07-MPLS Configuration Guide

HomeSupportResource CenterH3C S6800[S6860][S6861] (R27xx) & S6820 (R630x) Switch Series Configuration Guide-6W10107-MPLS Configuration Guide
07-RSVP configuration
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07-RSVP configuration 205.77 KB

Configuring RSVP

About RSVP

The Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) is a signaling protocol that reserves resources on a network. Extended RSVP supports MPLS label distribution and allows resource reservation information to be transmitted with label bindings. This extended RSVP is called RSVP-TE. RSVP-TE is a label distribution protocol for MPLS TE. It distributes MPLS labels and reserves resources on the nodes of a specific path to establish a CRLSP.

RSVP messages

RSVP uses the following types of messages:

·     Path messages—Sent by the sender downstream along the data transmission path to save path state information on each node along the path.

·     Resv messages—Sent by the receiver upstream towards the sender to request resource reservation and to create and maintain reservation state on each node along the reverse data transmission path.

·     PathTear messages—Sent downstream by the sender or a transit node to remove the path state and related reservation state on each node along the path.

·     ResvTear messages—Sent upstream by the receiver or a transit node to remove the reservation state on each node along the path.

·     PathErr messages—Sent upstream by the receiver or a transit node to report Path message processing errors to the sender. They do not affect the state of the nodes along the path.

·     ResvErr messages—Sent downstream by the sender or a transit node to notify the downstream nodes of an Resv message processing error or of a reservation error caused by preemption.

·     ResvConf messages—Sent to the receiver to confirm Resv messages.

·     Hello messages—Sent between any two directly connected RSVP neighbors to set up and maintain the neighbor relationship. Hello messages are sent only when the RSVP hello extension has been enabled.

RSVP-TE extensions to RSVP messages

RSVP-TE extends RSVP by adding new objects to Path and Resv messages. In addition to label bindings, these objects also carry routing constraints to support CRLSP and FRR.

New objects added to the Path message:

·     LABEL_REQUEST—Requests the downstream node to allocate a label.

·     EXPLICIT_ROUTE—Carries the path information calculated by the ingress node, making sure the CRLSP is set up along that path.

·     RECORD_ROUTE—Records the path that the CRLSP actually traverses and the label allocated by each node on the path.

·     SESSION_ATTRIBUTE—Carries the MPLS TE tunnel attributes, such as the setup priority, holding priority, and affinity.

New objects added to the Resv message:

·     LABEL—Advertises the label allocated by the downstream node to the upstream node.

·     RECORD_ROUTE—Records the path that the CRLSP actually traverses and the label allocated by each node on the path.

CRLSP setup procedure

As shown in Figure 1, a CRLSP is set up by using the following steps:

1.     The ingress LSR generates a Path message that carries LABEL_REQUEST, and then forwards the message along the path calculated by CSPF hop-by-hop towards the egress LSR.

2.     After receiving the Path message, the egress LSR generates a Resv message carrying the reservation information and the LABEL object. It forwards the Resv message to the ingress LSR along the reverse direction of the path that the Path message traveled.

The Resv message advertises labels, reserves resources, and creates a reserve state on each LSR it passes, so QoS can be guaranteed for services transmitted on the CRLSP.

3.     When the ingress LSR receives the Resv message, the CRLSP is established.

Figure 1 Setting up a CRLSP

 

RSVP refresh mechanism

Refresh messages

RSVP maintains resource reservation states on a node by periodically sending messages.

The resource reservation states include path states and reservation states. A path state is saved in a path state block (PSB), and a reservation state is saved in a reservation state block (RSB). A PSB is created by a Path message and saves the LABEL_REQUEST object. A RSB is created by a Resv message and saves the LABEL object.

The path states and reservation states are refreshed periodically by Path and Resv messages. A state is removed if no refresh messages for the state are received in a certain interval, and the CRLSP established based on this state is also removed.

The Path and Resv messages for refreshing the resource reservation states are collectively referred to as refresh messages. Refresh messages can also be used to recover from lost RSVP messages.

