CIR): 0.00 kbps                Mean burst size (CBS): 1000.00 bytes

Path MTU: 1500                            Class type: CT0

RRO number: 8

  57.10.10.1/32      Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  57.10.10.2/32      Flag: 0x40 (No FRR/In-Int)

  1146               Flag: 0x01 (Global label)

  2.2.2.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

  57.20.20.2/32      Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  57.20.20.1/32      Flag: 0x40 (No FRR/In-Int)

  3                  Flag: 0x01 (Global label)

  3.3.3.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

Fast Reroute protection: Ready

  FRR inner label: 3           Bypass tunnel: Tunnel253

 

Tunnel name: Sysname_t253

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 2.2.2.9

Tunnel ID: 253                            LSP ID: 17767

LSR type: Ingress                         Direction: Bidirectional, Downstream

Setup priority: 7                         Holding priority: 7

In-Label: -                               Out-Label: 1025

In-Interface: -                           Out-Interface: Vlan30

Nexthop: 10.11.112.135                    Exclude-any: 0

Include-Any: 0                            Include-all: 0

Mean rate (CIR): 125.00 kbps              Mean burst size (CBS): 0.00 bytes

Path MTU: 0                               Class type: CT0

RRO number: 8

  10.11.112.140/32   Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  10.11.112.135/32   Flag: 0x40 (No FRR/In-Int)

  1025               Flag: 0x01 (Global label)

  5.5.5.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

  57.40.40.3/32      Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

  57.40.40.1/32      Flag: 0x40 (No FRR/In-Int)

  3                  Flag: 0x01 (Global label)

  3.3.3.9/32         Flag: 0x20 ((No FRR/Node-ID)

Fast Reroute protection: None

Table 7 Command output

Field

Description

Tunnel name

Tunnel name. The tunnel ingress node generates the name and notifies other nodes of the name through a Path message.

When the ingress node is an H3C device, the tunnel name is Sysname_ttunnel-ID, where Sysname represents the device name, and tunnel-ID represents the ID of the tunnel. You can configure the device name by executing the sysname command in system view.

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Direction

Tunnel direction:

·     Unidirectional—Unidirectional tunnel.

·     Bidirectional, Downstream—Forward CRLSP of a bidirectional tunnel.

·     Bidirectional, Upstream—Backward CRLSP of a bidirectional tunnel.

Exclude-any

Affinity representing a set of attribute filters. Matching any filter renders a link unacceptable.

Include-any

Affinity representing a set of attribute filters. Matching any filter renders a link acceptable.

Include-all

Affinity representing a set of attribute filters. All filters must be present for a link to be acceptable.

Class type

CT of the LSP.

RRO number

Number of Record Route Objects (RROs). If the number is not 0, the subsequent output displays the IP addresses or labels recorded in the RROs.

The RRO information is displayed only when route recording is configured on the tunnel interface.

Flag

Flag value and its meaning in an RRO:

·     No FRR—FRR is not configured.

·     FRR Avail—FRR is available.

·     In use—FRR has occurred.

·     BW—Bandwidth protection.

·     Node-Prot—Node protection.

·     Node-ID—The IP address in the RRO is the LSR ID of the node.

·     In-Int—The IP address in the RRO is address of the incoming interface.

·     Global label—Per-platform label space.

Fast Reroute protection

Whether the tunnel has been bound to an FRR bypass tunnel:

·     None—Not bound to a bypass tunnel.

·     Ready—Bound to a bypass tunnel. No FRR has occurred.

·     Active—Bound to a bypass tunnel. An FRR has occurred.

FRR inner label

Incoming label of the FRR bypass tunnel.

This field is displayed only when a bypass tunnel is bound.

Bypass tunnel

Name of the bypass tunnel.

This field is displayed only when a bypass tunnel is bound.

 

Related commands

display rsvp request

display rsvp reservation

display rsvp sender

display rsvp peer

Use display rsvp peer to display RSVP neighbor information.

Syntax

display rsvp peer [ interface interface-type interface-number ] [ ip ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

interface interface-type interface-number: Displays information about RSVP neighbors connected to the interface specified by its type and number.

ip ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP neighbor specified by its IP address.

verbose: Displays detailed information about RSVP neighbors. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information about RSVP neighbors.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify any parameters, this command displays brief information about all RSVP neighbors.

Examples

# Display brief information about all RSVP neighbors.

<Sysname> display rsvp peer

Peer             Interface                State    Type     Summary refresh

57.10.10.1       Vlan10                   Idle     Active   Enabled

57.20.20.1       Vlan20                   Init     Passive  Disabled

Table 8 Command output

Field

Description

Peer

Address of the RSVP neighbor.

Interface

Interface connected to the RSVP neighbor.

State

Local hello state:

·     Idle—Hello extension is disabled.

·     Init—Hello extension is enabled. The local device failed to exchange hellos with the neighbor or hello exchanges are in progress.

·     Up—Hello extension is enabled. The local device successfully exchanged hellos with the neighbor.

Type

Role of the local device in the neighbor relationship:

·     Active—The local device actively sends hello requests to the neighbor.

·     Passive—The local end passively receives hello requests from the neighbor and replies with hello ACK messages.

Summary refresh

State of the Srefresh feature on the neighbor: Enabled or Disabled.