When multiple RSVP sessions exist on a network, a short refresh interval can cause network degradation, but a long refresh interval cannot meet the requirements of delay sensitive applications. To find an appropriate balance, you can use the summary refresh (Srefresh) and the reliable RSVP message delivery features.

Srefresh

Srefresh is implemented by adding a Message_ID object to a Path or Resv message to uniquely identify the message. To refresh Path and Resv states, RSVP does not need to send standard Path and Resv messages. Instead, it sends an Srefresh message carrying a set of Message_ID objects that identify the Path and Resv states to be refreshed. The Srefresh feature reduces the number of refresh messages on the network and speeds up refresh message processing.

Reliable RSVP message delivery

An RSVP sender cannot know or retransmit lost RSVP messages. The reliable RSVP message delivery mechanism is designed to ensure reliable transmission.

This mechanism requires the peer device to acknowledge each RSVP message received from the local device. If no acknowledgment is received, the local device retransmits the message.

To implement reliable RSVP message delivery, a node sends an RSVP message that includes a Message_ID object in which the ACK_Desired flag is set. The receiver needs to confirm the delivery by sending back a message that includes the Message_ID_ACK object. If the sender does not receive a Message_ID_ACK within the retransmission interval (Rf), it performs the following tasks:

·     Retransmits the message when Rf expires.

·     Sets the next transmission interval to (1 + delta) × Rf.

The sender repeats this process until it receives the Message_ID_ACK before the retransmission time expires or it has transmitted the message three times.

RSVP authentication

RSVP authentication ensures integrity of RSVP messages, and prevents false resource reservation requests from occupying network resources.

With RSVP authentication, the sender uses the MD5 algorithm and the authentication key to calculate a message digest for an RSVP message, and inserts the digest to the RSVP message. When the receiver receives the message, it performs the same calculation and compares the result with the message digest. If they match, the receiver accepts the message. Otherwise, it drops the message.

By carrying a sequence number in a message, RSVP authentication can also prevent packet replay attacks. The device records the sequence number of a received RSVP message, and determines whether the subsequent messages are valid according to the recorded sequence number. If the sequence number of a subsequent message is within the valid range, the device accepts the message. Otherwise, it drops the message.

RSVP GR

RSVP Graceful Restart (GR) preserves soft state and label forwarding information when the signaling protocol or control plane fails, so that LSRs can still forward packets according to forwarding entries.

RSVP GR defines the following roles:

·     GR restarter—Router that gracefully restarts due to a manually configured command or a fault. It must be GR-capable.

·     GR helper—Neighbor of the GR restarter. A GR helper maintains the neighbor relationship with the GR restarter and helps the GR restarter restore its LFIB information. A GR helper must be GR-capable.

The device can act only as a RSVP GR helper.

The RSVP GR feature depends on the extended hello capability of RSVP. A GR-capable device advertises its GR capability and relevant time parameters to its neighbors in RSVP hello packets. If a device and all its neighbors have the RSVP GR capability and have exchanged GR parameters, each of them can function as the GR helper of another device.

A GR helper considers that a GR restarter is rebooting when the number of consecutive lost hellos or erroneous hellos reaches the value configured by the hello lost command. When a GR restarter is rebooting, the GR helpers perform the following operations:

·     Retain soft state information about the GR restarter.

·     Continue sending hello packets periodically to the GR restarter until the restart timer expires.

If a GR helper receives a hello message from the GR restarter before the restart timer expires, the recovery timer is started and signaling packet exchange is triggered to restore the original soft state. Otherwise, all RSVP soft state information and forwarding entries relevant to the neighbor are removed. When the recovery timer expires, soft state information and forwarding entries that are not restored are removed.

Protocols and standards

·     RFC 2205, Resource ReSerVation Protocol

·     RFC 3209, RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels

·     RFC 2961, RSVP Refresh Overhead Reduction Extensions

Restrictions and guidelines: RSVP configuration

On the following switches, make sure the VXLAN hardware resource mode is Layer 2 gateway if both MPLS and VXLAN are used:

·     S6860 and S6861 switch series.

·     S6800-54HF, S6800-54HT, and S6800-2C-FC switches.