 

# Display detailed information about all RSVP neighbors.

<Sysname> display rsvp peer verbose

Peer: 57.10.10.1                          Interface: Vlan10

Hello state: Idle                         Hello type: Active

P2P PSB count: 0                          P2P RSB count: 3

P2MP PSB count: 0                         P2MP RSB count: 0

Src instance: 0x32e                       Dst instance: 0x0

Summary refresh: Enabled                  Graceful Restart state: Invalid

Peer GR restart time: 0 ms                Peer GR recovery time: 0 ms

 

Peer: 57.20.20.1                          Interface: Vlan20

Hello state: Init                         Hello type: Active

P2P PSB count: 0                          P2P RSB count: 1

P2MP PSB count: 0                         P2MP RSB count: 0

Src instance: 0x32e                       Dst instance: 0x0

Summary refresh: Disabled                 Graceful Restart state: Ready

Peer GR restart time: 0 ms                Peer GR recovery time: 0 ms

Table 9 Command output

Field

Description

Peer

Address of the RSVP neighbor.

Interface

Interface connected to the RSVP neighbor.

Hello state

Local hello state:

·     Idle—Hello extension is disabled locally.

·     Init—Hello extension is enabled locally. The local device failed to exchange hellos with the neighbor or hello exchanges are in progress.

·     Up—Hello extension is enabled locally. The local device successfully exchanged hellos with the neighbor.

Hello type

Role of the local device in the neighbor relationship:

·     Active—The local device actively sends hello requests to the neighbor.

·     Passive—The local device passively receives hello requests from the neighbor and replies with hello ACK messages.

P2P PSB count

Number of PSBs for the P2P neighbor.

P2P RSB count

Number of RSBs for P2P the neighbor.

P2MP PSB count

This field is not supported in the current software version.

Number of PSBs for the P2MP neighbor.

P2MP RSB count

This field is not supported in the current software version.

Number of RSBs for the P2MP neighbor.

Src instance

Local device instance carried in the hello sent to the neighbor.

Dst instance

Neighbor device instance carried in the last hello received from the neighbor.

Summary refresh

State of the Srefresh feature on the neighbor: Enabled or Disabled.

Graceful Restart state

GR state of the neighbor:

·     Invalid—Neighbor is not GR capable, or GR is disabled locally.

·     Ready—Neighbor is GR capable.

·     Restarting—Neighbor is restarting.

·     Recovering—Neighbor is recovering.

Peer GR restart time

GR restart period of the neighbor, in milliseconds.

Peer GR recovery time

GR recovery period of the neighbor, in milliseconds.

 

display rsvp request

Use display rsvp request to display information about RSVP resource reservation requests sent to upstream devices.

Syntax

display rsvp request [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ prevhop ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

destination ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation requests with the specified tunnel destination address.

source ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation requests with the specified tunnel source address. The tunnel source address is the extended tunnel ID in the Session object of an RSVP message.

tunnel-id tunnel-id: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation requests with the specified tunnel ID. The value range for a tunnel ID is 0 to 65535.

prevhop ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation requests sent to the specified upstream device. The ip-address argument is the address of the destination device of the RSVP resource reservation requests, which is the address of the previous hop on the tunnel.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify any parameters, this command displays brief information about all RSVP resource reservation requests sent to upstream devices.

Examples

# Display brief information about the RSVP resource reservation requests sent to all upstream devices.

<Sysname> display rsvp request

Destination     Source          Tunnel-ID Previous-hop      Style

3.3.3.9         1.1.1.9         1         57.10.10.1        SE

Table 10 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Style

Resource reservation style:

·     SE—Shared-explicit style.

·     FF—Fixed-filter style.

 

# Display detailed information about the RSVP resource reservation requests sent to all upstream devices.

<Sysname> display rsvp request verbose

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 1.1.1.9

Tunnel ID: 1                              Style: SE

Previous hop: 57.10.10.1                  Previous hop LIH: 0xf0008

Sent message epoch: 0                     Sent message ID: 0

Out-Interface: Vlan10                     Refresh interval: 30000 ms

Unknown object number: 0

Flow descriptor 1:

  Flow specification:

    Mean rate (CIR): 50.00 kbps           Mean burst size (CBS): 1000.00 bytes

    Path MTU: 1500                        QoS service: Controlled-Load

  Filter specification 1:

    Sender address: 1.1.1.9               LSP ID: 23

    Label: 1110

Table 11 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Style

Resource reservation style:

·     SE—Shared-explicit style.

·     FF—Fixed-filter style.

Previous hop LIH

Logical interface handle of the previous hop.

Sent message epoch

Value of the Epoch field in the Message ID object of the sent message.

Sent message ID

Message ID in the sent message.

Out-Interface

Outgoing interface of the message.

Refresh interval

Refresh interval for Path and Resv messages, in milliseconds.

Unknown object number

Number of unknown objects.

QoS service

QoS service type: Controlled-Load or Guaranteed.

Sender address

Sender address identifies the tunnel source end.

Label

Incoming label of the LSP.

 

Related commands

display rsvp lsp

display rsvp reservation

display rsvp sender

display rsvp reservation

Use display rsvp reservation to display information about RSVP resource reservation states.

Syntax

display rsvp reservation [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ nexthop ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

destination ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation states with the specified tunnel destination address.

source ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation states with the specified tunnel source address. The tunnel source address is the extended tunnel ID in the Session object of an RSVP message.

tunnel-id tunnel-id: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation states with the specified tunnel ID. The value range for a tunnel ID is 0 to 65535.

nexthop ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP resource reservation states received from the specified downstream device. The ip-address argument is the address of the device that sent the RSVP resource reservation states, which is the address of the next hop on the tunnel.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify any parameters, this command displays brief information about all RSVP resource reservation states.

Examples

# Display brief information about all RSVP resource reservation states.

<Sysname> display rsvp reservation

Destination     Source          Tunnel-ID Nexthop           Style

3.3.3.9         1.1.1.9         1         57.20.20.1        SE

Table 12 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Style

Resource reservation style:

·     SE—Shared-explicit style.

·     FF—Fixed-filter style.

 

# Display detailed information about all RSVP resource reservation states.

<Sysname> display rsvp reservation verbose

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 1.1.1.9

Tunnel ID: 1                              Style: SE

Nexthop: 57.20.20.1                       Nexthop LIH: 0x35

Received message epoch: 0                 Received message ID: 0

In-Interface: Vlan10                      Unknown object number: 0

Flow descriptor 1:

  Flow specification:

    Mean rate (CIR): 50.00 kbps           Mean burst size (CBS): 1000.00 bytes

    Path MTU: 1500                        QoS service: Controlled-Load

  Filter specification 1:

    Sender address: 1.1.1.9               LSP ID: 23

    Label: 3

    RRO number: 3

      57.20.20.1/32      Flag: 0x40 (No FRR/In-Int)

      3                  Flag: 0x01 (Global label)

      3.3.3.9/32         Flag: 0x20 (No FRR/Node-ID)

Table 13 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Style

Resource reservation style:

·     SE—Shared-explicit style.

·     FF—Fixed-filter style.

Nexthop LIH

Logical interface handle of the local outgoing interface for the next hop.

Received message epoch

Value of the Epoch field in the Message ID object of the received message.

Received message ID

Message ID in the received message.

In-Interface

Incoming interface of the message.

Unknown object number

Number of unknown objects.

QoS service

QoS service type: Controlled-Load or Guaranteed.

Sender address

Sender address identifies the tunnel source end.

Label

Outgoing label of the LSP.

RRO number

Number of RROs.

If the number is not 0, the subsequent output displays the IP addresses or labels recorded in the RROs.

The RRO information is displayed only when route recording is configured on the tunnel interface.

Flag

Flag value and its meaning in an RRO:

·     No FRR—FRR is not configured.

·     FRR Avail—FRR is available.

·     In use—FRR has occurred.

·     BW—Bandwidth protection.

·     Node-Prot—Node protection.

·     Node-ID—The IP address in the RRO is the LSR ID of the node.

·     In-Int—The IP address in the RRO is that of the incoming interface.

·     Global label—Per-platform label space.

 

Related commands

display rsvp lsp

display rsvp request

display rsvp sender

display rsvp sender

Use display rsvp sender to display information about RSVP path states.

Syntax

display rsvp sender [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ lsp-id lsp-id ] [ verbose ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

destination ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP path states with the specified tunnel destination address.

source ip-address: Displays information about the RSVP path states with the specified tunnel source address. The tunnel source address is the extended tunnel ID in the Session object of an RSVP message.

tunnel-id tunnel-id: Displays information about the RSVP path states with the specified tunnel ID. The value range for a tunnel ID is 0 to 65535.

lsp-id lsp-id: Displays information about the RSVP path states with the specified LSP ID. The lsp-id argument specifies the ID of a CRLSP, in the range of 0 to 65535.

verbose: Displays detailed information. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays brief information.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify any parameters, this command displays brief information about all RSVP path states.

Examples

# Display brief information about all RSVP path states.

<Sysname> display rsvp sender

Destination     Source          Tunnel-ID LSP-ID  Style     Bitrate

3.3.3.9         1.1.1.9         1         5       SE        0.00

3.3.3.9         2.2.2.9         253       17767   SE        125.00

Table 14 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

Tunnel source address.

Style

Resource reservation style:

·     SE—Shared-explicit style.

·     FF—Fixed-filter style.

Bitrate

Tunnel bandwidth in kbps.

 

# Display detailed information about all RSVP path states.

<Sysname> display rsvp sender verbose

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 1.1.1.9

Tunnel ID: 1                              Style: SE

Sender address: 1.1.1.9                   LSP ID: 5

Setup priority: 7                         Holding priority: 7

FRR desired: Yes                          BW protection desired: Yes

Received upstream label: 1051             Sent upstream label: 1051

Previous hop: 57.10.10.1                  Previous hop LIH: 0xf0008

Mean rate (CIR): 0.00 kbps                Mean burst size (CBS): 1000.00 bytes

MTU: 1500                                 Qos service: Controlled-Load

Received message epoch: 0                 Received message ID: 0

Sent message epoch: 0                     Sent message ID: 0

In-Interface: Vlan10                      Local LIH: 0x35

Local address: 57.20.20.2                 Refresh interval: 30000 ms

Out-Interface: Vlan20                     Nexthop: 57.20.20.1

Unknown object number: 0

Received ERO number: 2

  57.10.10.2/32      Strict

  57.20.20.1/32      Loose

Sent ERO number: 1

  57.20.20.1/32      Loose

XRO number: 2

  67.10.10.1/32

  67.20.20.1/32

RRO number: 1

  57.10.10.1/32      Flag: 0x00 (No FRR)

Fast Reroute PLR: Active

  FRR inner label: 3                      Bypass tunnel: Tunnel253

  Sender Template:

    Sender address: 10.11.112.140         LSP ID: 5

  FRR ERO number: 1

    3.3.3.9/32         Strict

Fast Reroute MP: None

 

Destination: 3.3.3.9                      Source: 2.2.2.9

Tunnel ID: 253                            Style: SE

Sender address: 2.2.2.9                   LSP ID: 17767

Setup priority: 7                         Holding priority: 7

FRR desired: Yes                          BW protection desired: Yes

Received upstream label: 1115             Sent upstream label: 1115

Previous hop: 57.10.10.1                  Previous hop LIH: 0xf0008

Mean rate (CIR): 125.00 kbps              Mean burst size (CBS): 0.00 bytes

MTU: 1500                                 Qos service: Controlled-Load

Received message epoch: 0                 Received message ID: 0

Sent message epoch: 0                     Sent message ID: 0

In-Interface: Vlan10                      Local LIH: 0x67

Local address: 10.11.112.140              Refresh interval: 30000 ms

Out-Interface: Vlan30                     Nexthop: 10.11.112.135

Unknown object number: 0

Received ERO number: 5

  2.2.2.9/32         Strict

  10.11.112.140/32   Strict

  10.11.112.135/32   Strict

  57.40.40.3/32      Strict

  57.40.40.1/32      Strict

Sent ERO number: 3

  10.11.112.135/32   Strict

  57.40.40.3/32      Strict

  57.40.40.1/32      Strict

XRO number: 1

  67.40.40.1/32

RRO number: 0

Fast Reroute PLR: None

Fast Reroute MP: Active

  In-Interface: Vlan10

  Sender Template:

    Sender address: 10.11.112.140         LSP ID: 5

Table 15 Command output

Field

Description

Destination

Tunnel destination address.