·     Switches labeled with the following product codes:

¡     LS-6800-32Q-H1.

¡     LS-6800-54QF-H3.

¡     LS-6800-54QT-H3.

¡     LS-6800-2C-H1.

¡     LS-6800-4C-H1.

In any other mode than Layer 2 gateway mode, MPLS features are not available. For more information about VXLAN hardware resource modes, see VXLAN Configuration Guide.

RSVP tasks at a glance

To configure RSVP, perform the following tasks:

1.     Enabling RSVP

To establish an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE, you must enable RSVP on all nodes and interfaces that the tunnel traverses.

2.     (Optional.) Configuring RSVP refresh

3.     (Optional.) Configuring RSVP Srefresh

4.     (Optional.) Configuring reliable RSVP message delivery

5.     (Optional.) Configuring RSVP hello extension

6.     (Optional.) Configuring RSVP authentication

7.     (Optional.) Setting a DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets

8.     (Optional.) Configuring RSVP GR

9.     (Optional.) Enabling BFD for RSVP

Enabling RSVP

About enabling RSVP

To establish an MPLS TE tunnel by using RSVP-TE, you must enable RSVP on all nodes and interfaces that the tunnel traverses.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enable global RSVP and enter RSVP view.

rsvp

By default, global RSVP is disabled.

3.     Return to system view.

quit

4.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

5.     Enable RSVP on the interface.

rsvp enable

By default, RSVP is disabled on the interface.

Configuring RSVP refresh

6.     Enter system view.

system-view

7.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

8.     Set the refresh interval for Path and Resv messages.

refresh interval interval

By default, the refresh interval is 30 seconds for both path and Resv messages.

9.     Set the PSB and RSB timeout multiplier.

keep-multiplier number

By default, the PSB and RSB timeout multiplier is 3.

Configuring RSVP Srefresh

10.     Enter system view.

system-view

11.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

12.     Enable RSVP Srefresh.

rsvp reduction srefresh

By default, RSVP Srefresh is disabled.

After RSVP Srefresh is enabled, RSVP maintains the path and reservation states by sending Srefresh messages rather than standard refresh messages.

Configuring reliable RSVP message delivery

13.     Enter system view.

system-view

14.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

15.     Enable reliable RSVP message delivery.

rsvp reduction srefresh reliability

By default, Srefresh and reliable RSVP message delivery are disabled.

16.     (Optional.) Set the retransmission parameters for reliable RSVP message delivery.

¡     Set the retransmission increment value for reliable RSVP message delivery.

rsvp reduction retransmit increment increment-value

By default, the RSVP message retransmission increment is 1.

¡     Set the retransmission interval for reliable RSVP message delivery.

rsvp reduction retransmit interval interval

By default, the RSVP message retransmission interval is 500 milliseconds.

The actual retransmission interval equals (1 + retransmission increment value ) × retransmission interval.

Configuring RSVP hello extension

About RSVP hello extension

When RSVP hello extension is enabled on an interface, the device receives and sends hello messages through the interface to detect the neighbor's status.

If the device receives a hello request from the neighbor, the device replies with a hello ACK message. If the device receives no hello request from the neighbor within the interval specified by the hello interval command, the device sends hello requests to the neighbor.

When the number of consecutive lost hellos or erroneous hellos from the neighbor reaches the maximum (specified by the hello lost command), the device determines the neighbor is in fault. If GR is configured, the device acts as a GR helper to help the neighbor to restart. If FRR is configured, the device performs an FRR. For more information about FRR, see "Configuring MPLS TE."

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Enable RSVP hello extension.

rsvp hello enable

By default, RSVP hello extension is disabled.

4.     (Optional.) Set RSVP hello extension parameters:

a.     Return to system view.

quit

b.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

c.     Set the maximum number of consecutive lost or erroneous hellos.

hello lost times

By default, the maximum number is 4.

d.     Set the interval for sending hello requests.

hello interval interval

By default, hello requests are sent every 5 seconds.

Configuring RSVP authentication

About RSVP authentication

RSVP adopts hop-by-hop authentication to prevent fake resource reservation requests from occupying network resources. The interfaces at the two ends of a link must use the same authentication key.