Source

LSR ID of the device at the tunnel source end.

Style

Resource reservation style:

·     SE—Shared-explicit style.

·     FF—Fixed-filter style.

Sender address

Sender address identifies the tunnel source end.

FRR desired

State of FRR: Yes or No.

BW protection desired

State of bandwidth protection: Yes or No.

Received upstream label

Backward LSP label received from the upstream device.

Sent upstream label

Backward LSP label sent to the downstream device.

Previous hop LIH

Logical interface handle of the previous hop.

QoS service

QoS service type: Controlled-Load or Guaranteed.

Received message Epoch

Value of the Epoch field in the Message ID object of the received message.

Received message ID

Message ID in the received message.

Sent message epoch

Value of the Epoch field in the Message ID object of the sent message.

Sent message ID

Message ID in the sent message.

In-Interface

Incoming interface of the message.

Local LIH

Local logical interface handle.

Local address

IP address of the outgoing interface of the Path message.

Refresh interval

Refresh interval for Path and Resv messages, in milliseconds.

Out-Interface

Outgoing interface of the message.

Unknown object number

Number of unknown objects.

Received ERO number

Number of received Explicit Route Objects (EROs) and the ERO information.

ERO information includes the addresses of the nodes on the explicit path, and whether the current node is a loose or strict next hop.

Sent ERO number

Number of sent EROs and the ERO information.

ERO information includes the addresses of the nodes on the explicit path, and whether the current node is a loose or strict next hop.

XRO number

Number of Exclude Route Objects (XROs).

If the number is not 0, the subsequent output displays the IP addresses in the XROs.

The IP addresses are the addresses of interfaces or the LSR IDs of the nodes that are to be excluded from routes. The addresses in the XROs are non-sequenced.

RRO number

Number of Record Route Objects (RROs).

If the number is not 0, the subsequent output displays the IP addresses or labels recorded in the RROs.

The RRO information is displayed only when route recording is configured on the tunnel interface.

Flag

Flag value and its meaning in an RRO:

·     No FRR—FRR is not configured.

·     FRR Avail—FRR is available.

·     In use—FRR has occurred.

·     BW—Bandwidth protection.

·     Node-Prot—Node protection.

·     Node-ID—The IP address in the RRO is the LSR ID of the node.

·     In-Int—The IP address in the RRO is that of the incoming interface.

·     Global label—Per-platform label space.

Fast Reroute PLR

Point of Local Repair (PLR) information:

·     None—Not bound to an FRR bypass tunnel.

·     Ready—Bound to an FRR bypass tunnel. No FRR has occurred.

·     Active—Bound to an FRR bypass tunnel. An FRR has occurred.

FRR inner label

Incoming label of the FRR bypass tunnel. Only the PLR node displays this field.

Bypass tunnel

Name of the bypass tunnel. Only the PLR node displays this field.

Sender address

Address of the Path message sender after an FRR. The value of this field is the address of the outgoing interface of the bypass tunnel on the PLR node.

LSP ID

LSP ID carried in the Path message after an FRR.

Fast Reroute MP

Merge Point (MP) information:

·     Active—The node is an MP and an FRR has occurred.

·     None—The node is not an MP, or the node is an MP but no FRR has occurred.

In-Interface

Incoming interface of the message.

 

Related commands

display rsvp lsp

display rsvp request

display rsvp reservation

display rsvp statistics

Use display rsvp statistics to display RSVP statistics.

Syntax

display rsvp statistics [ interface [ interface-type interface-number ] ]

Views

Any view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

network-operator

mdc-admin

mdc-operator

Parameters

interface: Displays RSVP statistics on interfaces. If you do not specify this keyword, the command displays global RSVP statistics.

interface-type interface-number: Displays RSVP statistics on the interface specified by its type and number. If you specify the interface keyword without this argument, the command displays RSVP statistics on all RSVP-enabled interfaces.

Examples

# Display global RSVP statistics.

<Sysname> display rsvp statistics

P2P statistics:

Object                 Added            Deleted

  PSB                  3                1

  RSB                  3                1

  LSP                  3                1

P2MP statistics:

Object                 Added            Deleted

  PSB                  0                0

  RSB                  0                0

  LSP                  0                0

 

Packet                 Received         Sent

  Path                 5                5

  Resv                 5                5

  PathError            0                0

  ResvError            0                0

  PathTear             0                0

  ResvTear             0                0

  ResvConf             0                0

  Bundle               0                0

  Ack                  0                0

  Srefresh             0                0

  Hello                0                0

  Challenge            0                0

  Response             0                0

  Error                0                0

# Display RSVP statistics on interfaces.

<Sysname> display rsvp statistics interface

Vlan10:

Packet                 Received         Sent

  Path                 2                2

  Resv                 2                2

  PathError            0                0

  ResvError            0                0

  PathTear             0                0

  ResvTear             0                0

  ResvConf             0                0

  Bundle               0                0

  Ack                  0                0

  Srefresh             0                0

  Hello                0                0

  Challenge            0                0

  Response             0                0

  Error                0                0

 

Vlan20:

Packet                 Received         Sent

  Path                 3                3

  Resv                 3                3

  PathError            0                0

  ResvError            0                0

  PathTear             0                0

  ResvTear             0                0

  ResvConf             0                0

  Bundle               0                0

  Ack                  0                0

  Srefresh             0                0

  Hello                0                0

  Challenge            0                0

  Response             0                0

  Error                0                0

Table 16 Command output

Field

Description

P2P statistics

P2P statistics.