Restrictions and guidelines for RSVP authentication

Do not enable both RSVP authentication and FRR on the same interface. Otherwise, the authentication might fail.

RSVP authentication can be configured in the following views:

·     RSVP view—Configuration applies to all RSVP security associations.

·     RSVP neighbor view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations with the specified RSVP neighbor.

·     Interface view—Configuration applies only to RSVP security associations established on the current interface.

Configurations in RSVP neighbor view, interface view, and RSVP view are in descending order of priority.

Configuring RSVP authentication (RSVP neighbor view)

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

3.     Create an RSVP authentication neighbor and enter RSVP neighbor view.

peer ip-address

4.     Enable RSVP authentication for the RSVP neighbor and specify the authentication key.

authentication key { cipher | plain } string

By default, RSVP authentication is disabled.

5.     (Optional.) Enable challenge-response handshake for the RSVP neighbor.

authentication challenge

By default, the challenge-response handshake feature is disabled.

6.     (Optional.) Set the idle timeout for the RSVP security associations with the RSVP neighbor.

authentication lifetime life-time

By default, the idle timeout is 1800 seconds (30 minutes).

7.     (Optional.) Set the maximum number of out-of-sequence RSVP authentication messages that can be received from the RSVP neighbor.

authentication window-size number

By default, only one RSVP authenticated message can be received out of sequence.

Configuring RSVP authentication (interface view)

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

3.     Enable RSVP authentication on the interface and configure the authentication key.

rsvp authentication key { cipher | plain } string

By default, RSVP authentication is disabled.

4.     (Optional.) Enable challenge-response handshake on the interface.

rsvp authentication challenge

By default, the challenge-response handshake feature is disabled.

5.     (Optional.) Set the idle timeout for RSVP security associations on the interface.

rsvp authentication lifetime life-time

By default, the idle timeout is 1800 seconds (30 minutes).

6.     (Optional.) Set the maximum number of out-of-sequence RSVP authentication messages that can be received on the interface.

rsvp authentication window-size number

By default, only one RSVP authenticated message can be received out of sequence.

Configuring RSVP authentication (RSVP view)

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

3.     Enable RSVP authentication globally and configure the authentication key.

authentication key { cipher | plain } string

By default, RSVP authentication is disabled.

4.     (Optional.) Enable challenge-response handshake globally.

authentication challenge

By default, the challenge-response handshake feature is disabled.

5.     (Optional.) Set the global idle timeout for RSVP security associations.

authentication lifetime life-time

By default, the idle timeout is 1800 seconds (30 minutes).

6.     (Optional.) Set the global RSVP authentication window size (the maximum number of RSVP authenticated messages that can be received out of sequence).

authentication window-size number

By default, only one RSVP authenticated message can be received out of sequence.

Setting a DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets

About DSCP value

The DSCP value of an IP packet specifies the priority level of the packet and affects the transmission priority of the packet.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

3.     Set a DSCP value for outgoing RSVP packets.

dscp dscp-value

By default, the DSCP value is 48.

Configuring RSVP GR

Prerequisites

RSVP GR depends on the RSVP hello extension feature. When configuring RSVP GR, you must enable RSVP hello extension.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter RSVP view.

rsvp

3.     Enable GR for RSVP.

graceful-restart enable

By default, RSVP GR is disabled.

Enabling BFD for RSVP

About BFD for RSVP

If a link fails, MPLS TE tunnels over the link fail to forward packets. MPLS TE cannot quickly detect a link failure. To address this issue, you can enable BFD for RSVP so MPLS TE can quickly switch data from the primary path to the backup path upon a link failure.

Procedure

1.     Enter system view.

system-view

2.     Enter interface view.

interface interface-type interface-number

You must enable RSVP on the interface.

3.     Enable BFD for the RSVP neighbor on the interface.

rsvp bfd enable

By default, RSVP BFD is disabled.

Display and maintenance commands for RSVP

Execute display commands in any view and reset commands in user view.