PSB

Number of added/deleted PSBs.

RSB

Number of added/deleted RSBs.

LSP

Number of added/deleted LSPs.

P2MP statistics

This field is not supported in the current software version.

P2MP statistics.

Path

Number of received/sent Path messages.

Resv

Number of received/sent Resv messages.

PathError

Number of received/sent Path Error messages.

ResvError

Number of received/sent Resv Error messages.

PathTear

Number of received/sent Path Tear messages.

ResvTear

Number of received/sent Resv Tear messages.

ResvConf

Number of received/sent Resv Conf messages.

Bundle

Number of received/sent Bundle messages.

Ack

Number of received/sent Ack messages.

Srefresh

Number of received/sent Srefresh messages.

Hello

Number of received/sent Hello messages.

Challenge

Number of received/sent Integrity Challenge messages.

Response

Number of received/sent Integrity Response messages.

Error

Number of received/sent error messages.

 

Related commands

reset rsvp statistics

dscp

Use dscp to set a DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets.

Use undo dscp to restore the default.

Syntax

dscp dscp-value

undo dscp

Default

The DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets is 48.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

dscp-value: Specifies a DSCP value in the range of 0 to 63.

Usage guidelines

The DSCP value of an IP packet specifies the priority level of the packet and affects the transmission priority of the packet.

Examples

# Set the DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets to 56.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] dscp 56

Related commands

display rsvp

graceful-restart enable

Use graceful-restart enable to enable RSVP GR.

Use undo graceful-restart enable to disable RSVP GR.

Syntax

graceful-restart enable

undo graceful-restart enable

Default

RSVP GR is disabled.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

RSVP supports only the GR helper feature. The device is not able to perform GR, but it can help neighbor devices to perform GR.

Nonstop forwarding (NSF) is implemented between active and standby processes on the device.

The local device can act as a GR helper for the RSVP neighbor connected to an interface only after the following features are enabled on that interface:

·     RSVP GR (configured by the graceful-restart enable command).

·     RSVP hello extension (configured by the rsvp hello enable command).

Examples

# Enable RSVP GR globally.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] graceful-restart enable

Related commands

rsvp hello enable

hello interval

Use hello interval to set the interval for sending hello requests.

Use undo hello interval to restore the default.

Syntax

hello interval interval

undo hello interval

Default

Hello request messages are sent at an interval of 5 seconds.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

interval: Specifies the interval at which RSVP sends hello requests, in the range of 1 to 60 seconds.

Usage guidelines

If no hello request is received from a neighbor within the hello interval, the device sends a hello request to the neighbor. If the device receives a hello request from a neighbor within the interval, it immediately replies the neighbor with a hello ACK message.

The hello interval command takes effect only on interfaces that have the RSVP hello extension feature enabled (by using the rsvp hello enable command).

Examples

# Set the interval for sending hello request messages to 10 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] hello interval 10

Related commands

hello lost

rsvp hello enable

hello lost

Use hello lost to set the maximum number of consecutive lost or erroneous hellos.

Use undo hello lost to restore the default.

Syntax

hello lost times

undo hello lost

Default

The maximum number of consecutive lost or erroneous hellos is 4.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

times: Specifies the maximum number of consecutive lost or erroneous hellos, in the range of 3 to 10.

Usage guidelines

When a device sends a hello to a neighbor but the device does not receive any replies within an interval, the hello is lost. The device determines that the neighbor fails when the number of consecutive lost hellos or erroneous hellos from the neighbor reaches the maximum (configured by this command).

If RSVP GR is enabled, the local device acts as a GR helper to help the neighbor to perform GR. If RSVP GR is disabled but FRR is enabled on the local device, it performs an FRR.

This command takes effect only after the RSVP hello extension feature has been enabled by using the rsvp hello enable command.

If the maximum number is too big, neighbor failures cannot be promptly detected. If the maximum number is too small, an operating neighbor might be regarded failed.

Examples

# Set the maximum number of consecutive lost or erroneous hellos to 6.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] hello lost 6

Related commands

hello interval

rsvp hello enable

keep-multiplier

Use keep-multiplier to set the PSB and RSB timeout multiplier.

Use undo keep-multiplier to restore the default.

Syntax

keep-multiplier number

undo keep-multiplier

Default

The PSB and RSB timeout multiplier is 3.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

number: Specifies the PSB and RSB timeout multiplier in the range of 3 to 255.

Usage guidelines

The PSB and RSB timeout is computed in this formula: Timeout = (keep-multiplier+0.5) × 1.5 × refresh-time. Refresh-time is the interval at which the peer device advertises the Path and Resv messages to the local device.

To prevent too many PSBs and RSBs from occupying system resources, the device removes a PSB or RSB if no Path or Resv message is received within the timeout interval.

Examples

# Set the PSB and RSB timeout multiplier to 5.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] keep-multiplier 5

Related commands

refresh interval

peer

Use peer to create an RSVP authentication neighbor and enter its view, or enter the view of an existing RSVP authentication neighbor.

Use undo peer to delete an RSVP authentication neighbor.

Syntax

peer ip-address

undo peer ip-address

Default

No RSVP authentication neighbors exist.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

ip-address: Specifies an RSVP authentication neighbor by its IP address.