 

Task

Command

Display RSVP information.

display rsvp [ interface [ interface-type interface-number ] ]

Display information about the security associations established with RSVP neighbors.

display rsvp authentication [ from ip-address ] [ to ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Display information about CRLSPs established through RSVP.

display rsvp lsp [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ lsp-id lsp-id ] [ verbose ]

Display information about RSVP neighbors.

display rsvp peer [ interface interface-type interface-number ] [ ip ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Display information about RSVP resource reservation requests sent to upstream devices.

display rsvp request [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ prevhop ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Display information about RSVP resource reservation states.

display rsvp reservation [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ nexthop ip-address ] [ verbose ]

Display information about RSVP path states.

display rsvp sender [ destination ip-address ] [ source ip-address ] [ tunnel-id tunnel-id ] [ lsp-id lsp-id ] [ verbose ]

Display RSVP statistics.

display rsvp statistics [ interface [ interface-type interface-number ] ]

Clear RSVP security associations.

reset rsvp authentication [ from ip-address to ip-address ]

Clear RSVP statistics.

reset rsvp statistics [ interface [ interface-type interface-number ]

 

RSVP configuration examples

Example: Establishing an MPLS TE tunnel with RSVP-TE

Network configuration

Switch A, Switch B, Switch C, and Switch D run IS-IS and all of them are Layer 2 switches.

Use RSVP-TE to establish an MPLS TE tunnel from Switch A to Switch D to transmit data between the two IP networks. The MPLS TE tunnel requires a bandwidth of 2000 kbps.

The maximum bandwidth of the link that the tunnel traverses is 10000 kbps and the maximum reservable bandwidth of the link is 5000 kbps.

Figure 2 Network diagram

 

Table 1 Interface and IP address assignment

Device

Interface

IP address

Device

Interface

IP address

Switch A

Loop0

1.1.1.9/32

Switch D

Loop0

4.4.4.9/32

 

Vlan-int1

10.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int3

30.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int10

100.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int10

100.1.2.1/24

Switch B

Loop0

2.2.2.9/32

Switch C

Loop0

3.3.3.9/32

 

Vlan-int1

10.1.1.2/24

 

Vlan-int3

30.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

20.1.1.1/24

 

Vlan-int2

20.1.1.2/24

 

Procedure

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address:

# Configure Switch A.

<SwitchA> system-view

[SwitchA] isis 1

[SwitchA-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0001.00

[SwitchA-isis-1] quit

[SwitchA] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] isis enable 1

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] quit

[SwitchA] interface loopback 0

[SwitchA-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[SwitchA-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchA-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Switch B.

<SwitchB> system-view

[SwitchB] isis 1

[SwitchB-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0002.00

[SwitchB-isis-1] quit

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] isis enable 1

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] quit

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] isis enable 1

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] quit

[SwitchB] interface loopback 0

[SwitchB-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[SwitchB-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchB-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Switch C.

<SwitchC> system-view

[SwitchC] isis 1

[SwitchC-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0003.00

[SwitchC-isis-1] quit

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 3

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] isis enable 1

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] quit

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] isis enable 1

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] quit

[SwitchC] interface loopback 0

[SwitchC-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[SwitchC-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchC-LoopBack0] quit

# Configure Switch D.

<SwitchD> system-view

[SwitchD] isis 1

[SwitchD-isis-1] network-entity 00.0005.0000.0000.0004.00

[SwitchD-isis-1] quit

[SwitchD] interface vlan-interface 3

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] isis enable 1

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] quit

[SwitchD] interface loopback 0

[SwitchD-LoopBack0] isis enable 1

[SwitchD-LoopBack0] isis circuit-level level-2

[SwitchD-LoopBack0] quit

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on each switch to verify that the switches have learned the routes to one another, including the routes to the loopback interfaces. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, and enable MPLS, MPLS TE, and RSVP:

# Configure Switch A.

[SwitchA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[SwitchA] mpls te

[SwitchA-te] quit

[SwitchA] rsvp

[SwitchA-rsvp] quit

[SwitchA] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] mpls enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] mpls te enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] rsvp enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] quit

# Configure Switch B.

[SwitchB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[SwitchB] mpls te

[SwitchB-te] quit

[SwitchB] rsvp

[SwitchB-rsvp] quit

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] mpls enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] mpls te enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] rsvp enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] quit

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] mpls te enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] rsvp enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Configure Switch C.

[SwitchC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[SwitchC] mpls te

[SwitchC-te] quit

[SwitchC] rsvp

[SwitchC-rsvp] quit

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 3

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] mpls enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] mpls te enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] rsvp enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] quit

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] mpls te enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] rsvp enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Configure Switch D.

[SwitchD] mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

[SwitchD] mpls te

[SwitchD-te] quit

[SwitchD] rsvp

[SwitchD-rsvp] quit

[SwitchD] interface vlan-interface 3

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] mpls enable

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] mpls te enable

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] rsvp enable

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] quit

4.     Configure IS-IS TE:

# Configure Switch A.

[SwitchA] isis 1

[SwitchA-isis-1] cost-style wide

[SwitchA-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[SwitchA-isis-1] quit

# Configure Switch B.

[SwitchB] isis 1

[SwitchB-isis-1] cost-style wide

[SwitchB-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[SwitchB-isis-1] quit

# Configure Switch C.

[SwitchC] isis 1

[SwitchC-isis-1] cost-style wide

[SwitchC-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[SwitchC-isis-1] quit

# Configure Switch D.

[SwitchD] isis 1

[SwitchD-isis-1] cost-style wide

[SwitchD-isis-1] mpls te enable level-2

[SwitchD-isis-1] quit

5.     Configure MPLS TE attributes of links:

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Switch A.

[SwitchA] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Switch B.

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] quit

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Switch C.

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 3

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface3] quit

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Set the maximum link bandwidth and maximum reservable bandwidth on Switch D.

[SwitchD] interface vlan-interface 3

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 10000

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 5000

[SwitchD-Vlan-interface3] quit

6.     Configure an MPLS tunnel on Switch A:

# Configure MPLS TE tunnel interface Tunnel 1.

[SwitchA] interface tunnel 1 mode mpls-te

[SwitchA-Tunnel1] ip address 7.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

# Specify the tunnel destination address as the LSR ID of Switch D.

[SwitchA-Tunnel1] destination 4.4.4.9

# Configure MPLS TE to use RSVP-TE to establish the tunnel.

[SwitchA-Tunnel1] mpls te signaling rsvp-te

# Assign 2000 kbps bandwidth to the tunnel.

[SwitchA-Tunnel1] mpls te bandwidth 2000

[SwitchA-Tunnel1] quit

7.     Configure a static route on Switch A to direct the traffic destined for subnet 100.1.2.0/24 to the MPLS TE tunnel 1 for forwarding.

[SwitchA] ip route-static 100.1.2.0 24 tunnel 1 preference 1

Verifying the configuration

# Verify that the tunnel interface is up on Switch A.

[SwitchA] display interface tunnel

Tunnel1

Current state: UP

Line protocol state: UP

Description: Tunnel1 Interface

Bandwidth: 64kbps

Maximum transmission unit: 64000

Internet address: 7.1.1.1/24 (primary)

Tunnel source unknown, destination 4.4.4.9

Tunnel TTL 255

Tunnel protocol/transport CR_LSP

Last clearing of counters: Never

    Last 300 seconds input rate: 0 bytes/sec, 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

    Last 300 seconds output rate: 6 bytes/sec, 48 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

Input: 0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 drops

Output: 177 packets, 11428 bytes, 0 drops

# Display detailed information about the MPLS TE tunnel on Switch A.

[SwitchA] display mpls te tunnel-interface

Tunnel Name            : Tunnel 1

Tunnel State            : Up (Main CRLSP up, Shared-resource CRLSP down)

Tunnel Attributes      :