Usage guidelines

After this command is executed, you can configure RSVP authentication information for the specified RSVP neighbor, such as the authentication key and idle timeout of the security association.

After the device receives an RSVP message with an authentication object, it checks whether it has an RSVP authentication neighbor that matches one of the following addresses:

·     The IP address in PHOP of the message (Path or Path Tear message).

·     The source IP address in the message (message other than Path and Path Tear).

If a matching neighbor exists and an authentication key has been configured for the neighbor, the device verifies the validity of the message according to the key. If no authentication key is configured for the neighbor, the device uses the authentication key configured in interface view or RSVP view to verify the message validity. If no authentication key is configured in any view, the device ignores the authentication object carried in the message and accepts the message.

When sending an RSVP message, the device checks whether it has a matching authentication neighbor according to the next hop address for the destination address in the RSVP message. If a matching neighbor exists and an authentication key has been configured for the neighbor, the device sets the authentication object of the message according to the key. If no authentication key is configured for the neighbor, the device uses the authentication key configured in interface view or RSVP view to set the authentication object. If no authentication key is configured in any view, the device does not add an authentication object in the message.

If an FRR occurs, the downstream authentication neighbor of the PLR node is the destination IP address of the bypass tunnel. The upstream authentication neighbor of the MP node is the IP address of the physical outgoing interface of the bypass tunnel on the PLR.

Examples

# Create RSVP authentication neighbor 1.1.1.1, enter RSVP neighbor view, and configure a plaintext authentication key of abcdfegh for the neighbor.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] peer 1.1.1.1

[Sysname-rsvp-peer-1.1.1.1] authentication key plain abcdfegh

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

refresh interval

Use refresh interval to set the refresh interval for Path and Resv messages.

Use undo refresh interval to restore the default.

Syntax

refresh interval interval

undo refresh interval

Default

The refresh interval for Path and Resv messages is 30 seconds.

Views

RSVP view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

interval: Specifies the interval at which RSVP refreshes Path and Resv messages, in the range of 10 to 65535 seconds.

Usage guidelines

This command performs the following operations:

·     Determines the interval for sending Path and Resv messages.

·     Adds the locally configured refresh interval in the sent Path and Resv messages, so the peer device can use this value to calculate the PSB and RSB timeout.

Examples

# Set the refresh interval for Path and Resv messages to 60 seconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] refresh interval 60

Related commands

keep-multiplier

reset rsvp authentication

Use reset rsvp authentication to clear RSVP security associations.

Syntax

reset rsvp authentication [ from ip-address to ip-address ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

from ip-address: Clears the RSVP security associations with the specified authentication source IP address.

to ip-address: Clears the RSVP security associations with the specified authentication destination IP address.

Usage guidelines

If you do not specify the from ip-address to ip-address options, this command clears the security associations established with all RSVP neighbors.

Examples

# Clear all RSVP security associations.

<Sysname> reset rsvp authentication

# Clear the RSVP security association sourced from 1.1.1.1 to 2.2.2.2.

<Sysname> reset rsvp authentication from 1.1.1.1 to 2.2.2.2

Related commands

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp statistics

Use reset rsvp statistics to clear RSVP statistics.

Syntax

reset rsvp statistics [ interface [ interface-type interface-number ] ]

Views

User view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

interface: Clears RSVP statistics on interfaces. If you do not specify this keyword, the command clears global RSVP statistics.

interface-type interface-number: Clears RSVP statistics on the interface specified by its type and number. If you specify the interface keyword without this argument, the command clears RSVP statistics on all RSVP-enabled interfaces.

Examples

# Clear global RSVP statistics.

<Sysname> reset rsvp statistics

# Clear RSVP statistics on all RSVP-enabled interfaces.

<Sysname> reset rsvp statistics interface

Related commands

display rsvp statistics

rsvp

Use rsvp to enable RSVP globally and enter RSVP view.

Use undo rsvp to disable RSVP globally.

Syntax

rsvp

undo rsvp

Default

RSVP is disabled globally.

Views

System view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

To enable global RSVP, you must enable both global RSVP (by using the rsvp command) and global MPLS TE (by using the mpls te command).

Examples

# Enable RSVP globally and enter RSVP view.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp]

Related commands

mpls te

rsvp enable

rsvp authentication challenge

Use rsvp authentication challenge to enable RSVP challenge-response handshake on an interface.

Use undo rsvp authentication challenge to disable RSVP challenge-response handshake on an interface.

Syntax

rsvp authentication challenge

undo rsvp authentication challenge

Default

RSVP challenge-response handshake is disabled on an interface.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

To prevent packet replay attacks, RSVP requires received authentication messages to carry incremental sequence numbers. RSVP saves the sequence number of the last valid message in a receive-type security association to verify the subsequent messages. However, when RSVP creates a new receive-type security association, it cannot obtain the sequence number of the sender. To successfully establish the receive-type security association, RSVP sets the receive sequence number to 0 by default. Then, the association can receive a message with any sequence number from the peer. Because this introduces a vulnerability to replay attacks, you should execute the authentication challenge command. When RSVP creates a receive-type security association, it will perform a challenge-response handshake to obtain the sequence number of the sender.

RSVP challenge-response handshake can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified RSVP neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

Examples

# Enable RSVP challenge-response handshake on VLAN-interface 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp authentication challenge

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

rsvp authentication key

Use rsvp authentication key to enable RSVP authentication on an interface and configure the authentication key.

Use undo rsvp authentication key to disable RSVP authentication on an interface.