  LSP ID               : 23331           Tunnel ID            : 1

  Admin State          : Normal

  Ingress LSR ID       : 1.1.1.9         Egress LSR ID        : 4.4.4.9

  Signaling            : RSVP-TE         Static CRLSP Name    : -

  Resv Style           : SE

  Tunnel mode          : -

  Reverse-LSP name     : -

  Reverse-LSP LSR ID   : -               Reverse-LSP Tunnel ID: -

  Class Type           : CT0             Tunnel Bandwidth     : 2000 kbps

  Reserved Bandwidth   : 2000 kbps

  Setup Priority       : 7               Holding Priority     : 7

  Affinity Attr/Mask   : 0/0

  Explicit Path        : -

  Backup Explicit Path : -

  Metric Type          : TE

  Record Route         : Disabled        Record Label         : Disabled

  FRR Flag             : Disabled        Backup Bandwidth Flag: Disabled

  Backup Bandwidth Type: -               Backup Bandwidth     : -

  Route Pinning        : Disabled

  Retry Limit          : 10              Retry Interval       : 2 sec

  Reoptimization       : Disabled        Reoptimization Freq  : -

  Backup Type          : None            Backup LSP ID        : -

  Auto Bandwidth       : Disabled        Auto Bandwidth Freq  : -

  Min Bandwidth        : -               Max Bandwidth        : -

  Collected Bandwidth  : -               Service-Class        : -

# Execute the display ip routing-table command on Switch A to verify that a static route entry with interface Tunnel 1 as the output interface exists. (Details not shown.)

Example: Configuring RSVP GR

Network configuration

Switch A, Switch B, and Switch C run IS-IS, and all of them are Layer 2 switches.

Use RSVP-TE to establish a TE tunnel from Switch A to Switch C.

Configure RSVP GR on the switches to ensure continuous forwarding when a switch reboots.

Figure 3 Network diagram

 

Procedure

1.     Configure IP addresses and masks for interfaces. (Details not shown.)

2.     Configure IS-IS to advertise interface addresses, including the loopback interface address. (Details not shown.)

3.     Configure an LSR ID, enable MPLS, MPLS TE, RSVP, and RSVP hello extension:

# Configure Switch A.

<SwitchA> system-view

[SwitchA] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[SwitchA] mpls te

[SwitchA-te] quit

[SwitchA] rsvp

[SwitchA-rsvp] quit

[SwitchA] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] mpls enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] mpls te enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] rsvp enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] rsvp hello enable

[SwitchA-Vlan-interface1] quit

# Configure Switch B.

<SwitchB> system-view

[SwitchB] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[SwitchB] mpls te

[SwitchB-te] quit

[SwitchB] rsvp

[SwitchB-rsvp] quit

[SwitchB-mpls] interface vlan-interface 1

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] mpls enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] mpls te enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] rsvp enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] rsvp hello enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface1] quit

[SwitchB] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] mpls te enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] rsvp enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] rsvp hello enable

[SwitchB-Vlan-interface2] quit

# Configure Switch C.

<SwitchC> system-view

[SwitchC] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[SwitchC] mpls te

[SwitchC-te] quit

[SwitchC] rsvp

[SwitchC-rsvp] quit

[SwitchC] interface vlan-interface 2

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] mpls enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] mpls te enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] rsvp enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] rsvp hello enable

[SwitchC-Vlan-interface2] quit

4.     Configure IS-IS TE. (Details not shown.)

5.     Configure an MPLS TE tunnel. (Details not shown.)

6.     Configure RSVP GR:

# Configure Switch A.

[SwitchA] rsvp

[SwitchA-rsvp] graceful-restart enable

# Configure Switch B.

[SwitchB] rsvp

[SwitchB-rsvp] graceful-restart enable

# Configure Switch C.

[SwitchC] rsvp

[SwitchC-rsvp] graceful-restart enable

Verifying the configuration

# After a tunnel is established from Switch A and Switch C, display detailed RSVP neighbor information on Switch A.

<SwitchA> display rsvp peer verbose

Peer: 10.1.1.2                            Interface: Vlan1

Hello state: Up                           Hello type: Active

P2P PSB count: 0                          P2P RSB count: 1

P2MP PSB count: 0                         P2MP RSB count: 0

Src instance: 0x1f08                      Dst instance: 0x22

Summary refresh: Disabled                 Graceful Restart state: Ready

Peer GR restart time: 120000 ms           Peer GR recovery time: 0 ms

The output shows that the neighbor's GR state is Ready.