Syntax

rsvp authentication key { cipher | plain } string

undo rsvp authentication key

Default

RSVP authentication is disabled.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

cipher: Specifies an authentication key in encrypted form.

plain: Specifies an authentication key in plaintext form. For security purposes, the key specified in plaintext form will be stored in encrypted form.

string: Specifies the authentication key. Its plaintext form is a case-sensitive string of 1 to 16 characters. Its encrypted form is a case-sensitive string of 1 to 53 characters.

Usage guidelines

RSVP authentication ensures integrity of RSVP messages, preventing fake resource reservation requests from occupying network resources.

RSVP uses MD5 to calculate a digest for the authentication key and the message body, adds the digest to the message, and sends the message. When the peer receives the message, it performs the same calculation and compares the calculated digest with the digest in the message. If the two digests are the same, the message passes the RSVP authentication and is accepted. If the two digests are different, the peer device discards the message.

RSVP authentication can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified RSVP neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

Configurations in RSVP neighbor view, interface view, and RSVP view are in descending order of priority. If RSVP authentication for a neighbor is enabled in both RSVP neighbor view and RSVP view, the authentication key configured in RSVP neighbor view is used.

To re-establish a security association, you must delete the authentication key used by the current security association or delete the current security association (using the reset rsvp authentication command). Then, the device can re-establish a security association by looking up a new authentication key in order of priorities.

After RSVP authentication is enabled on the local device, you must also enable RSVP authentication and configure the same authentication key on the RSVP neighbor.

Examples

# Enable RSVP authentication and configure an authentication key of abcdefgh on VLAN-interface 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp authentication key plain abcdefgh

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp authentication window-size

rsvp authentication lifetime

Use rsvp authentication lifetime to set the idle timeout for RSVP security associations on an interface.

Use undo rsvp authentication lifetime to restore the default.

Syntax

rsvp authentication lifetime life-time

undo rsvp authentication lifetime

Default

The idle timeout for RSVP security associations is 1800 seconds on an interface.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

life-time: Specifies the RSVP security association idle timeout in the range of 30 to 86400 seconds.

Usage guidelines

When RSVP authentication is enabled, the device dynamically establishes security associations when receiving and sending RSVP messages to record the message sequence numbers, which are used in RSVP authentication.

To release memory resources, each security association has an idle timeout. When a security association is idle for the specified timeout time, the device deletes the security association. When the device sends or receives an authenticated RSVP message, it resets the idle timeout timer for the corresponding security association.

The RSVP authentication idle timeout can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified RSVP neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

An RSVP security association established by using the authentication key configured in a view uses the idle timeout configured in the same view.

A modification to the idle timeout affects only security associations established after the modification. To apply the modification to existing security associations, you must execute the reset rsvp authentication command to delete and then re-establish the security associations.

Examples

# Set the idle timeout for RSVP security associations to 100 seconds on VLAN-interface 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp authentication lifetime 100

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication window-size

rsvp authentication window-size

Use rsvp authentication window-size to set the RSVP authentication window size, which is the maximum number of authenticated RSVP messages that can be received out of sequence on an interface.

Use undo rsvp authentication window-size to restore the default.

Syntax

rsvp authentication window-size number

undo rsvp authentication window-size

Default

Only one authenticated RSVP message can be received out of sequence on an interface.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

number: Specifies the maximum number of authenticated RSVP messages that can be received out of sequence, in the range of 1 to 64.

Usage guidelines

To protect against replay attacks, the sender places a unique sequence number in each RSVP message that contains authentication information. The sender increases the value of the sequence number by one each time it sends an RSVP message. If the sequence number of a received message is in the specified authentication window size, the receiver accepts the message. If it is not in the specified authentication window size, the receiver discards the message.

When the receiver receives an RSVP message, it compares the sequence number of the last accepted RSVP message with the sequence number of the newly received RSVP message.

·     If the new sequence number is greater than the last sequence number, RSVP accepts the message and updates the last sequence number with the new sequence number.

·     If the received sequence number equals the last sequence number, RSVP regards the message a replay message and discards the message.

·     If the new sequence number is smaller than the last sequence number but greater than the new sequence number minus the window size, and has never been received before, RSVP accepts the message. If the new sequence number has been received before, RSVP regards the message a replay message and discards the message.

·     If the new sequence number is smaller than the new sequence number minus the window size, RSVP regards the message invalid and discards the message.

By default, the authentication window size is 1. If the sequence number of a newly received RSVP message is smaller than that of the last accepted message, the device discards the message.

If the sender sends multiple RSVP messages in a short time, these messages might arrive at the neighbor out of sequence. If you use the default window size, the out-of-sequence messages will be discarded. To solve this problem, you can use the rsvp authentication window-size command to configure a correct window size.

A security association established by using the authentication key configured in a view uses the window size configured in that view.

A modification to the window size affects only security associations established after the modification. To apply the new setting to existing security associations, you must execute the reset rsvp authentication command to delete and then re-establish the security associations.

Examples

# Set the maximum number of out-of-sequence authenticated RSVP messages that can be received on VLAN-interface 10 to 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp authentication window-size 10

Related commands

authentication challenge

authentication key

authentication lifetime

authentication window-size

display rsvp authentication

reset rsvp authentication

rsvp authentication challenge

rsvp authentication key

rsvp authentication lifetime

rsvp bfd enable

Use rsvp bfd enable to enable BFD for RSVP on an interface.

Use undo rsvp bfd enable to restore the default.

Syntax

rsvp bfd enable

undo rsvp bfd enable

Default

RSVP-TE does not use BFD to detect the link status to an RSVP neighbor.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

By sending hellos, RSVP cannot promptly detect neighbor status. By executing this command on an interface, a BFD session is established to detect the link status to the RSVP neighbor on the interface. When the neighbor fails, BFD can quickly detect the failure and notify RSVP of the failure so RSVP can respond as configured, for example, performs an FRR.

Examples

# Enable BFD to detect the link status to the RSVP neighbor on VLAN-interface 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp bfd enable

rsvp enable

Use rsvp enable to enable RSVP on an interface.

Use undo rsvp enable to disable RSVP on an interface.

Syntax

rsvp enable

undo rsvp enable

Default

RSVP is disabled on an interface.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

Before you enable RSVP on an interface, you must first enable RSVP globally by using the rsvp command in system view.

Examples

# Enable RSVP on VLAN-interface 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] rsvp

[Sysname-rsvp] quit

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp enable

Related commands

rsvp

rsvp hello enable

Use rsvp hello enable to enable RSVP hello extension.

Use undo rsvp hello enable to disable RSVP hello extension.

Syntax

rsvp hello enable

undo rsvp hello enable

Default

RSVP hello extension is disabled.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Usage guidelines

With RSVP hello extension enabled, an interface sends and receives hello messages to detect the neighbor status.

Examples

# Enable RSVP hello extension on VLAN-interface 10.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp hello enable

Related commands

hello interval

hello lost

rsvp reduction retransmit increment

Use rsvp reduction retransmit increment to set the RSVP message retransmission increment value.

Use undo rsvp reduction retransmit increment to restore the default.

Syntax

rsvp reduction retransmit increment increment-value

undo rsvp reduction retransmit increment

Default

The RSVP message retransmission increment is 1.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

increment-value: Specifies the RSVP message retransmission increment in the range of 1 to 10.

Usage guidelines

After the rsvp reduction srefresh reliability command is executed, the retransmission increment and retransmission interval together determine the time for the next transmission of the RSVP message. For more information, see the usage guidelines in the rsvp reduction srefresh command.

Examples

# On VLAN-interface 10, set the RSVP message retransmission increment value to 2.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp reduction retransmit increment 2

Related commands

rsvp reduction retransmit interval

rsvp reduction srefresh

rsvp reduction retransmit interval

Use rsvp reduction retransmit interval to set the RSVP message retransmission interval.

Use undo rsvp reduction retransmit interval to restore the default.

Syntax

rsvp reduction retransmit interval interval

undo rsvp reduction retransmit interval

Default

The RSVP message retransmission interval is 500 milliseconds.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

interval: Specifies the RSVP message retransmission interval in the range of 500 to 3000 milliseconds.

Usage guidelines

After the rsvp reduction srefresh reliability command is executed, the retransmission increment and retransmission interval together determine the time for the next transmission of the RSVP message. For more information, see the usage guidelines in the rsvp reduction srefresh command.

Examples

# On VLAN-interface 10, set the RSVP message retransmission interval to 1000 milliseconds.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp reduction retransmit interval 1000

Related commands

rsvp reduction retransmit increment

rsvp reduction srefresh

rsvp reduction srefresh

Use rsvp reduction srefresh to enable summary refresh and reliable RSVP message delivery.

Use undo rsvp reduction srefresh to disable summary refresh and reliable RSVP message delivery.

Syntax

rsvp reduction srefresh [ reliability ]

undo rsvp reduction srefresh

Default

Summary refresh and reliable RSVP message delivery are disabled.

Views

Interface view

Predefined user roles

network-admin

mdc-admin

Parameters

reliability: Enables reliable RSVP message delivery. If you do not specify this keyword, the command enables only the summary refresh feature.

Usage guidelines

RSVP sends Path and Resv messages with the same states and objects to maintain the path and reservation states at intervals (configured by the refresh interval command). These messages are collectively referred to as refresh messages. Refresh messages are used to synchronize the path and reservation states on RSVP neighbors and to recover from lost RSVP messages.

When multiple RSVP sessions exist on a network, the periodically sent refresh messages can cause network degradation. In this case, the refreshing interval of Path and Resv messages should not be too short. However, delay sensitive applications want to recover from lost RSVP messages through the refresh messages as soon as possible. In this case, the refreshing interval should not be too long. You can use the summary refresh (Srefresh) and the reliable RSVP message delivery features to find the appropriate balance.

Srefresh is implemented by adding a Message_ID object to a Path or Resv message to uniquely identify the message. To refresh Path and Resv states, RSVP does not need to send standard Path and Resv messages. Instead, it can send a summary refresh message at regular intervals (configured by the refresh interval command). The message carries a set of Message_ID objects that identify the Path and Resv states to be refreshed. The Srefresh feature reduces the number of refresh messages on the network and speeds up the refresh message processing.

Reliable RSVP message delivery requires the peer device to acknowledge each RSVP message received from the local device. If no acknowledgment is received, the local device retransmits the message.

To implement reliable RSVP message delivery, a node sends an RSVP message that includes a Message_ID object in which the ACK_Desired flag is set. The receiver needs to confirm the delivery by sending back a message that includes the Message_ID_ACK object. If the sender does not receive a Message_ID_ACK within the retransmission interval (Rf), it performs the following operations:

·     Retransmits the message when Rf expire.

·     Sets the next transmission interval to (1 + delta) × Rf.

The sender repeats this process until it receives the Message_ID_ACK before the retransmission time expires or it has transmitted the message three times.

The initial value of Rf is configured by the rsvp reduction retransmit interval command. The delta value is configured by the rsvp reduction retransmit increment command.

After the summary refresh is enabled, RSVP maintains the path and reservation states by sending Srefresh messages rather than standard refresh messages.

Examples

# On VLAN-interface 10, enable summary refresh and reliable RSVP message delivery.

<Sysname> system-view

[Sysname] interface vlan-interface 10

[Sysname-Vlan-interface10] rsvp reduction srefresh reliability

Related commands

refresh interval

rsvp reduction retransmit increment

rsvp reduction retransmit interval